Brahms: Symphony No. 1, Tragic Overture

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Scott Paulin
Thanks to her busy recording schedule with Naxos, most music lovers would probably identify conductor Marin Alsop as an American specialist. Her valuable multi-disc survey of Samuel Barber's works is now almost complete, and her discography also includes excellent recordings of Leonard Bernstein, Philip Glass, Michael Daughtery, and John Adams. But Alsop resists being pigeonholed -- back in 2000, in an interview with Barnes & Noble.com, she asserted that she was "very anxious to be the first woman to record all the standard repertoire." Judging from this release, the first in a cycle of the Brahms symphonies, we'll all be the richer as she does so. Brahms's First is...
See more details below
CD
$9.49
BN.com price
(Save 5%)$9.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (CD)
  • All (5) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $6.36   
  • Used (3) from $1.99   

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Scott Paulin
Thanks to her busy recording schedule with Naxos, most music lovers would probably identify conductor Marin Alsop as an American specialist. Her valuable multi-disc survey of Samuel Barber's works is now almost complete, and her discography also includes excellent recordings of Leonard Bernstein, Philip Glass, Michael Daughtery, and John Adams. But Alsop resists being pigeonholed -- back in 2000, in an interview with Barnes & Noble.com, she asserted that she was "very anxious to be the first woman to record all the standard repertoire." Judging from this release, the first in a cycle of the Brahms symphonies, we'll all be the richer as she does so. Brahms's First is one of those repertory works that we tend to take for granted, a reliably satisfying symphonic meal. Alsop's approach is certainly no radical revision, but she animates the symphony with a refreshing spirit of discovery and a palpable sense of pleasure taken in the composer's creative invention. The overall sweep of the work is completely persuasive: Tempos, for example, invariably seem precisely right; her careful control of dynamics and transitions are masterful; and every melody seems molded with an astute sense of its place in the whole. The London Philharmonic plays beautifully for her, as they do also in the Tragic Overture and Academic Festival Overture. In sum, this is an auspicious beginning to what will likely be the first great Brahms cycle of the 21st century.
All Music Guide - James Leonard
Recorded on January 18 and 19, 2004, at Watford Colosseum with the London Philharmonic Orchestra, these performances of Brahms' "Symphony No. 1" and "Tragic" and "Academic Festival Overtures" are Marin Alsop's first Brahms recording. For that matter, these are also Alsop's first recordings of standard repertoire works. Heretofore, Alsop has conducted contemporary music including discs of Rouse, Glass, and Daugherty, plus the complete orchestral music of Samuel Barber. But, as an English critic might say, this disc represents her first foray into the music of the nineteenth century masters. So how is it? It's nice, light, airy, and lyrical. The tread of fate in the tympani in the opening Un poco sostenuto is nice. The deeply emotional Andante sostenuto is light. The exciting and exhilarating Un poco allegretto e grazioso is airy. The great-hearted theme of the closing Allegro non troppo is lyrical. All that's fine as far as it goes. But the energy that courses through the opening Allegro and the Allegretto's Trio, the soulful strength that soars in the Andante, the overwhelming climaxes of the opening and closing movements are not nice, light, airy, and lyrical. They are massive, monumental, and imagined on a far, far grander scale. Likewise, the powerful pessimism of the "Tragic Overture" and the brilliant optimism of the "Academic Festival Overture" are not nice, light, airy, and lyrical, they are the Janus-faces of Brahms' music. While the London Philharmonic plays superbly and Alsop conducts satisfactorily, these performances are merely fine as far as they go, but they don't go nearly far enough. For great performances in terrific sound, try Claudio Abbado's with the Berlin Philharmonic. For the greatest performance of the "Symphony No. 1" ever recorded in passable sound, try Wilhelm Furtwängler's with the NDR Hamburg.
Gramophone - Richard Osborne
These are the kind of bold, generous-spirited performances which a Stokowski or Koussevitsky would probably have been pleased to hear. The sound is full, warm and accommodating.... These are humane, affectionate performances from which browsers and bargain-minded first-time buyers should derive a good deal of pleasure.
Los Angeles Times - Adam Baer
Marin Alsop offers a sumptuously lyrical rendition of the composer's First Symphony and two overtures.... Alsop blends Romantic symphonic convention with the organic phrasing and transitions of a chamber musician. She summons a bright, singing sound from the London Philharmonic, and each gesture flows, yoga-like, into the next.
Courier-Post - Robert Baxter
Alsop leads a lithe and gracefully pliant reading. She finds the musical pulse and clarifies the various instrumental strands in this well-recorded version of the familiar symphony.
Seattle Times - Melinda Bargreen
These are deft, spirited performances that bring out the grandeur of the music but also its complexities and inner voices. Brava.
Newark Star-Ledger - Bradley Bambarger
Alsop's approach to the First Symphony is suitably dramatic, with gutsy playing by the London Philharmonic.... Alsop outscores such rivals as Bernard Haitink in the "Tragic" Overture by keeping the drama on an ultra-taut rein. Overall, this disc bodes well for her enterprise.
Oakland Tribune - Stephanie von Buchau
This is an energetic, meticulously organized and generously expansive album, with the "Tragic" and "Academic" overtures added to the Symphony.... well recorded; beautifully played; handsome new cover art.

These are the kind of bold, generous-spirited performances which a Stokowski or Koussevitsky would probably have been pleased to hear. The sound is full, warm and accommodating.... These are humane, affectionate performances from which browsers and bargain-minded first-time buyers should derive a good deal of pleasure.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 2/22/2005
  • Label: Naxos
  • UPC: 747313242825
  • Catalog Number: 8557428
  • Sales rank: 77,541

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1–4 Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68 - Johannes Brahms & Marin Alsop (47:55)
  2. 2 Tragic Overture, in D minor, Op. 81 - Johannes Brahms & Marin Alsop (14:04)
  3. 3 Academic Festival Overture, for orchestra in C minor ("Akademische Festouvertüre"), Op. 80 - Johannes Brahms & Marin Alsop (10:37)
Read More Show Less

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Marin Alsop Primary Artist
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously