The Boy With Pink Hair

The Boy With Pink Hair

by Perez Hilton, Jenn Hill
     
 

He was born that way-The Boy with Pink Hair. He had a cotton candy colored mop that no one had ever seen before . . . Life is not easy being pink. Adults stare at you, little children giggle behind your back and some kids are just mean. But when you have a best friend who appreciates your uniqueness and parents who are loving and supportive, you can do just

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Overview

He was born that way-The Boy with Pink Hair. He had a cotton candy colored mop that no one had ever seen before . . . Life is not easy being pink. Adults stare at you, little children giggle behind your back and some kids are just mean. But when you have a best friend who appreciates your uniqueness and parents who are loving and supportive, you can do just about anything.

From blogger-extraordinaire, Perez Hilton, comes the story of a boy who is not afraid to be who he is and how his difference makes a difference.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Celebrity blogger Hilton makes his debut with a book blurbed by, among others, Lady Gaga ("I wish, when I was young, I had a book as touching and beautiful as this to teach me about the journey of self-acceptance"), and brimming with admirable intentions. But a plea for understanding and tolerance, however necessary, does not a children's book make. Hilton writes as if he's working from a checklist imported from the Ideal World: the Boy's model parents love him unconditionally, "didn't pester him to play games that he didn't like," and encourage his cooking talents by building him a kitchen-equipped tree house. He has little faith in readers' ability to read between the lines ("he followed his own special dream and was happy to be just who he was"). He won't even let his hero have a simple triumph—the Boy not only saves Parents Day with his cooking, but also gets his creations on a restaurant menu. Hill, an animator also making her debut, fares better: her stylish, boldly brush-stroked vignettes exude a funny franticness, and her bigheaded, eager-eyed characters will feel instantly familiar. Ages 3�5. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
Gr 1�3—The Boy with Pink Hair "was just born that way! A special boy, different from the rest." His loving parents encourage his interest in cooking and even build him a tree-house kitchen. At school, he encounters a Boy with a Bad Attitude, who tells him he looks really weird. Fortunately, A Girl with Ponytails offers him her friendship. The Boy with Pink Hair invites his new friend home, where she is impressed with his tree-house kitchen and praises the delicious pink food he whips up for her. When the principal's plans for a special parent luncheon are spoiled because the stove is not working, the Girl offers the culinary services of her pal. The whole class, even the Boy with the Bad Attitude, helps to prepare a delicious pink lunch. The food is a hit, and the young protagonist gains instant popularity and success. He realizes that because he "followed his own special dream and was happy to be just who he was," he has made a difference. Quirky cartoon illustrations in vivid colors add a little sparkle to the unsubtle text. Although the conflict and convenient resolution are somewhat implausible, the message of self-acceptance and tolerance is heartfelt. However, the failure to give the characters individual names lends a distant and impersonal air to the narrative. More engaging treatments of the same themes include Susan DeBell's Miranda Peabody and the Magnificent Friendship March (YouthLight, 2008) and Leo Lionni's classic, Swimmy (Pantheon, 1963).—Linda L. Walkins, Mount Saint Joseph Academy, Boston, MA

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780451234209
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/01/2011
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
667,804
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Well before Perez Hilton (the Miami-born Mario Lavandeira) grew his website, PerezHilton.com, into a Tinseltown franchise raking in 9 million page views a day, the self-proclaimed “Queen of All Media” knew exactly how Hollywood was changing. If you used to need an actual talent—acting, singing, playing a sport—in order to make it big, now you could become famous for being famous, and doing absolutely nothing at all. And anyone can do it; in other words, you too can be a Hilton!

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