Bradley McGogg, the Very Fine Frog

Bradley McGogg, the Very Fine Frog

by Tim Beiser, Rachel Berman
     
 

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“Eww! What is that? Such horrible stew!
Orange-colored roots that were sticky with goo. . . .”

Bradley McGogg makes his home in the bog where there are plenty of yummy bugs for a frog to feed on. Upon finding his pantry bare one day, Bradley decides to meet his neighbors, in the hopes that they will share some of their favorite meals with him. But

Overview

“Eww! What is that? Such horrible stew!
Orange-colored roots that were sticky with goo. . . .”

Bradley McGogg makes his home in the bog where there are plenty of yummy bugs for a frog to feed on. Upon finding his pantry bare one day, Bradley decides to meet his neighbors, in the hopes that they will share some of their favorite meals with him. But this “bog frog” soon finds that not all animals eat alike . . . .

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Bradley McGogg, a very fine frog indeed, finds his larder in a log in the bog empty. He decides to visit his animal neighbors to see what they have for him to eat. Miss Mouse offers crackers and cheese. "Cheddar with chives and a peppercorn dusting!/ He had never seen anything quite so disgusting." Excusing himself, he moves on to the den shared by bear and hare. He is horrified by the carrots and honey they offer. He also avoids the cow's clover and grass. Still hungry, Bradley returns to his log, where he is elated to find it "a-crawl with a pest infestation." As he gobbles the critters we might find repulsive, he ponders on the "strange things" others eat. Berman's naturalistic small watercolor and gouache paintings are finely detailed vignettes that depict both the mouse's nest and the hare and bear's handsome table service. The animals wear distinctive outfits and act rather human. The artist seems to have relished painting the assorted insects and snails of Bradley's dinner. The lesson of these rollicking couplets replete with internal rhymes is clear: there is no accounting for taste. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

PreS-K

On a hot summer day, Bradley McGogg discovers that his cupboard is empty and goes in search of something for lunch. Miss Mousie offers him rye crackers and cheese, while Herr Bear and Herr Hare invite him to dine on carrots covered in honey. Brad doesn't even consider joining a cow for a snack of clover and grass. Unable to accept the other animals' favorite foods and still hungry, Brad drags himself back home. To his delight, he discovers an infestation of bugs in his hollowed-out log and sits down to a delectable feast. Beiser explores the importance of being neighborly and respecting others' unique customs and habits. The sophisticated rhyming text is accompanied by subdued watercolor and gouache illustrations depicting Bradley and his neighbors (except the cow) dressed in old-fashioned clothing. Each animal's face is imbued with character and personality. Although amusing, this story lacks the whimsical charm and lighthearted appeal of Karma Wilson's A Frog in the Bog (S & S, 2003) and Eric Drachman's A Frog Thing (Kidwick, 2006).-Linda L. Walkins, Mount Saint Joseph Academy, Brighton, MA

Kirkus Reviews
Picky eating has rarely been so lauded as it is in this tale of a delicate amphibian diet. Bradley McGogg finds that his cupboard is bare. After much thought upon the matter he sets off to see if his neighbors might spare a bite to eat. Yet to his steadily increasing horror he finds that mice, rabbits, bears and cows prefer to munch disgusting fare. Downtrodden, Bradley returns home to a house overrun with insects. His hunger abated, he is left pondering at the end of his day, "Other folks eat some pretty strange things." Set in rhyme, these verses prove to be quite strong, always scanning perfectly without seeming strained. The watercolor-and-gouache paintings seem a throwback to clothed-animal images of days of yore-though Potter, for instance, would never have dressed Jeremy Fisher in red-and-white striped overalls and sandals. Berman's palette tends to darker hues, which serves the tale well when the story is located in McGogg's bog, but readers may wish the sunlit fields were a little bit more sunny. An amusing tale, indeed. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780887768644
Publisher:
Tundra
Publication date:
03/10/2009
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
8.20(w) x 10.20(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
2 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Tim Beiser was born on April Fools’ Day in Los Angeles, California. After earning a degree in Economics at Rocky Mountain College in Montana, he moved to New York City where he spent sixteen years as a playwright and science fiction short-story writer. He was a writer-in-residence at the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation of New Mexico, and he founded the creative writing studio The Writer’s Workout in Manhattan. Like most New York artists, Tim has had many day jobs: a pastry chef, an architectural draftsman, a college teacher, a waiter, a nightclub performer, a computer repairman, and, lastly, an emergency medical technician for the Fire Department of New York, driving an ambulance. Tim received a B.A.A. in Journalism from Ryerson University and started a career as a freelance magazine writer. For his work in such publications as National Post Business, Toronto Life, Elm Street, Reader’s Digest, and Saturday Night, Tim has been nominated for four National Magazine Awards. Bradley McGogg, the Very Fine Frog is his first book for children. Tim Beiser is the proud dad of twins Rowan and Daniel, and he and his family split their time between Toronto, Canada and Grignan, France.

Rachel Berman is a self-educated painter who has lived and worked in Canada, the United States, and Ireland. Born in New Orleans, Rachel has worked as a professional artist for over thirty years. Her paintings have been likened to the poems of Leonard Cohen. The mysterious figures and hidden stories glimpsed in her paintings are a reflection of the mysteries Berman has unraveled in her own life. Once known as Susan King, she discovered her original birth name, birth date, and the names of her biological parents only ten years ago. This experience led her to reclaim her long-lost name. Rachel Berman lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

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