Brain, Mind and Consciousness in the History of Neuroscience

Overview

This volume of essays examines the problem of mind, looking at how the problem has appeared to neuroscientists (in the widest sense) from classical antiquity through to contemporary times. Beginning with a look at ventricular neuropsychology in antiquity, this book goes on to look at Spinozan ideas on the links between mind and body, Thomas Willis and the foundation of Neurology, Hooke’s mechanical model of the mind and Joseph Priestley’s approach to the mind-body problem.

The ...

See more details below
Hardcover (2014)
$179.00
BN.com price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (8) from $129.94   
  • New (6) from $129.94   
  • Used (2) from $178.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

This volume of essays examines the problem of mind, looking at how the problem has appeared to neuroscientists (in the widest sense) from classical antiquity through to contemporary times. Beginning with a look at ventricular neuropsychology in antiquity, this book goes on to look at Spinozan ideas on the links between mind and body, Thomas Willis and the foundation of Neurology, Hooke’s mechanical model of the mind and Joseph Priestley’s approach to the mind-body problem.

The volume offers a chapter on the 19th century Ottoman perspective on western thinking. Further chapters trace the work of nineteenth century scholars including George Henry Lewes, Herbert Spencer and Emil du Bois-Reymond. The book covers significant work from the twentieth century, including an examination of Alfred North Whitehead and the history of consciousness, and particular attention is given to the development of quantum consciousness. Chapters on slavery and the self and the development of an understanding of Dualism bring this examination up to date on the latest 21st century work in the field.

At the heart of this book is the matter of how we define the problem of consciousness itself: has there been any progress in our understanding of the working of mind and brain? This work at the interface between science and the humanities will appeal to experts from across many fields who wish to develop their understanding of the problem of consciousness, including scholars of Neuroscience, Behavioural Science and the History of Science.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
From the book reviews:

“The editors of and contributors to this volume are to be commended for rescuing from oblivion a number of historical philosophers and neuroscientists from classical Greece to the present. … This volume is highly recommended for programs in the history of psychology and neuroscience, cognitive science, and the philosophy of mind.” (Paul E. Tibbetts, The Quarterly Review of Biology, Vol. 90 (1), March, 2015)

“Any professional in the biological and social sciences with an interest in the genesis of mind-body problems or the current status of consciousness related to brain functioning would profit from reading this volume. … Anyone teaching a history of psychology or of neuroscience at the graduate level could use this text. … The collected essays provide an excellent selective history of the ‘hard problem’ and a sense of current theorizing about the problem.” (Dennis Jowaisas, PsyCRITIQUES, Vol. 60 (9), March, 2015)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Table of Contents

Introduction; C.U.M.Smith and H.A. Whitaker.- Chapter 1. Beginnings: ventricular neuropsychology; C.U.M.Smith.- Chapter 2. Return of the Repressed: Spinozan Ideas in the History of Mind and Brain Sciences; William Meehan.- Chapter 3. ‘Struck, As It Were, With Madness:’ The Phenomenology of Animal Spirits in the Neurology of Thomas Willis; Kathryn Tabb.- Chapter 4. Hooke’s mechanical mind; J.J. MacIntosh.- Chapter 5. Joseph Priestley: An instructive 18th century perspective on the mind-body problem; Alan Beretta.- Chapter 6. Reflections of western thinking on 19th C Ottoman thought: A critique of the 'hard-problem' by Spyridon Mavrogenis; George Anogianakis.- Chapter 7. George Henry Lewes (1817–1878): Embodied Cognition, Vitalism, and the Evolution of Symbolic Perception; Huw Price.- Chapter 8. Herbert Spencer: brain, mind and the ‘hard problem’; C.U.M.Smith.- Chapter 9. Problems of Consciousness in Nineteenth Century British and America Neurology; J Wayne Lazar.- Chapter 10. Emil du Bois-Reymond’s Reflections on Consciousness; Gabriel Finkelstein.- Chapter 11. William James and the “Theatre” of Consciousness; Stephanie L. Hawkins.- Chapter 12. The enigmatic deciphering of the neuronal code of word meaning; Andrew C. Papanicolaou.- Chapter 13. Alfred North Whitehead and the history of consciousness; Laura Hyatt Edwards.- Chapter 14. The ‘hard problem’ and the Cartesian strand in British neurophysiology: Huxley, Foster, Sherrington, Eccles; C.U.M.Smith.- Chapter 15. Is there a link between quantum mechanics and consciousness?;Barry K Ward.- Chapter 16. Consciousness and neuronal microtubules: the Penrose-Hameroff quantum model in retrospect; Eugenio Frixione.- Chapter 17. Zombie Dawn: Slavery and the Self in the Twenty-first Century; David Hawkes.- Chapter 18. Mind and Brain: Toward an Understanding of Dualism; Kristopher Phillips, Alan Beretta and Harry Whitaker.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)