Brain Mechanisms for the Integration of Posture and Movement

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"...continues the excellent tradition of the series Progress in Brain Research in providing a very much needed, high-quality update."
- Motor Control (2005)
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Product Details

Table of Contents

List of Contributors
Preface
Acknowledgments
1 Innate versus learned movements - a false dichotomy? 3
2 Why and how are posture and movement coordinated? 13
3 Motor coordination can be fully understood only by studying complex movements 29
4 The emotional brain: neural correlates of cat sexual behavior and human male ejaculation 39
5 Developmental changes in rhythmic spinal neuronal activity in the rat fetus 49
6 The maturation of locomotor networks 57
7 Reflections on respiratory rhythm generation 67
8 Key mechanisms for setting the input-output gain across the motoneuron pool 77
9 Rhythm generation for food-ingestive movements 97
10 Do respiratory neurons control female receptive behavior: a suggested role for a medullary central pattern generator? 105
11 The central pattern generator for forelimb locomotion in the cat 115
12 Generating the walking gait: role of sensory feedback 123
13 Cellular transplants: steps toward restoration of function in spinal injured animals 133
14 Neurotrophic effects on dorsal root regeneration into the spinal cord 147
15 Effects of an embryonic repair graft on recovery from spinal cord injury 155
16 Determinants of locomotor recovery after spinal injury in the cat
17 Trunk movements and EMG activity in the cat: level versus upslope walking 175
18 Biomechanical constraints in hindlimb joints during the quadrupedal versus bipedal locomotion of M. fuscata 183
19 Reactive and anticipatory control of posture and bipedal locomotion in a nonhuman primate 191
20 Neural control mechanisms for normal versus Parkinsonian gait 199
21 Multijoint movement control: the importance of interactive torques 207
22 How the mesencephalic locomotor region recruits hindbrain neurons 221
23 Role of basal ganglia-brainstem systems in the control of postural muscle tone and locomotion 231
24 Locomotor role of the corticoreticular-reticulospinal-spinal interneuronal system 239
25 Cortical and brainstem control of locomotion 251
26 Direct and indirect pathways for corticospinal control of upper limb motoneurons in the primate 263
27 Arousal mechanisms related to posture and locomotion: 1. Descending modulation 283
28 Arousal mechanisms related to posture and locomotion: 2. Ascending modulation 291
29 Switching between cortical and subcortical sensorimotor pathways 299
30 Cerebellar activation of cortical motor regions: comparisons across mammals 309
31 Task-dependent role of the cerebellum in motor learning 319
32 Role of the cerebellum in eyeblink conditioning 331
33 Integration of multiple motor segments for the elaboration of locomotion: role of the fastigial nucleus of the cerebellum 341
34 Role of the cerebellum in the control and adaptation of gait in health and disease 353
35 Current approaches and future directions to understanding control of head movement 369
36 The neural control of orienting: role of multiple-branching reticulospinal neurons 383
37 Role of the frontal eye fields in smooth-gaze tracking 391
38 Role of cross-striolar and commissural inhibition in the vestibulocollic reflex 403
39 Functional synergies among neck muscles revealed by branching patterns of single long descending motor-track axons 411
40 Control of orienting movements: role of multiple tectal projections to the lower brainstem 423
41 Pedunculo-pontine control of visually guided saccades 439
42 Macro-architecture of basal ganglia loops with the cerebral cortex: use of rabies virus to reveal multisynaptic circuits 449
43 A new dynamic model of the cortico-basal ganglia loop 461
44 Functional recovery after lesions of the primary motor cortex 467
45 Adaptive behavior of cortical neurons during a perturbed arm-reaching movement in a nonhuman primate 477
46 The quest to understand bimanual coordination 491
47 Functional specialization in dorsal and ventral premotor areas 507
48 Spatially directed movement and neuronal activity in freely moving monkey 513
Subject Index 521
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