Brain Training For Runners: A Revolutionary New Training System to Improve Endurance, Speed, Health, and Res ults

Brain Training For Runners: A Revolutionary New Training System to Improve Endurance, Speed, Health, and Res ults

3.8 38
by Matt Fitzgerald
     
 

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Based on new research in exercise physiology, author and running expert Matt Fitzgerald introduces a first-of-its-kind training strategy that he's named "Brain Training." Runners of all ages, backgrounds, and skill levels can learn to maximize their performance by supplying the brain with the right feedback. Based on Fitzgerald's eight-point brain training system,…  See more details below

Overview

Based on new research in exercise physiology, author and running expert Matt Fitzgerald introduces a first-of-its-kind training strategy that he's named "Brain Training." Runners of all ages, backgrounds, and skill levels can learn to maximize their performance by supplying the brain with the right feedback. Based on Fitzgerald's eight-point brain training system, this book will help runners:

- Resist running fatigue
- Use cross-training as brain training
- Master the art of pacing
- Learn to run "in the zone"
- Outsmart injuries
- Fuel the brain for maximum performance
- And more

Packed with cutting-edge research, real-world examples, and the wisdom of the world's top distance runners, Brain Training for Runners offers easily applied advice and delivers practical results for a better overall running experience.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781440619175
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/04/2007
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
576
Sales rank:
555,417
File size:
28 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Matt Fitzgerald coaches online through TrainingPeaks.com and serves as a communications consultant to sports nutrition companies. A former editor at several top fitness magazines, he is the author of numerous articles and books. He lives in Northern California.

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Brain Training for Runners 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 38 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book makes a lot of sense. There is nothng radical in it - if you read a lot of running books, especially Tim Noakes, you will see some of these ideas elsewhere, but they have been pulled together into one practical guide and good set of training schedules. I have followed the Marathon schedules and got my PB down from a really hard 3:20 to a comfortable 3:08 and Half marathon from 1:30 on a flat course to a 1:24 PB on a hilly course. I intend to continue using these schedules, and I recommend you do too. The only reason I havent given five stars is that the programmes are all in text only, no website to download an editable version.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As an experienced triathlete and runner, when I read Brain Training my first reaction was 'At last -- someone who makes sense out some of the contradictions and puzzles of training!' From 10k to Ironman training, I have had nagging questions about some of the traditional thinking related to heart rate zone training. Matt Fitzgerald provides a new lens with which to look at how we train, compete and recover. I highly recommend this for anyone who wants insight and guidance into getting the most from your own brain and brawn!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great book for runners who want to improve. I have read many books on mental imagery and mental toughness for running and sport, but this book is a cut above the others. It specifically talks about the science of brain training and how one can improve by doing certain exercises specific to running and racing and injury prevention, etc. It uses an eight-point brain training system. We really underestimate the power of the brain when it comes to training and performance. And most of us spend a lot of time training the body, but not enough time training the brain. I have read this book from cover to cover and continue to refer to it. I credit this book with my 2 minute personal record at the San Jose Half Marathon in October last year. At mile 11, when I was hurting, I remembered one of the propioceptor cues mentioned in the book and gripped the ground with my toes and I imagined pushing the ground back like a belt. It was amazing how much better I felt and I was able to pick up the pace. I had never before been able to pick up the pace at mile 11 of a 13.1 mile race. So this was wonderful to see such immediate results. This book is what you need to give you that extra edge.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Coming back into running a few years ago after a long hiatus 'and with a much older and slower body' I was hungry for up-to-date information on training techniques, nutrition, recovery, etc. I read books by Jack Daniels, Pete Pfitzinger, Hal Higdon, among others. There was lots of great and helpful information, but nothing really different from what I had learned when I ran back in the 80's. Then I found another of Matt's books 'The Cutting Edge Runner' which had appealed to me as a scientist, with evidence-based information on nutrition, cross-training, and recovery that wasn't always available in the other texts. I also have enjoyed Matt's books on cross-training and triathlon so I ordered 'Brain Training for Runners' as soon as I learned it was published. I have read it, and am employing many of the suggestions in my own training. The use of proprioceptive cues is completely new to me, and the stretching and strength drills are stressed as more integral than in most other programs. As I've only recently began incorporating his latest training methods into my workouts, I cannot say if or how much I may improve. However, after struggling somewhat coming back into running in 2005, I've had much greater success in the past year as I've followed his advice on nutrition, recovery, and cross-training. I just ran Houston marathon in a Boston-qualifying time, at a pace that I barely could hold for a 5K race just a couple of years ago. I'm looking forward to utilizing the concepts detailed in this new book in the coming year. I think this book will be very useful for master's age runners 'the cross training will take some of the pounding off of aging joints', and for those who aren't put off by doing some training that might be considered a bit odd by your running partners and look strange to your neighbors. 'Like running with your arms out in front of you like you're holding a bushel basket, running stiff-legged, 'zombie walk' and more' My only gripe with the book, albeit a very minor one, is that a large portion of the book is made up of specific training program schedules. It's a hefty paperback, and someone who just gave it a cursory look before buying may be disappointed when they get home to find that the entire book isn't chock full of Matt's thoughtful prose.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Matt Fitzgerald has written an excellent and very comprehensive book on running, focusing on the connections between the body and the brain. He leverages on cutting-edge research to make the best training recommendations possible, and the results are excellent. Each strengthening excercise, stretch and run has a neurological justification. Feedback mechanisms, including how your body feels, your motivation, and the collective wisdom of previous runners, are detailed and reacting to them discussed. Detailed training plans for common race lengths are included in the back. I have used Brain Training with great success -- trimming almost a full minute off my 'albeit very slow' mile. I find it an excellent, comprehensive approach to training and improving performance.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What a concept...reset, train, and reinforce the way the brain adapts to change and improve your running efficiency. I've always heard that it's mind over matter. Now there is scientific proof to support this. Matt's done a stellar job creating a plan for 5, 10, half and full runs. I've only started with the plan and already see an improvement in time and health.
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tim chapman More than 1 year ago
Written well and full of applicable physiology. The only thing that kept it from 5 stars is better citing of referenced studies
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