The Boys of Winter: The Untold Story of a Coach, a Dream, and the 1980 U.S. Olympic Hockey Team [NOOK Book]

Overview

Once upon a time, they taught us to believe. They were the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team, a blue-collar bunch led by an unconventional coach, and they engineered perhaps the greatest sports moment of the twentieth century. Their “Miracle on Ice” has become a national fairy tale, but the real Cinderella story is even more remarkable. It is a legacy of hope, hard work, and homegrown triumph. It is a chronicle of everyday heroes who just wanted to...
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The Boys of Winter: The Untold Story of a Coach, a Dream, and the 1980 U.S. Olympic Hockey Team

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Overview

Once upon a time, they taught us to believe. They were the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team, a blue-collar bunch led by an unconventional coach, and they engineered perhaps the greatest sports moment of the twentieth century. Their “Miracle on Ice” has become a national fairy tale, but the real Cinderella story is even more remarkable. It is a legacy of hope, hard work, and homegrown triumph. It is a chronicle of everyday heroes who just wanted to play hockey happily ever after. It is still unbelievable.

The Boys of Winter is an evocative account of the improbable American adventure in Lake Placid, New York. Drawing on hundreds of hours of interviews, Wayne Coffey explores the untold stories of the U.S. upstarts, their Soviet opponents, and the forces that brought them together.

Plagued by the Iran hostage crisis, persistent economic woes, and the ongoing Cold War, the United States battled a pervasive sense of gloom in 1980. And then came the Olympics. Traditionally a playground for the Russian hockey juggernaut and its ever-growing collection of gold medals, an Olympic ice rink seemed an unlikely setting for a Cold War upset. The Russians were experienced professional champions, state-reared and state-supported. The Americans were mostly college kids who had their majors and their stipends and their dreams, a squad that coach Herb Brooks had molded into a team in six months. It was men vs. boys, champions vs. amateurs, communism vs. capitalism.

Coffey casts a fresh eye on this seminal sports event in The Boys of Winter, crafting an intimate look at the team and giving readers an ice-level view of the boys who captivated a country. He details the unusual chemistry of the Americans—formulated by a fiercely determined Brooks—and he seamlessly weaves portraits of the players with the fluid, fast-paced action of the 1980 game itself. Coffey also traces the paths of the players and coaches since that time, examining how the events in Lake Placid affected and directed their lives and investigating what happens after one conquers the world.

But Coffey not only reveals the anatomy of an underdog, he probes the shocked disbelief of the unlikely losers and how it felt to be taken down by such an overlooked opponent. After all, the greatest American sports moment of the century was a Russian calamity, perhaps even more unimaginable in Moscow than in Minnesota or Massachusetts. Coffey deftly balances the joyous American saga with the perspective of the astonished silver medalists.

Told with warmth and an uncanny eye for detail, The Boys of Winter is an intimate, perceptive portrayal of one Friday night in Lake Placid and the enduring power of the extraordinary.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Editorial Reviews

Charles McGrath
Coffey's game descriptions are precise and gripping (even if you've just finished watching the DVD of ''Miracle,'' last year's movie version of the 1980 story, in which Kurt Russell pulled off an uncannily faithful impersonation of Brooks, right down to his icy stare and appalling wardrobe), and the book is far better than the movie at evoking the lives and personalities of the players. Coffey, a sportswriter for The Daily News, is alert, for example, to the vast cultural differences that separated the streetwise New Englanders from the soft-spoken Minnesotans, many of them from the hardscrabble Iron Range, and he shows how these manifested themselves on the ice as well as in the locker room. He gives affecting portraits of, among others, Mark Pavelich, the team oddball, and Steve Janaszak, the backup goalie, who never got a minute of Olympic ice time.
— The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
In this well-written and thoroughly researched story of the 1980 Olympic gold-medal winning hockey team, New York Daily News sportswriter Coffey does much more than simply evoke memories. Expertly using coach Herb Brooks (who died last year in an auto accident) as his focal point, Coffey shows how Brooks, a devoted student of the game, used both psychological tactics and a groundbreaking system predicated on speed and constant motion to defeat the Soviets, a team of highly trained, older and bigger professionals who had dominated the international competition for decades. Over the years, this story of the Americans' victory has become larger than life, replete with drama and drenched in patriotic themes. Coffey's greatest achievement is that his narrative never sinks into melodrama. He captures the rigorous training and the thrill of the games, yet digs deeper, soberly rendering the tenor of the American spirit amid the Iranian hostage crisis and the Cold War, and humanizing and illuminating (rather than caricaturing) the Russian side. For example, although the Russians were a world superpower, they scrounged for Band-Aids and didn't use slap shots because a shortage of quality sticks meant they couldn't risk breaking them-details suggesting the underlying faults of the Soviet regime. Coffey portrays the American side, a diverse collection of amateurs, warts and all, and gives special attention to Brooks, an enigmatic figure who turned a bunch of regional rivals into a tight-knit family whose bond sti ll exists today. Filled with primary interviews and exceptional insight, Coffey's effort should delight more than just hockey fans. Photos. Agent, Andrew Stuart. (Jan.) Forecast: Although the current NHL lockout may mean a lack of exposure to this book's natural audience (it won't get plugs between periods of games, since there are none), February marks the 25th anniversary of the 1980 Olympic team, which could help sales. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Adult/High School-A masterfully told narrative of the team's gold medal victory at Lake Placid, NY. The author's skilled depiction of personalities, breathtaking rendering of action on the ice, talent for capturing colorful regional hotbeds of hockey, and seamless segues between past and present are handled without loss of forward momentum in the story line. The saga of how coach Herb Brooks motivated a roster of 20 amateur, mostly college-age young men to orchestrate victory over an established Soviet team of seasoned, professionally trained skaters offers suspense, heroism, and a dizzying sense of the "full competitive combustion" that is a hallmark of this sport. A portrait of Brooks emerges as an irascible, obstinate, aloof, but savvy coaching genius who elicited singular creativity, grit, and a passionate teamwork ethic from his players. The 1980 setting for the XIII Winter Olympics, well before the age of blockbuster budgets and corporate sponsorship, is described in retrospect as having an "endearing, small-scale quality," where the potential for miraculous athletic performance resided in "a team full of dreamers" rather than a Dream Team. Vignettes of the Americans' hometown roots, as well as selective quotes and insights from members of the Soviet team's skating dynasty, nicely round out the coverage. Bottom line: the sports action is superb, the players' character enhancement and values are deftly related to coaching lessons learned, and the decade perspective is sketched with a fine hand.-Lynn Nutwell, Fairfax City Regional Library, VA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
An exciting replay of the American hockey team's defeat of the Soviets at the 1980 Olympics from Daily News sportswriter Coffey, who provides generous background on both teams. The sensational American victory became iconic for a country still mired in post-Vietnam malaise, infuriated by the Iranian hostage crisis, and depressed by a faltering economy. But this come-from-behind fairy tale is not what occupies Coffey. Enough of the jingoism and folderol, he writes: Who were these guys? What were they holding in their hands? Coffey proceeds to describe the mechanics of the game, with the US eschewing its usual dump-and-chase tactics to play with more finesse. "A well-conditioned teams wins in the first 10 minutes, maybe less," the Soviets' famed coach Anatoly Tarasov had once said. The US coach, Herb Brooks, knew that his team couldn't wait too long to take charge; from the beginning, they needed to have the "speed of hand, speed of foot, speed of mind" for which the Tarasov-trained Soviets were famed. To achieve this, Brooks would have to overcome the bitter regionalism of the players and mold them into a symphony on ice. Along with the game's play-by-play, Coffey braids into the story the backgrounds of the US players and as much of the Soviet players' as he can. He shows the Americans adapting to a hard, aloof Brooks, happy to have a measure of luck (as well as poor Soviet tactics) on their side. Then come the years thereafter: the alcoholism and the vehicular homicide balanced against the pro careers and the successful restaurant business. Coffey's tale reminds us of a more innocent Olympics era, when doping and judging scandals were not common currency, when there were no millionaireprofessionals at play in an overhyped "dream team." The 1980 hockey players were, contrarily, a bunch of amateurs and dreamers. Makes pure hockey of a much-manipulated moment. (8 pp. b&w photos, not seen)Agent: Andrew Stuart/The Literary Group
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307237316
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/11/2005
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 62,578
  • File size: 443 KB

Meet the Author

Wayne Coffey is an award-winning sportswriter for New York’s Daily News and the author of more than thirty books. He lives in the Hudson Valley region of New York.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

WEEDING THE GARDEN

Vladimir Petrov was skating in loose figure eights near center ice, his pace slow, his stick still and horizontal, a predator in wait. He edged in for the opening face-off. His two famous wings, Boris Mikhailov and Valery Kharlamov, were on his flanks. Petrov, No. 16, was perhaps the strongest player on the Soviet national team, with blacksmith arms and a bulging neck, a 200-pound slab of muscle who was possessed of the rarest of Russian weapons: a nasty slap shot. Historically, not many Russian players had one because for years not very many practiced slap shots, sticks being both in short supply and of inferior quality. If you wound up and cranked a slap shot, you stood a good chance of getting a splinter and having no stick to play with. “So we never slap puck,” defenseman Sergei Starikov said. “We make good wrist shot instead.” Petrov was 32, a two-time Olympic gold medalist and nine-time world champion. He didn’t know much of anything about Mark Johnson, the U.S. center whom he was about to face off against, except that he wore No. 10 and he looked small and ridiculously young.

It was 5:06 p.m. in Lake Placid, and 1:06 a.m. in Moscow. Bill Cleary, star of the 1960 gold-medal team that had been the last U.S. team to beat the Soviets, had just finished a brief talk in the locker room. “There’s no doubt in my mind–nor in the minds of all the guys on the ’60 team–that you are going to win this game. You are a better team than we were,” Cleary said. Herb Brooks followed him, standing at one end of Locker Room 5 in the new Olympic Field House, wearing a camel-hair sports coat and plaid pants that would’ve looked at home on the dance floor of Saturday Night Fever. The room was a cramped, unadorned rectangle with a rubber-mat floor and a steeply pitched ceiling, situated directly beneath the stands. You could hear stomping and chanting and feel the anticipatory buzz that was all over the Adirondacks. There was a small chalkboard to Brooks’s right and a tiny shower area behind him, the players on the wood benches rimming the room all around him. On the ride to the arena, Brooks sat with assistant Craig Patrick and they talked about what Brooks was going to say to the team. Brooks loved intrigue, the element of surprise. His whole style of play was constructed on it, moving players around, changing breakout patterns, keeping people guessing about everything. Just when his players were sure he was completely inhumane, he’d throw a tennis ball on the ice for a diversion, or have guys play opposite-handed or in different positions, lifting morale and breaking the routine. “You’re going to like it,” Brooks said to Patrick of his talk. The locker room was intense and quiet. Defenseman Bill Baker caught the eye of backup goaltender Steve Janaszak, his former teammate at the University of Minnesota. “What do we do now?” Baker mouthed.

“Pray,” Janaszak mouthed back.

Herb Brooks stood before his twenty players. The quiet got deeper. The coach pulled out a yellow scrap of paper and said, “You were born to be a player. You were meant to be here. This moment is yours.”

Neal Broten, 20-year-old center, second youngest player on the youngest Olympic hockey team the United States had ever fielded, looked down at his skates. “I didn’t know what he was talking about,” Broten said. Broten was nervous, very nervous. He knew he could handle the skating, playing the game. The Russians’ strength he wasn’t so sure about. Don’t make any glaring mistakes, he told himself.

Led by goaltender Jim Craig, the players charged out of the locker room, turned right and then right again. At the threshold of the ice, Craig paused and looked up for a second. The building was shaking from the cheers. He took it in and it felt great. Ten days earlier, the players hadn’t been much less anonymous than the Lake Placid goal judges. Now that they’d gone undefeated in five games and come from behind in four of them, they were Olympic darlings. Somebody rang a cowbell, a tinny touch of the Alps in the Adirondacks. “C’mon, Magic!” winger John “Bah” Harrington shouted to Mark Johnson from the end of the American bench. Magic was Johnson’s nickname. If you ever saw him play you know why.

The last time the U.S. players had seen Petrov and his teammates was thirteen days earlier, in Madison Square Garden, where the Americans didn’t lose so much as get annihilated. That day began with the crowd jeering the Soviet national anthem and cheering every solid American check, and it ended with the fans in numbed silence, even before Soviet winger Alexander Maltsev put a red-coated exclamation point on things. Maltsev was 30 years old and would become the Soviet Union’s all-time leading goal scorer in international competition. Speeding across the U.S. blue line in the third period, defenseman Dave Christian in front of him, Maltsev cruised left by the top of the circle and then began to spin, 360 degrees in a blur, the puck on his stick as if it were glued. When he was done spinning he started snapping, a backhand, inside the far post. In the U.S. goal, Steve Janaszak looked at Christian in disbelief and then laughed inside his mask.

“They were gods,” Janaszak said. On the U.S. bench, trainer Gary Smith walked over to Brooks. “We don’t have a chance against these guys,” Smith said.

“No shit,” the coach replied.

Brooks had spent months trying to debunk the aura surrounding the Soviets. He would talk about how Mikhailov, the fabled captain, looked like Stan Laurel, with his long face and jutting chin. He would tell his players that the team was getting old, that the Russians’ time was past. It was a hard sell on a wintry Saturday in New York City, the U.S. players taking the ice with a bit of trepidation and a lot of awe. “It was hard to even warm up,” Harrington said. “We looked down at the other end of the ice and there they were: Kharlamov, Petrov, Mikhailov. And I’m thinking, ‘Holy smokes, there are the guys I saw beating the NHL All-Stars on TV.’ We weren’t just playing when the game started. We were watching them play, and by the time we felt like we belonged on the ice with them, it was 8—0.”

The final score was 10—3 and merely confirmed what the hockey world already knew: there were the Russians, and then there was everybody else. Virtually everyone expected a similar result in the Olympics. As Harrington knew, the Russians had drubbed the best of the NHL, 6—0, on the same Garden ice the year before, and with their backup goaltender, a guy named Myshkin, no less. “What can change in two weeks?” asked Sergei Makarov, the young Russian star who would go on to a long NHL career. “You can’t get whole new team.” Even Mark Johnson said, “If you asked anyone on our team and they told you we could beat the Russians, they would’ve been lying.”

Publicly, Brooks did nothing to discourage such thinking, saying the United States should forget the Russians and worry about sneaking away with a silver or bronze medal. Privately, he was not so convinced. In the Olympic format you didn’t have to beat a team best-of-seven, or even best-of-five. You had to beat a team only once. The Americans were in superb shape and had a sturdy emotional makeup, honed from months of fending off their coach’s verbal floggings. They could skate completely unburdened by expectation, just as their coach had scripted it. Before the game in Madison Square Garden, Brooks told the players to go out and have fun. He had never said anything close to that in the previous sixty pre-Olympic games. Have fun? Brooks had followed Warren Strelow’s suggestion to let goaltenders Jim Craig and Steve Janaszak share time in the Garden goal, limiting the Soviet preview of Craig and sparing the No. 1 goalie any unnecessary angst. For the first half of that game, especially, the Americans weren’t skating, attacking. Part of it was awe, but part of it was Brooks playing at least a little bit of possum. Even Viktor Tikhonov, the Soviet Olympic coach, said that the U.S. team seemed to be holding something back. Brooks himself later described the Garden game as “a ploy.” What could possibly be gained by playing the Russians tough, waking them up? Brooks was beginning to believe that if everything fell together, the United States could take the Russians into the the third period in a tight game. That’s all you could ask for. You get into that position, and you take your chances.

Six weeks after the death of Herb Brooks, Viktor Tikhonov stood in a barren room inside the arena that is home to the Central Sports Club of the Soviet Army (CSKA). He was 73 years old and surrounded by drab white walls. He had a gray tweed jacket and flat face and slicked-back hair, and the vaguely beleaguered aura of a man who is the most decorated international coach in hockey history but may be most remembered for a game his team did not win.

“No matter what we tried we could not get that 10—3 game out of the players’ minds,” Tikhonov said. “The players told me it would be no problem. It turned out to be a very big problem.”

Across the ice from the American amateurs was not simply a staggering assemblage of hockey talent but the end product of one of the most astonishing sporting dynasties ever developed. The Soviets did not look like much, at first glance, in their well-worn red sweaters and matching red helmets, their chunky skates that looked like Sputnik-era hand-me-downs. They would march into the arena in their long fur coats and fur hats, with strong Slavic faces and impassive expressions, the thick-bodied KGB guy never far away. Then it was into the locker room, into their gear, like a bunch of Clark Kents going into the phone booth, and soon they would be on the ice doing their supernatural tricks, passing from stick to stick to stick, a clacking, high-speed symphony performed by athletes with light feet and hard bodies.

“You’d get in the corner with one of those guys and they’d stick their ass out toward you, it was like pushing against cement,” Neal Broten said.

The Soviets staged a chuda (miracle) of their own once, twenty-six years before Lake Placid. It came in 1954 in Stockholm in their first appearance in the world championships. It was led by Vsevelod Bobrov, the Bolshevik Bo Jackson, star not only of the Soviet hockey team but also of the national soccer team, a man known for both his prolific scoring and his disregard for rigorous training.

The Soviets were still new kids on the world-sport block at the time, as deep a mystery to the Western world as Siberia in January. They had excluded themselves ever since they came to power during the revolution of 1917, pronouncing their distaste for Western-style sports organizations and the Olympics, which Communist party leaders saw as the ultimate bourgeois institution, a certain road to imperialist ruin. The attitude changed, swiftly and markedly, after World War II. The Soviet Union had lost 28 million people in the war and was facing the most massive reconstruction project the world had ever seen. Sports began to be seen as a welcome and pleasant diversion, as Robert Edelman notes in his history of spectator sports in the U.S.S.R., Serious Fun, but it was not enough to merely play. Against a backdrop of heightening Cold War tensions and a recognition by party officials that sporting success could be a valuable propaganda tool, the goal, increasingly, was to win, for the motherland and to show the world that Karl Marx had it right. Or as the publication Sovietskii sport argued floridly, “We have created our own Soviet style in sport, the superiority of which has been demonstrated by our football, basketball and water polo players, gymnasts, boxers and wrestlers in the biggest international competitions. Our goal is to create in this new sport for us, Canadian hockey, our advanced Soviet style, in order that our hockey players, in a short time, will become the strongest in the world.”

Nikolai Romanov, the postwar chairman of the government’s Committee on Physical Culture and Sports, was among the first to feel the heat of the winning imperative. When the Soviet speed skaters were upset in the European championships in 1948, Romanov was removed from his job. He somehow got it back in 1952 but had learned his lesson well. Scheduled to compete in the 1953 world championships in Switzerland, the Soviet hockey team pulled out after Bobrov fell ill. “In order to gain permission to go into international competition, I had to send a note to Stalin guaranteeing victory,” Romanov would write years later in his memoirs.

With Bobrov healthy if not a model of temperance, the Soviets surged into the 1954 semifinals against Canada, the most dominant hockey nation on earth. For years the Canadian custom was to send its senior-league champion to the world championships, men who had regular jobs by day and played their hockey by night. That year’s Canadian representative was the East York Lyndhursts. It wasn’t regarded as one of Canada’s stronger entries, but what difference would that make? The Soviet Union did not have a single indoor hockey arena in the entire country. Though they had played a game called bandy–essentially field hockey on ice–for decades, the Soviets had formally begun to compete in ice hockey only after World War II.

Few people inside or outside the ancient brick walls of the Kremlin could fathom it when the Soviets scored a 7—2 triumph. Two years later, the Soviets captured their first Olympic gold medal, in Cortina, Italy, shutting out Canada’s Kitchener Dutchmen. In a sport Canadians all but considered their birthright to rule, they found a new heavyweight in town. It was coached by Anatoly Tarasov and his co-coach Arkady Chernyshev, and it eschewed the rough play and dump-and-muck verticality that were the hallmarks of Canadian hockey, in favor of a system built on speed and crisscrossing movement. The Canadians couldn’t have been more jarred if the Russians had spray-painted Marxist slogans in the Montreal Forum. A major shift in the ice-borne world–strategic, philosophical, and political–was on. Any lingering doubts about it were dispelled in the Summit Series of 1972, a historic eight-game competition between premier Canadian players from the NHL and the reigning world and Olympic champions from the U.S.S.R. The Soviets were still more than fifteen years away from playing in the NHL, and this was the first time they had ever competed against the world’s top pro players. Most observers predicted a Canadian rout. “I wouldn’t mind playing the Russians with the players we won’t dress,” said coach Harry Sinden, whose roster included Ken Dryden, Phil Esposito, and Brad Park. Sinden was somewhat less swaggering after the Russians took Game 1, 7—3, rolling over the Canadians like tanks on the tundra. Ultimately, Canada would take the series, 4—3—1, but rarely has victory been so chilling. “We would never feel the same about ourselves and our game again,” Dryden would say much later in a symposium on Canadian hockey.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 62 )
Rating Distribution

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(37)

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(17)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 62 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2012

    Love hockey?

    Great read. If you love hockey, read this book.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 8, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Living in the Moment In 1980, the XIII Olympic Winter Games wer

    Living in the Moment

    In 1980, the XIII Olympic Winter Games were held in Lake Placid, New York. At the time the United States was struggling with an economic slump, fighting an oil crisis, and facing many overseas issues like the Iranian Hostage Crisis and the Cold War with the USSR. Morale was down throughout American citizens. Wayne Coffey relinquishes a defining moment of these Olympics and American sports history that changes the course of American spirit by retelling the hockey game of USA vs. USSR in the medal semi-finals in the book The Boys of Winter.

    The Boys of Winter is a compelling story about hard-work, determination, the cohesiveness of a team, and reaching goals. This book is a fantastic read for someone who is looking for a thrilling recount of the biggest hockey game in American history. The book provides amazing information and enticing stories of players and coaches, but it is not a history lesson. The Boys of Winter starts nearly at the first drop of the puck in Lake Placid on February 22, 1980 and ends after 60 minutes of a hard-hitting hockey game.

    I was aware I might be disappointed by this book because I already knew the beginning, middle, and end by watching Disney’s take on the event, the movie Miracle. However, Coffey conveys his own unique spin on the game by accounting for nearly every second spent on the ice, the logistics surrounding it, and my favorite part, expertly intertwined descriptions of each USA player’s personality through special stories of their lives before and after that game. He highlights the strengths of the players enough to make me believe that this win did not just come from a well-conditioned, fairly talented and hard-working group of players; it came from a team where each and every player had their own special addition, from the will to lead by example to the will to disprove stereotypes, that was hand-selected by coach Herb Brooks.

    This book was generally a very quick and easy read, but at times when Coffey was detailing every shot took in each period it would drag on. The extensive hockey vocabulary was hard to follow, especially for someone who does not play the sport. He matches his specialized moments by enticing and personable stories that make this book fun to read for someone who is looking for more than just the movie portrays about the game and all the United States players.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2013

    Soccer

    My god i am looking for a soccer book

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 11, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Herb Brooks is The Man!

    This is the triumphant story of the 1980 US Olympic Hockey Team. This story captures the hearts of readers everywhere. Read as Coach Herb Brooks tries to form a dream hockey team to upset the Russian juggernaut. This story teaches readers significant morals and lessons. This book is a great read for anyone who loves sports.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    The Boys of Winter

    The novel The Boys of Winter by Coffey is an amazing story of the 1980 Olympic miracle on ice. This story shows how so many players from diverse areas of the country were able to come together and unite in order to win a gold medal. The book gives a great play by play of the game against the Russians that brought the U.S.A. together. At times this book may sound like it is promoting the violence of the game due to the detail Coffey goes into on the hits but he is just trying to tell an accurate account of the game, nothing more. This is the story of a group of men coming together against all odds, this is not just a book about hockey. So even if the reader does not enjoy hockey they should still enjoy this book. The portrayal of Coach Herb Brooks by Coffey is amazing, the reader gets to see exactly what he had to go through in order to unify that team. Overall The Boys of Winter is highly recommended and all sports fans should take the time to read this.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2014

    Im not gonna be a firts gader so im gonna just say that i really love hockey so im guessing this book is gonna be beautiful

    Beautiful sport hockey

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2013

    Intensity, fearlessness, and a story that truly tells itself. Th

    Intensity, fearlessness, and a story that truly tells itself. Thats what this this book is about. The book really captures the setting even around the hockey game. At this time alot was going on in America and that is just as much a part of the story as hockey is. The book describes the intensity of the 1980 american hockey society completely. I would recommend this book to anyone who is an avid sports fan. You don't have to be a die-hard hockey fan to read this. If you love competition and sport dedicated books, this is the one for you. Coffey truly captures each hockey game and describes the full intensity of each and every shift on the ice. Coffey's writing style fit the needs of this story completely. He did not try to overpower the story by his writing but allowed the story to be the "cake" and his writing to be the "frosting." He just spiced up and put the intensity inside of it. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2013

    ***********

    Bob Suter is still alive
    Rate:**************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2013

    S word on page 27

    S%#@ is a bad wordi

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2012

    Excellent

    I was born in 1981 and this gives a great review of the game and players in depth that made up a special moment and team in American history.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2012

    Its a great book but a kittke profanity in it

    ********************************************************************************************************************************************************** stars

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2012

    Good Book

    I enjoyed reading this book. I would recommend this book for any one interested in the 80 Olympic hockey team.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 2, 2011

    Very good read

    I'm not any sort of a hockey fan, and am too young to have seen this game and actually remember it. However I loved the movie that was based on this book & was equally impressed with the book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2011

    Highly Recommended - a must read!

    An inspiring story of a dream come true. The dedication and focus, this coach and team had, is remarkable. Truly a Miracle........ that brought me to tears of joy!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2011

    HOCKEY!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    This is a great book to read if you are interested in hokey and what happened to one of the best hockey team ever put together by Herb Brooks. It tells the story of the 'miracle on ice' of 1980. People wil love this book if they are interested in hockey. I am and i very much enjoyed this book. I could read it over countless times. READ THIS BOOK!!!!!!!<3

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2011

    this is a amazing book

    i love this it is about a dad who.... well you will find out this book is perfect for kids who read at night or hockey but one more time BUY THE DAMN BOOK

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 4, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Top Retelling of the 1980 Team

    Coffey writes an awesome book, capturing not only the drama of the game with the Russians, but also providing snapshot biographies of the key players. Like an expert skater, he weaves in and out with game and player details. The story never gets old and the insight as to the boys in red, white and blue is fascinating. Matters not if you are a hockey fan or sports fan or even if you weren't yet born in 1980, pick it up and give it a read. Great book about a key moment in sports and our nation's history.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 26, 2010

    Winter Of the boys

    Many books can be boring and not keep my interest, I guess I'm a picky reader but for some reason this book kept I interested but it also bagging for more. By Wayne Coffey's righting style it was able to make me feel like I was in the middle of the practices watching the hockey team skate circles around me. Making each person come to life as if I was right beside them as they were telling me the story of their amazing victory. One thing that I believe he could have done better is have more information on the team members not so much the couch. It would have been nice to see how the team members were affected after reserving the gold medal in the 1980 Olympic Games. Overall this book was a very good and exciting read. I would recommend it to any hockey fan and anyone who is looking for a good and exciting read.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2007

    A Gold Medal Book!

    The Boys of Winter gives the reader an inside look at the lives of the players and coaches of the 1980 United States Olympic Hockey Team. It begins with the funeral of legendary coach Herb Brooks in 2003, and follows with the play-by-play of the Lake Placid Olympic semi-final game between the American and Russian teams. With a 4-3 victory over the Russians, the young Americans went on to win the gold against the Finns. The Boys of Winter is much more than the record of a memorable sports event because it takes us into the lives of the players and coaches. During the heart-stopping plays, author Wayne Coffey often returns to a player's childhood with plenty of details about the youngster's early days on frozen Minnesota lakes and backyard ponds. He includes heartwarming stories of the sacrifices parents made and challenges families overcame. We learn that the players continue to excel in their adult lives some still in hockey, others in business and are enjoying new careers. The decade before the 1980 Olympics was very stressful in America: post-Vietnam, rising tension in Afghanistan with the USSR invasion and rising gas prices. The victory gave Americans reason for hope and pride once more. This is a story of winning over impossible odds, of creating unity, and relentless determination. I enjoyed the book in its entirety, especially how the Herb Brooks united the players from the Midwest and the Northeast by becoming their common enemy. As a hockey fan, the description of the game was made more exciting because Coffey departs from the action to player biographies. For someone unfamiliar with hockey terminology, the story could be difficult to follow, although explanations are given of some hockey-talk. This book is a great piece of historical sports writing, covering a phenomenal twentieth century event. Hockey fans, young hockey players, and those who remember ¿the miracle¿ should consider reading The Boys Of Winter. It¿s definitely a score.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2007

    Miracle on Ice

    This is the best book I have ever read. It is a triumphic story about a group of young men overcoming the odds and defeating the Russians.Herb Brooks seems to be the smartest coach of all time, with his strategic plans on picking the team. I highly suggest this book to anyone who is interested in history or hockey.

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