Boys in Control

( 13 )

Overview

Play ball! That’s what the sixth-grade Buckman Badgers baseball team plans on doing. Eddie Malloy and Jake Hatford hope to lead their team to the championship game the last Saturday in May. But due to a mix-up, Mrs. Hatford has to run a yard sale for the Women’s Auxiliary of the Buckman Fire Department the very same day in their very own yard! Not wanting to miss out on the game, the family elects the only nonbaseball fan in the family, Wally, to stay home and help watch over the sale tables until they return. ...
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Boys in Control

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Overview

Play ball! That’s what the sixth-grade Buckman Badgers baseball team plans on doing. Eddie Malloy and Jake Hatford hope to lead their team to the championship game the last Saturday in May. But due to a mix-up, Mrs. Hatford has to run a yard sale for the Women’s Auxiliary of the Buckman Fire Department the very same day in their very own yard! Not wanting to miss out on the game, the family elects the only nonbaseball fan in the family, Wally, to stay home and help watch over the sale tables until they return. Wally’s ticked off. On top of that, Caroline Malloy has written and will perform a play for a school project and has roped Wally into costarring with her. Let Caroline think she’s so smart. Wally has his own reason for being in the play. It looks like the Hatfords could be totally humiliated after the girls stumble upon an embarrassing item from the boys’ past. Leave it to Wally’s secret plan to turn the tables on the girls’ scheme and prove who’s really in control! Boys rule!

From the Hardcover edition.

Once again the Hatford brothers and the Malloy sisters find themselves pitted against each other when embarrassing pictures of the boys turn up in the girls' basement, and the boys try to figure out how to get them back.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The ninth book about the Hatford boys and the Malloy girls, Boys in Control by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, finds Eddie Malloy and Jake Hatford gearing up for a championship baseball game on the same day that Mrs. Hatford is slated to run a yard sale. Meanwhile, the Malloy girls find some embarrassing photos from the boys' past, but Wally Hatford finds a way to regain the upper hand. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
The Hatford boys and the Malloy girls are at it again, though their devilish pranks and attitudes are beginning to show signs of softening. Josh Hatford and Eddie Malloy are even practicing baseball together and Wally thinks it might not be too bad to have Caroline help him out at the yard sale his mother is organizing. There is still plenty of room for fun and blackmail, though, especially when the girls find some very embarrassing photos of the boys. Imagine the possibilities! Naylor's own photographic memory once again perfectly captures the sentiments of the middle child who seems put upon by all sides, the youngest boy eager to do the literal bidding of his big brothers and pre-adolescents, who are still dismayed and disgusted by the opposite sex. Boys in Control is a fun, quick read that will keep series fans laughing and blushing right along with their favorite characters. 2003, Delacorte, Ages 8 to 12.
— Karen Leggett
School Library Journal
Gr 3-6-In the ninth of this series, the Hatford boys and the Malloy girls spend more time cooperating than fighting. Eddie and Jake both play for the Buckman Badgers in the sixth-grade baseball championship; after she chokes in the first game, he decides to practice with her for the good of the team. Meanwhile the community yard sale Mrs. Hatford has volunteered to host falls on the same day as their playoff game. She enlists a reluctant Wally to take over until she returns, and Caroline sees helping him as an opportunity to talk him into acting with her in a play she's writing for their fourth-grade English class. When the girls find a photo album full of humiliating pictures of the boys, Caroline blackmails Wally to keep his word about being the husband in her play. A subplot about two relatives of Amelia Bloomer trying to steal a framed picture from Wally's house before the sale opens provides suspense but strains credulity. It turns out the frame hides her original bloomers. Still, this is a fast-paced read, and fans of the series will welcome it. It should also interest baseball fans, especially girls, since there is plenty of action on the field.-Tina Zubak, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, PA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780440416814
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 4/12/2005
  • Series: Boy/Girl Battle Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 242,893
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.24 (w) x 7.59 (h) x 0.36 (d)

Meet the Author

Phyllis Reynolds Naylor has written over 100 books, many of which take place in West Virginia.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Read an Excerpt

One

Stuck

Wally Hatford took two baseball cards from his dresser--Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez--and stuck them in a jacket pocket. Jake had given them to him a month before just because he had duplicates, but Wally was going to trade them at school for a magic trick--a box that took a quarter and turned it into a fifty-cent piece.

When he got downstairs and hung his jacket over a chair, he found his mother moving about the kitchen and talking to herself in a state of great agitation.

"I must have been clear out of my mind!" she said, lifting the teakettle off the stove and plunking it right back down again. "I don't know what in the world possessed me to say yes last year, when I had no idea what I'd be doing a year from then."

When Mrs. Hatford talked like this, Wally and his older brothers knew to lie low. Even their father knew that as long as breakfast was on the table, it was better to sit down and butter a biscuit than to ask what she was talking about.

But Peter, who was in second grade, hadn't learned that yet. He licked the grape jelly off his fingers and asked, "What did you say yes to?"

Everyone else at the table gave him a silent shake of the head. When Mrs. Hatford started talking, it was sometimes hard to get her to stop, and the boys would be lucky to make it to school on time. But it was too late.

"The Women's Auxiliary of the Buckman Fire Department's Treats and Treasures yard sale," she said, and immediately sank down in her chair at the end of the table and rested her chin in her hands.

"Now, that's a mouthful," Mr. Hatford said, hiding a smile behind his mug as he finished the last of his coffee. "Did you promise to clean out our attic and look for things to give to the sale?"

"I promised to run the sale!" Mrs. Hatford moaned.

"At the firehouse?"

"Right here in our yard! Right out there on the driveway! Right up on our front porch!" Mrs. Hatford cried.

Now all the Hatfords were staring.

"Well, Ellen, that shouldn't be so hard," said her husband. "I'm sure the boys will help, and I'll do what I can."

"No, you won't, because the sale happens to be the last Saturday in May, and you know what that is!"

Wally tried to think, and then he remembered. That would be the day of the final game in the district elementary school baseball championships. And Jake, his brother, was on the Buckman Badgers.

"If the Badgers make it that far, you know we'll all want to be there rooting for Jake!" Mrs. Hatford said in distress. "I'm certainly going to be taking half days off from work each Saturday in May that he's playing."

Now it was a family emergency! Wally saw Jake's eyes open wide. Even Josh, Jake's twin, looked startled that his mother might have to be anywhere else on that fateful day. Jake had wanted to play for the Buckman Badgers ever since he was six years old. This was the year, and May was the month, and the twenty-ninth was the day of the championship game.

But it just so happened, Mrs. Hatford continued, that in the window of every store in town there was a poster about the Treats or Treasures yard sale, which would be held from noon till four on May twenty-ninth at the home of Tom and Ellen Hatford on College Avenue, rain or shine. So there was no getting out of it. On that particular day, she would need to take a whole day off from her job at the hardware store, but how could she be in two places at once?

There was silence around the kitchen table as sausage gravy congealed on plates and biscuits grew cold.

"Well, after all the practice I've put in pitching balls to Jake for the last five years, I've got to be at that game," said Mr. Hatford. "If I have to take four vacation days off for baseball, that's okay with me. We hadn't planned on going anywhere this summer."

"He's my twin brother! I'm going to be there!" said Josh.

"I've been watching Jake practice ever since I was born!" Peter declared. "I'm going to go sit in the very first row and I'll yell the loudest of all."

"Well, I'm Jake's mother!" Mrs. Hatford said. "How could I not be at the championship game when my very own son is one of the pitchers? At least, we hope the Badgers will be playing that game."

Jake scraped up some sausage gravy with his fork and put it in his mouth, looking very smug and important.

Wally knew what was coming. He knew it before the first word was spoken. He had felt that something was up the moment he'd stepped into the kitchen that morning, in fact. He wondered if he'd sensed it even before he got out of bed. And now the whole family had turned their heads and were looking down the table at him.

"No," said Wally.

"Now, Wally," said his father. "There are times when every member of a family has to stand up and be counted."

"You can count me, but I don't want to do it," said Wally.

"There are times you have to make sacrifices for the good of the family," said his mother. "And you have to admit that baseball isn't your favorite thing."

Wally didn't see that this made any difference. Maybe he did think baseball was sort of boring, and maybe he did like to lie back in the bleachers and study the clouds instead of watching the team practice. But did that mean he wanted to stand out on the driveway surrounded by old lamps and curtain rods and picnic hampers, arguing about prices and missing the game? The game that was going to decide the sixth-grade champion of the district?

From the Hardcover edition.

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Table of Contents

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

One

Stuck

Wally Hatford took two baseball cards from his dresser--Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez--and stuck them in a jacket pocket. Jake had given them to him a month before just because he had duplicates, but Wally was going to trade them at school for a magic trick--a box that took a quarter and turned it into a fifty-cent piece.

When he got downstairs and hung his jacket over a chair, he found his mother moving about the kitchen and talking to herself in a state of great agitation.

"I must have been clear out of my mind!" she said, lifting the teakettle off the stove and plunking it right back down again. "I don't know what in the world possessed me to say yes last year, when I had no idea what I'd be doing a year from then."

When Mrs. Hatford talked like this, Wally and his older brothers knew to lie low. Even their father knew that as long as breakfast was on the table, it was better to sit down and butter a biscuit than to ask what she was talking about.

But Peter, who was in second grade, hadn't learned that yet. He licked the grape jelly off his fingers and asked, "What did you say yes to?"

Everyone else at the table gave him a silent shake of the head. When Mrs. Hatford started talking, it was sometimes hard to get her to stop, and the boys would be lucky to make it to school on time. But it was too late.

"The Women's Auxiliary of the Buckman Fire Department's Treats and Treasures yard sale," she said, and immediately sank down in her chair at the end of the table and rested her chin in her hands.

"Now, that's a mouthful," Mr. Hatford said, hiding a smile behind his mug as he finished the last of his coffee. "Didyou promise to clean out our attic and look for things to give to the sale?"

"I promised to run the sale!" Mrs. Hatford moaned.

"At the firehouse?"

"Right here in our yard! Right out there on the driveway! Right up on our front porch!" Mrs. Hatford cried.

Now all the Hatfords were staring.

"Well, Ellen, that shouldn't be so hard," said her husband. "I'm sure the boys will help, and I'll do what I can."

"No, you won't, because the sale happens to be the last Saturday in May, and you know what that is!"

Wally tried to think, and then he remembered. That would be the day of the final game in the district elementary school baseball championships. And Jake, his brother, was on the Buckman Badgers.

"If the Badgers make it that far, you know we'll all want to be there rooting for Jake!" Mrs. Hatford said in distress. "I'm certainly going to be taking half days off from work each Saturday in May that he's playing."

Now it was a family emergency! Wally saw Jake's eyes open wide. Even Josh, Jake's twin, looked startled that his mother might have to be anywhere else on that fateful day. Jake had wanted to play for the Buckman Badgers ever since he was six years old. This was the year, and May was the month, and the twenty-ninth was the day of the championship game.

But it just so happened, Mrs. Hatford continued, that in the window of every store in town there was a poster about the Treats or Treasures yard sale, which would be held from noon till four on May twenty-ninth at the home of Tom and Ellen Hatford on College Avenue, rain or shine. So there was no getting out of it. On that particular day, she would need to take a whole day off from her job at the hardware store, but how could she be in two places at once?

There was silence around the kitchen table as sausage gravy congealed on plates and biscuits grew cold.

"Well, after all the practice I've put in pitching balls to Jake for the last five years, I've got to be at that game," said Mr. Hatford. "If I have to take four vacation days off for baseball, that's okay with me. We hadn't planned on going anywhere this summer."

"He's my twin brother! I'm going to be there!" said Josh.

"I've been watching Jake practice ever since I was born!" Peter declared. "I'm going to go sit in the very first row and I'll yell the loudest of all."

"Well, I'm Jake's mother!" Mrs. Hatford said. "How could I not be at the championship game when my very own son is one of the pitchers? At least, we hope the Badgers will be playing that game."

Jake scraped up some sausage gravy with his fork and put it in his mouth, looking very smug and important.

Wally knew what was coming. He knew it before the first word was spoken. He had felt that something was up the moment he'd stepped into the kitchen that morning, in fact. He wondered if he'd sensed it even before he got out of bed. And now the whole family had turned their heads and were looking down the table at him.

"No," said Wally.

"Now, Wally," said his father. "There are times when every member of a family has to stand up and be counted."

"You can count me, but I don't want to do it," said Wally.

"There are times you have to make sacrifices for the good of the family," said his mother. "And you have to admit that baseball isn't your favorite thing."

Wally didn't see that this made any difference. Maybe he did think baseball was sort of boring, and maybe he did like to lie back in the bleachers and study the clouds instead of watching the team practice. But did that mean he wanted to stand out on the driveway surrounded by old lamps and curtain rods and picnic hampers, arguing about prices and missing the game? The game that was going to decide the sixth-grade champion of the district?
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 13 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(11)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2013

    Um idk

    Actuslly girls go to mars to get more smarter and boys go to jupiter to get more stupider!!! Yep girls rule girls rule boys drool boys drool

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2013

    Great

    Im in 6th grade and ive read a book a day and i love them i just wish the liabray had them all cause it takes be forever to get tem since i dint have a card to buy it via nook

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2012

    Woah

    Ive been reading this serise for what ..........oh well anyways...this book rocks all stars

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2003

    BOYS DOMINATE AGAIN!

    Great story! I bought this book and I couldn't put it down. Phyllis Naylor Reynolds did it again! I'm in 10th grade and I love how she writes. Great book for kids of all ages.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2014

    I belive that the reveiw thing is not for put downs*cough cough*

    People shouldn't take advantage of this to put down other people.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2014

    To person below

    Girls go to jupiter to get more stupider,boys go to colledge to get more knowledge

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2013

    BOYS ARE AWESOME!

    I hate girls. Girls drool. Boys rock. Girls are annoying. Boys go to Mars to get more bars. Girls go to Jupiter to get more stupider. Girls re stupid.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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