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Braise: A Journey Through International Cuisine

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Overview

In Braise, superstar chef Daniel Boulud, with renowned food writer Melissa Clark, presents the definitive cookbook on the time-honored, sublimely flavorful cooking technique, bringing one-pot meals to a whole new level. Braising uses a "moist heat" method, where food and a small amount of liquid are placed in a closed container and cooked over a long period of time. A successful braise mingles the flavors of the food and the liquid, and results in rich, aromatic flavors.

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Overview

In Braise, superstar chef Daniel Boulud, with renowned food writer Melissa Clark, presents the definitive cookbook on the time-honored, sublimely flavorful cooking technique, bringing one-pot meals to a whole new level. Braising uses a "moist heat" method, where food and a small amount of liquid are placed in a closed container and cooked over a long period of time. A successful braise mingles the flavors of the food and the liquid, and results in rich, aromatic flavors.

With inspiring recipes for all kinds of braises—from meat to fish to vegetables—from destinations around the globe, including Thailand, Italy, Mexico, Turkey, Lebanon, France, Russia, and China, Boulud brings the world of braising home with welcome simplicity and intense flavor. Whether he's whipping up the familiar (Pot Roast) for a family dinner or preparing the exotic (Cardamom-Spiced Coconut Lamb) for entertaining, Boulud's expert guidance and easy-to-follow recipes written in Clark's clear and inviting style offer dishes full of variety and unparalleled flavor, sure to delight even the most discriminating palates.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
First of all, a definition: Braising is "moist heat" cooking, where a small quantity of liquid is cooked with the food in a closed container, usually for a long period of time. During this slow cooking process, the natural taste of the food mingles with the flavors of the liquid that surrounds it. In Braise, famed chef Daniel Boulud shares his favorite braising recipes from Thailand, Italy, Mexico, France, Russia, China, Lebanon, Turkey, and other countries. The cookbook's geographical range is matched by the diversity of its recipes. Boulud's nuanced suggestions will reassure even relative novices about this sophisticated one-pot meal technique.
Thomas Keller
“I look forward to the comforting scents and tastes of slow cooked food … ultimately tender and delicious.”
Jean-Georges Vongerichten
“Only Daniel, the expert of slow cooked food, could bring such energy to the art of braising.”
Eric Ripert
“The most exciting book on braising…incredible techniques… thank you for so brilliantly sharing your talent with us.”
Suzanne Goin
“What a treat... sends you running for the kitchen. I can’t wait to cook from this book!”
Emeril Lagasse
“Yum-braise with one of America’s greatest chefs.”
Robert M. Parker
“Daniel Boulud is an undisputed creative genius… Braise is the book he was destined to write… a classic!”
Nobu Matsuhisa
“I love Daniel’s food and it tastes so wonderful.”
Publishers Weekly
As Chef Boulud explains in the introduction, "Every chef has a dish so fundamental to the psyche that whenever he tastes, smells, or even just imagines its flavors, it immediately brings him to where he had it first." Hence, he offers this personal and informative cookbook that focuses on braised meat. Boulud begins with notes on the technique, key equipment, ingredients and helpful tips before embarking on the more than 100 neatly organized recipes such as Veal Breast with Cinnamon and Green Olives; Milk-Braised Pork Loin with Hazelnuts and Pepper; and Royal Shoulder of Lamb with Saffron, Raisins and Pistachios. (Some recipes include nonbraised sides like Celery Root Salad.) There are also chapters on poultry and rabbit, seafood (e.g., Spiced Grouper with Fennel, Cashew and Mango; Sea Scallops with Salsify, Shiitake Mushrooms and White Miso), vegetables and beans, and even desserts, like the unexpected Sweet Eggplant with Pistachios. Headnotes give insight into the cultures that inspired these recipes all of which, as one would expect from Boulud, are intriguing and innovative and side notes on ingredients help make exotic dishes less intimidating. (Nov.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062232380
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/5/2013
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 228
  • Sales rank: 197,643
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Daniel Boulud was raised near Lyon, France. In 1993 he opened his much-heralded restaurant Daniel, which was awarded four stars by the New York Times and praised as one of the best in the world. He has since opened DB Bistro Moderne and Café Boulud in New York, a Café Boulud in Palm Beach, and Daniel Boulud Brasserie in Las Vegas. Boulud has received countless culinary honors, including Chef of the Year awards from Bon Appétit and the James Beard Foundation, which also named him the country's Outstanding Restaurateur in 2006. He lives in New York City.

Melissa Clark writes about cuisine and other products of appetite. After brief forays working as a cook in a restaurant kitchen and as a caterer out of her fifth-floor walk-up, Clark decided upon a more sedentary path. She earned an MFA in writing from Columbia University, and began a freelance food-writing career. Clark is currently a food columnist for the New York Times, and has written for Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, Every Day with Rachael Ray, and Martha Stewart, among others. She has written more than thirty-two cookbooks, including In the Kitchen with a Good Appetite and Cook This Now. Clark was born and raised in Brooklyn, where she now lives with her husband, Daniel Gercke, and their daughter, Dahlia.

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Read an Excerpt

Braise

A Journey Through International Cuisine
By Daniel Boulud

HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2006 Daniel Boulud
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0060561718

Pork Shoulder with Guinness,
Dried Cherries, and Sweet Potatoes

Serves 6 to 8

Pork shoulder is a classic for braising&#8212the meat turns nearly spoonable but still slices nicely, and leftovers are great for sandwiches. In this recipe I've combined the pork with dried cherries and sweet potatoes, balancing their sweetness with the slightly bitter taste of Guinness stout and molasses.

Ingredients:

5 cups Guinness stout
1 cup dried cherries
1⁄3 cup balsamic vinegar
2 tablespoons vegetable or extra-virgin olive oil
1 (5½-pound) pork shoulder roast
Coarse sea salt or kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 large red onions, peeled and sliced
½ teaspoon crushed black pepper
4 garlic cloves, peeled and finely minced
1 tablespoon tomato paste
5 whole allspice, crushed
2 bay leaves
¼ cup molasses
3 tablespoons packed dark brown sugar
2 pounds sweet potatoes or yams, peeled and roughly chopped

Instructions:

Bring the stout, cherries, and vinegar to a simmer in a saucepan. Transfer to a bowl, cover tightly with plastic wrap, and let sit for at least 1 hour, or refrigerate overnight.

Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 300°F.

Warm the oil in a largecast-iron pot or Dutch oven over high heat. Season the pork shoulder with salt and ground black pepper and sear on all sides until golden brown, 12 to 15 minutes. Transfer the pork shoulder to a platter. Remove all but 2 tablespoons of the fat in the pot.

Add the onion and the crushed black pepper to the pot and sauté for 7 minutes. Add the garlic and continue cooking until the onions are translucent, about 3 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste and cook for 2 to 3 minutes longer. Add the pork shoulder, the marinated cherries and liquid, allspice, bay leaves, molasses, brown sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, and 2 cups water. Bring the mixture to a simmer.

Cover the pot, transfer it to the oven, and braise for 1 hour, turning the pork once during cooking. Add the sweet potatoes and continue to braise for 2 more hours, turning two more times. If the sauce is too thin or is not flavored intensely enough, ladle most of it off into another pot and simmer it until it thickens and intensifies. Then add it back to the first pot.

Slice the pork and serve with the sauce on top.


Duck with Green Picholine Olives

Serves 4

This duck recipe is almost a cross between a braise and a confit, since I leave all the fat under the skin during the cooking, then take it off the next day when it's hardened on the surface of the contents of the pot. The fat gives a lot of flavor to the sauce and keeps the duck legs extremely tender. This is an ideal dish to make ahead for a dinner party, since you do all the heavy lifting the day before.

Cooking duck with olives has been a classic method ever since olives became fashionable in France about 100 years ago. Their brininess and acidity work well with the richness of the duck meat. Serve this with crusty bread, because there will be plenty of good sauce for mopping up.

Ingredients:

4 to 6 duck legs (about 3 pounds)
Coarse sea salt or kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
¼ pound sliced bacon, cut into 1⁄4-inch pieces
3 carrots, peeled, trimmed, and diced
2 small onions, peeled and chopped
2 small turnips, peeled and diced
½ cup green picholine olives, pitted
2 sprigs fresh thyme
1 bay leaf
2 cups chicken stock (page 208) or low-sodium canned broth

Instructions:

The night before you plan to serve this dish, place a rack in the lower third of the oven and preheat the oven to 350°F.

Season the duck with salt and pepper. Heat the olive oil in a medium cast-iron pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add the duck legs and sear until golden brown on all sides, 7 to 10 minutes.

Transfer the duck to a platter. Pour off the excess fat from the pot. Return the duck to the pot along with the bacon and cook, stirring, over medium-high heat for 5 to 6 minutes. Spoon any fat out of the pot. Add the carrots, onions, turnips, olives, thyme, and bay leaf, and pour in the stock. Transfer the pot to the oven and braise, covered, for 2 hours, until the duck is tender. Chill overnight.

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Remove the layer of fat from the top of the sauce and heat the duck in the oven for 30 minutes. Remove the thyme sprigs and bay leaf and serve.



Continues...

Excerpted from Braise by Daniel Boulud Copyright © 2006 by Daniel Boulud. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 29, 2013

    recomended

    good book on braising and differ seasoning ideas.

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  • Posted November 11, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Daniel Boulud teaches me to braise

    I like that many recipes inspire a brief treasure hunt for an ingredient that I do not know well and cannot find at the corner market. I have had fun, educational visits to local ethnic markets where someone was eager to locate the ingredient or spice and to learn about the recipe.

    I like the clear and methodical recipes. I am a cook-in-learning, and I have no trouble reading and following the directions.

    I like the food the book helps me cook--meat and vegetables in pleasing combination with layers and melds of spices that demonstrate Boulud's artistry and experience. I think to myself that I would cook a recipe from this book and serve it to Daniel Boulud and say, "So what do you think?" And he would smile kindly and say, "Not bad."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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    Posted January 20, 2010

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