Boys' Book: How to Be the Best at Everything

Boys' Book: How to Be the Best at Everything

4.1 10
by Enright, Niki Catlow, Guy Macdonald, Guy MacDonald
     
 

How to do almost anything in one handy book.

Found yourself in a sticky situation? Inside you'll learn how to escape quicksand (p. 40), build a raft (p.41), start a survival fire (p.99), or fly a helicopter (p. 11).

Want to impress your friends? Now you can rip a phonebook in half (p. 35), hypnotize a chicken (p. 56), or read their minds (p. 73).

Boring Saturday

See more details below

  • Checkmark Kids' Club Eligible  Shop Now

Overview

How to do almost anything in one handy book.

Found yourself in a sticky situation? Inside you'll learn how to escape quicksand (p. 40), build a raft (p.41), start a survival fire (p.99), or fly a helicopter (p. 11).

Want to impress your friends? Now you can rip a phonebook in half (p. 35), hypnotize a chicken (p. 56), or read their minds (p. 73).

Boring Saturday afternoon? Not anymore when you find out how to make a waterbomb (p. 79), a boomerang (p. 95), or a volcano (p. 88).

And loads of other keen things you need to know how to do!

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Pam Carlson
Hodgepodge is the word for these two collections of such disparate subjects as "How to Tell When Someone Is Lying," "How to Whistle Really Loudly," and "How to Take the Best Photos." More than ninety topics are covered, ranging from a quarter to a full page in length. Although divided by interest to girls and boys—one book for each—most activities would profit anyone curious about them. Just enough information is provided to get readers started on the projects, a jumping-off point for searching out more details. There is no topical arrangement. Crafts, safety, sports, manners, and just-for-fun ideas are all thrown together. Cartoonish pencil illustrations accompany some topics to clarify directions. These books could be useful for program ideas for librarians, teachers, and others working with middle and high schoolers, who might then award participants with "Best at . . ." certificates. The covers feature retro art, which does nothing to attract readers. Although the activities inside are current, those who judge by the cover alone would think that the books are leftovers from the 1950s. They are likeable browsers or gift books but not must-buys.
Children's Literature - Trina Heidt
The Boys Book is strictly a how-to guide for children (not just for boys) that covers a medley of topics ranging from how to fight off a crocodile to how to write a letter. This collection is comprised of mostly useful information, straightforward guidance, and several silly pranks. The best part of the book is that each set of instructions is short (generally not more than a page), simple, and infused with humor. It is not meant to provide enough information to gain mastery of a particular subject but instead is written simply enough to allow readers to gain a basic understanding of each topic and hopefully to encourage an interest in further investigation and practice. Overall, it is a fun read and will allow children to attempt simple things they did not even know they wanted to know. Of the over ninety how-tos, there are two that should have been excluded: lying to your friends ("How to be a VIP") and how to annoy your brothers and sisters. Children do not need extra instruction or encouragement in these areas. Reviewer: Trina Heidt
Kirkus Reviews
Riding along in the slipstream of Conn and Hal Iggulden's The Dangerous Book for Boys (May 2007) comes this similar gathering of advice and activities-revised and expanded from a British handbook (2004) and aimed at a somewhat younger (or less capable) audience. Entries vary randomly in direct usefulness from step-by-step directions for three knots (plus tying a necktie) to living on the Space Station, and in hazard level from techniques for annoying siblings to surviving attacks from bears and crocodiles. The occasional small line drawings are usually helpful, or at least decorative. Though better suited for casual browsing than serious instruction, this will be worth picking up for all those lads (or lasses, though there is a companion volume for girls) eager to learn how to, for instance, throw a lasso, make a balloon dog or hypnotize a chicken. (Nonfiction. 9-11)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780545016285
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/2007
Series:
Best at Everything Series
Pages:
128
Sales rank:
345,265
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.80(h) x 0.60(d)
Lexile:
1040L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >