The Branded Mind: What Neuroscience Really Tells Us About the Puzzle of the Brain and the Brand [NOOK Book]

Overview


The Branded Mind is about how people think, and in particular how people think about brands. Brand choice decisions ultimately take place inside the consumer's head. Neuroscience, then, holds lessons for how consumers respond to brands and make purchasing decisions. Marketers and brand managers should take note. 

Erik du Plessis does just that. In this, his second book, du Plessis explores what scientists have uncovered about the structure of the brain and how different ...

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The Branded Mind: What Neuroscience Really Tells Us About the Puzzle of the Brain and the Brand

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Overview


The Branded Mind is about how people think, and in particular how people think about brands. Brand choice decisions ultimately take place inside the consumer's head. Neuroscience, then, holds lessons for how consumers respond to brands and make purchasing decisions. Marketers and brand managers should take note. 

Erik du Plessis does just that. In this, his second book, du Plessis explores what scientists have uncovered about the structure of the brain and how different parts of the brain interact. He investigates developments in neuroscience and neuromarketing and what lessons this holds for brand managers. What bearing do these developments have on current theories of consumer behavior? How can neuroscience contribute to marketing and brand-building strategies? 

Including research by Millward Brown, The Branded Mind touches on key topics such as the nature of feelings, moods, personality, measuring the brain, consumer behavior, decision making, and market segmentation.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780749462987
  • Publisher: Kogan Page, Ltd.
  • Publication date: 2/3/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 1,311,930
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Erik du Plessis is President of the Johannesburg-based research agency, Impact Information. Impact is now part of the Millward Brown Group, one of the world’s top 10 market research companies (owned by WPP) with 65 offices in 39 countries.

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Table of Contents


Foreword by Nigel Hollis About the author and contributors Acknowledgements

Part One: What it is all about 
01 Introduction 
The meta- and the micro-problem Over-claiming Emotions and feelings Where does this leave us?
The puzzle
02 This book is about the consumer's brain 
Why I wrote this book Why do we make decisions?
How do people differ from animals on this view?
How does this happen in the brain?
How do we buy a brand?
Marketing practice So what is this book all about?
03 The new paradigm 
From Descartes to Damasio Who is Damasio?
Who was Descartes?
What is the paradigm shift that we are looking at?
Damasio's somatic marker theorem
04 The brain - the coming together of disciplines 

Part Two: The decision-making puzzle 
05 Interpretation, memory, experience, learning 
Why the memory system is important Feeling good, culture, personality and memories The brain Gestalts What do artificial neural networks do very well?
Marketing implications of classifying and predicting Interpretation, memory recall, 'comes to mind'
06 Introducing the rat brain robot 
Let's look at this robot rat What brain systems does the robot rat need to be more like a human (or just more like a fruit fly)?
'Movere' is Latin for 'to move', 'to be motivated'
Move! But where to?
07 Feelings
Why we need to understand feelings From many gestalts to one: attention and touchpoints Everybody knows what feelings, emotions, and moods are-do the scientists?
Does it matter?
Definition used in this book Time The limbic system: the oldest part of the brain
08 The 'feeling' brain systems and how they work 
Reconciling this view with Damasio's view
09 The environmental awareness system: emotions
An emotion is a post-rationalization Rational or emotional?
But are advertisements like snakes?
Culture and the amygdala Herd behaviour How many emotions do we have?
Emotions and marketing
10 The 'state of body' system: homeostasis
Bio-measures and homeostasis
11 The 'state of mind' system, or moods and arousal 
Why the brain needs to control its levels of arousal Mood and time We continuously control our moods Bio-measures, mood and arousal
12 The evaluation system: pleasure 
'Dopaminic memories' of brands Bio-measures and dopamine
13 Personality 
Human 'personality' variation What is personality?
It is not survival of the fittest, but death to the unfit Personality and time What does this have to do with brands?
Marketing About brand personality Bio-measures and personality
14 Social systems and culture 
The neuro-basis of culture Why do we have an empathy circuit in the brain?
Prejudice The marketing error resulting from the empathy system Teaching feelings What is culture?
Culture and time Language Oatley and Jenkins's view about culture and emotions The global brand Culture is much more than countries Bio-measures and culture
15 Gender differences
The male/female brain 
16 Let's put it all together 
So how do we think we think?
'Thinking' involves a lot of brain process Making a choice A 'new' thought Feelings and time
17 Measuring the brain 
Single-cell measurement Electroencephalography (EEG)
Magnetocencephalography (MEG)
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)
Indirect measures of neural activity Very indirect measurements of brain activity
'Reading' the measures Creativity in designing brain scanning experiments
18 Increasing our brainpower - using neuroscience effectively by Graham Page
The current state of play Key questions to ask Implicit association measurement Eye-tracking Brainwave measurement Will neuroscience replace conventional research?
The future: integration When should neuroscience-based techniques be used?
Getting the best out of neuroscience

Part Three: Creating mischief 
19 On creating mischief 
The Hidden Persuaders
'The seductive allure of neuroscience explanations'
The buy button Sensationalism will increase
20 Buy-ology 
My view
21 The elusive subconscious
The big subconscious The subconscious and religion The confusion that arises when people willy-nilly talk about the subconsciousness This is a personal belief A justification for brain scanning projects?
What Freud said Respondents lying and our ethics

Part Four: Towards insights 
22 Read Montague's Pepsi Challenge 
About Read Montague The contribution of other sciences Montague on culture
23 Science: models and measurements 
The homunculus Decision making Models and measurements Models: the future

Part Five: Some marketing implications 
The marketing implications I chose The build-up of the next five chapters
24 Attention 
Why it is an important topic The issue Studying an exam or giving attention to an advertisement Death of the 30-second ad?
Some empirical data Why is this in a book about neuromarketing?
Inadvertent attention The response curve and re-cognition Re-cognition in non-fast-forwarded advertisements Media strategy implications Neuroscience and re-cognition (or repeat exposure)
Why repeat exposures to an advertisement?
But why does the level of awareness matter?
Can an advertisement have an effect without it being given attention?
The advertising effect of this Du Plessis's error Conclusions
25 The brand soma 
What I mean by the brand soma The brand soma and functionality Neurology What does the brand soma do?
Brand soma, rationality and functionality Fishbein and brand utility How the brand soma works in practice How this shows in perceptual maps Revisiting Fishbein The dopamine moment
'How would using the brand make you feel?'
Using the halo effect
26 Consumer decision making as heuristics 
What is an heuristic?
Neuromarketing and heuristics Feelings and heuristics BrandDynamics Different people have different heuristics in different situations Heuristics and questionnaire design Where does this lead us (marketers)?
27 Market segmentation 
Good segmentation should not be like this Some suggestions about segmentation studies Neuromarketing and segmentation Segmentation and neural studies-a chocolate example
28 Advertising budget, brand life cycle, synapses and brand soma 
Setting the budget Peter Field and AC Neilson The dynamic difference model Implications for 'percentage of revenue' budget This is a big ask of the brand Brand life cycles Jones's advertising intensity curve Brand life cycle: a self-fulfilling belief?
Optimizing advertising budgets The changing pieces of the puzzle

Part Six: My conclusions 
29 What this was all about 
From very small things to very big things
30 Is the future what it was? 
What the future will bring Summary implications for neuromarketing

References Index

Erik du Plessis is President of the Johannesburg-based research agency, Impact Information. Impact is now part of the Millward Brown Group, one of the world’s top 10 market research companies (owned by WPP) with 65 offices in 39 countries. He is also the author of The Advertised Mind.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 13, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    In 2005, marketing expert Erik du Plessis published The Advertis

    In 2005, marketing expert Erik du Plessis published The Advertised Mind, an approachable synthesis of neuroscience and marketing that explained how advertising shapes the brain’s responses and perceptions. In this book, a follow-up that you can understand on its own, du Plessis brings an even more focused treatment to the topic of neuromarketing, including commentary on the debate his earlier work provoked. He breaks his fairly dense material into brief chapters, so you can pick and choose according to your interests, ranging from cognitive science to branding, with many intriguing stops in between. getAbstract recommends du Plessis’s research, insights and engaging questions to marketing professionals and to readers interested in decision making, advertising, neuroscience and neuromarketing.

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