Brand Relevance: Making Competitors Irrelevant / Edition 1

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Overview

Praise for Brand Relevance

"Aaker has nailed it (again)! The long-term viability of a business is inextricably linked to gaining a brand relevance advantage through new category and subcategory development and unique positioning."
Joe Tripodi, chief marketing and commercial officer, Coca-Cola

"Most of our work as brand builders is reactionary, chasing each other's ideas. The result is a marketplace of sameness. David Aaker gives us fresh principles and real ideas to change that, to be truly innovative, to raise our game."
Jim Stengel, former chief marketing officer, P&G

"Aaker has hit the nail on the head with Brand Relevance. You've gotta take the leap or risk getting left behind."
Ann Lewnes, chief marketing officer, Adobe

"Brand Relevance shows how finding a higher purpose, a characteristic of great companies, can affect which brands customers perceive as relevant."
Tony Hsieh, author, Delivering Happiness and chief executive officer, Zappos.com, Inc.

"Loaded with powerful examples, David Aaker's Brand Relevance book brings brand insight to the process of innovation."
Ian R. Friendly, executive vice president, General Mills

"Clarity jumps off the first pages—it's less about the brand-preference battle than the brand-relevance war. And clarity continues as he presents a disciplined process leading to relevance wins and shows how to make innovation pay-off in the marketplace."
Richard K. Lyons, dean, Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley

"Staying the course with familiar approaches to building brand preference risks the likelihood of being made irrelevant by those who jump on Aaker's brand relevance lessons and find new growth paths."
Meredith Callanan, vice president corporate marketing and communication, T. Rowe Price

"A 'wake-up call' for a market leader because if the relevance game is lost so is its market position."
Joseph K. Gross, executive vice president, Allianz SE

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Brand guru Aaker (Building Strong Brands) explains how companies can keep their brand relevant through innovation and the creation of new categories or subcategories that they can "own" in the minds of consumers. While plenty of books emphasize the need for constant innovation, Aaker dives deeper; customers determine brand relevance and companies as diverse as Japanese beer maker Asahi, Xerox, IKEA, Zappos, and Apple have each carved out a unique market niche, a niche that must be protected through the creation of barriers for competitors, Aaker argues. Postmortem evaluations of epic failures like the Segway, Nabisco’s Snackwells product line, and Apple’s Newton digital assistant will help brand managers avoid costly and high-profile marketing missteps. Those familiar with the author’s work will recognize his textbook approach. His clear prose and honest assessments will resonate with small business owners or brand managers and should be required reading for anyone with a vested interest in keeping their company on the tip of their consumers’ tongues. (Jan.)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470613580
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/25/2011
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 571,833
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

David A. Aaker is vice chairmanof Prophet Brand Strategy, an executiveadvisor to Dentsu Inc., and Professor Emeritus of Marketing Strategy at the Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley.

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Table of Contents

Preface

1. Winning the Brand Relevance Battle.

Cases: The Japanese Beer Industry and The U.S. Computer Industry.

Gaining Brand Preference.

The Brand Relevance Model.

Creating New Categories or Subcategories.

Levels of Relevance.

The New Brand Challenge.

The First-Mover Advantage.

The Payoff.

Creating New Categories or Subcategories—Four Challenges.

The Brand Relevance Model Versus Others.

2. Understanding Brand Relevance: Categorizing, Framing Consideration, and Measurement.

Categorization.

It's All About Framing.

Consideration Set as a Screening Step.

Measuring Relevance.

3. Changing the Retail Landscape.

Cases:

Muji.

IKEA.

Zara.

H&M.

Best Buy.

Whole Foods Market.

The Subway Story.

Zappos.

4. Market Dynamics in the Automobile Industry.

Cases:

Toyota's Prius Hybrid.

The Saturn Story.

The Chrysler Minivan.

Tata’s Nano.

Yugo.

Enterprise Rent-A-Car.

Zipcar.

5. The Food Industry Adapts.

Cases:

Fighting the Fat Battle.

Nabisco Cookies.

Dreyer’s Slow Churned Ice Cream.

P&G’s Olestra.

From Fat to Health.

General Mills and the Health Trends.

Healthy Choice.

6. Finding New Concepts.

Case: Apple.

Concept Generation.

Sourcing Concepts.

Prioritizing the Analysis.

7. Evaluation.

Case: Segway's Human Transporter.

Evaluation: Picking the Winners.

Is There a Market—Is the Opportunity Real?

Can We Compete and Win?

Does the Offering Have Legs?

Beyond Go or No-Go—A Portfolio of Concepts.

8. Defining the Category or Subcategory.

Case: Salesforce.com.

Defining a New Category or Subcategory.

Functional Benefits Delivered by the Offering.

Customer-Brand Relationship—Beyond the Offering.

Categories and Subcategories: Complex and Dynamic.

Managing the Category or Subcategory.

9. Creating Barriers: Sustaining the Differentiation.

Case: Yamaha Disklavier.

Creating Barriers to Competition.

Investment Barriers.

Owning a Compelling Benefit or Benefits.

Relationships with Customers.

Link the Brand to the Category or Subcategory.

10. Maintaining Relevance in the Face of Market Dynamics.

Case: Walmart

Avoiding the Loss of Relevance.

Product Category or Subcategory Relevance.

Category or Subcategory Relevance Strategies.

Energy Relevance.

Gaining Relevance—The Hyundai Case.

11. Innovative Organization.

Case: GE.

The Innovative Organization.

Selective Opportunism.

Dynamic Strategic Commitment.

Organization-Wide Resource Allocation. 

Epilogue: The Yin and Yang of the Relevance Battle.

Notes.

Index.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2012

    Every company wants to produce a product or service so successfu

    Every company wants to produce a product or service so successful that people equate it with a market category. Xerox did it with copiers, and the word “Kleenex” has become a common synonym for tissue. Today’s category-defining brands include Toyota’s Prius and Apple’s iPod. Firms such as Zappos, Best Buy and Amazon have introduced offerings so revolutionary they redefined their markets and created new categories. Moreover, they made it almost impossible for competitors to enter the fray. In this in-depth work, brand guru David A. Aaker provides a model for making your brand relevant and dominant. This thorough, well-researched work resembles a textbook, even though Aaker keeps it lively with dozens of case studies. getAbstract highly recommends Aaker’s well-presented information to marketers and branding practitioners.

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