Brasil

Brasil

by The Manhattan Transfer
     
 

Tim Hauser likes to say that the Manhattan Transfer gets bored easily; hence the exploratory bent that has made them the most interesting vocal group in jazz (and maybe pop, too). Taking advantage of the then-cresting second Brazilian wave in North America while still going their own way musically, Brasil is the Transfer's most…  See more details below

Overview

Tim Hauser likes to say that the Manhattan Transfer gets bored easily; hence the exploratory bent that has made them the most interesting vocal group in jazz (and maybe pop, too). Taking advantage of the then-cresting second Brazilian wave in North America while still going their own way musically, Brasil is the Transfer's most daring and perhaps most emotionally moving album to date, an original fusion of the Transfer's vigorous vocal blend, Brazilian harmonic warmth, the textures of American synthesized pop/jazz and the rhythms of both nations. They rely mostly upon five songs from one of Brazil's finest post-bossa nova writers, Djavan, with two more from Ivan Lins and one apiece from Gilberto Gil and Milton Nascimento (the Transfer has impeccable taste in Brazilian writers), while going to all kinds of folk for English lyrics. The oddly percolating "Soul Food to Go" with Dada lyrics by, of all people, the notorious Doug Fieger of the Knack, makes a fine energetic prelude to an album that also frets about Big Brother, the suppression of freedom, and the destruction of the Amazon rain forest. Clearly the Transfer had been listening hard not only to the sound but also the fury of Brazil's composers; their causes become the Transfer's as well. Djavan's lovely "Capim" has the dual advantage of having both the composer on vocals and a distinguished visitor from the first Brazilian wave, Stan Getz, blowing urbane obligatos. The last cut, "Notes from the Underground," an angry cry of solidarity with a haunting Lins tune and bumping instrumental lines from the Brazilian group Uakti, aches in the memory for hours. Alas, the elusive Brasil baffled many of the Transfer's fans and started a long commercial slide for the group. Yet it belongs among their greatest achievements, right alongside Extensions and Vocalese.

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Product Details

Release Date:
11/17/1987
Label:
Imports
UPC:
0075678180323
catalogNumber:
1113517

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Manhattan Transfer   Primary Artist
Djavan   Vocals
Milton Nascimento   Vocals
Larry Williams   Synthesizer
Victor Biglione   Guitar
Stan Getz   Tenor Saxophone
Toninho Horta   Guitar
David Sanborn   Alto Saxophone
Janis Siegel   Vocals
Jeff Lorber   Synthesizer
Cheryl Bentyne   Vocals
Wayne Johnson   Guitar
Oscar Castro-Neves   Guitar
Frank Colon   Percussion
Djalma Corrèa   Percussion
Paulinho Da Costa   Percussion
Nathan East   Bass
Yaron Gershovsky   Piano
Tim Hauser   Vocals
Dann Huff   Guitar
Abraham Laboriel   Bass
Alan Paul   Vocals
John "J.R." Robinson   Drums
Buddy Williams   Drums
Jamal Joanes Dos Santos   Bass

Technical Credits

Janis Siegel   Arranger
Jeff Lorber   Arranger
Cheryl Bentyne   Arranger
Wagner Tiso   Arranger
Tim Hauser   Producer
Alan Paul   Arranger
Larry Williams   Arranger

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