The Brass Verdict (Harry Bosch Series #14 & Mickey Haller Series #2)

The Brass Verdict (Harry Bosch Series #14 & Mickey Haller Series #2)

4.1 563
by Michael Connelly, Peter Giles
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Things are finally looking up for defense attorney Mickey Haller. After two years of wrong turns, Haller is back in the courtroom. When Hollywood lawyer Jerry Vincent is murdered, Haller inherits his biggest case yet: the defense of Walter Elliott, a prominent studio executive accused of murdering his wife and her lover. But as Haller prepares for the case that

…  See more details below

Overview

Things are finally looking up for defense attorney Mickey Haller. After two years of wrong turns, Haller is back in the courtroom. When Hollywood lawyer Jerry Vincent is murdered, Haller inherits his biggest case yet: the defense of Walter Elliott, a prominent studio executive accused of murdering his wife and her lover. But as Haller prepares for the case that could launch him into the big time, he learns that Vincent's killer may be coming for him next.

Enter Harry Bosch. Determined to find Vincent's killer, he is not opposed to using Haller as bait. But as danger mounts and the stakes rise, these two loners realize their only choice is to work together.

Bringing together Michael Connelly's two most popular characters, The Brass Verdictis sure to be his biggest book yet.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Jonathan Yardley
Connelly brings Bosch and Haller together for the first time. Though the novel has some serious things to say about the workings, and occasional failures, of the jury system, it is primarily an entertainment, and more than welcome purely as such…Mickey is pumped, and, take my word for it, you will be too. Even though the way it ends is just a wee bit contrived, it's still a terrific ride.
—The Washington Post
Marilyn Stasio
If this were no more than a standard legal thriller, it would still be hard to put down. But for all the glee we might take in watching Mickey in action—psychoanalyzing the jury pool, shredding the credibility of a prosecution witness or faking civility to a powerful judge—The Brass Verdict is not just a conventional legal thriller but also a complicated morality play…Connelly is a master of plot engineering, and he maximizes the tension between Bosch ("the man on a mission") and Mickey ("the Lone Ranger") through a series of scams and subterfuges so dangerous they could cost Mickey his life or, at the very least, his lucrative case.
—The New York Times Book Review
Janet Maslin
The Brass Verdict has the sneaky metabolism of any Connelly book. It starts slowly, moves calmly, hides pertinent bits of information in plain sight and then abruptly ratchets up its energy for the denouement. The reader who wonders why this book cares so much about, say, the jury selection process will eventually see that Mr. Connelly had reason to do things this way. Even when Mickey painstakingly explains how his outline of a case resembles a Christmas tree, as he first establishes a trunk and branches, then hangs bits of evidence all over them, he describes something that proves more interesting than it may sound.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly

Arguably this country's best crime yarn spinner, Connelly has not only concocted an extremely clever plot for the second novel featuring Lincoln lawyer Mickey Haller, he has included his longtime series hero Harry Bosch as a supporting player in the who- and whydunit. The one less-than-perfect ingredient on this audio version is its reader, who, unlike former Connelly interpreters Len Carriou or Dick Hill, is not quite able to match the author's noir mood naturally. Peter Giles, an actor who has appeared in enough TV detective episodes to know better, starts off trying much too hard to sound hard-boiled. Haller is a lawyer, not Mike Hammer. But as the tricky tale plays out, with Haller and Bosch on the hunt for a homicidal jury manipulator, Giles tones down the toughness and settles in on a smartly paced and considerably more satisfying delivery. A Little, Brown hardcover (Reviews, Aug. 18). (Oct.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

Mickey Haller, last seen in The Lincoln Lawyer, returns to the courtroom in an unusual way here. Former colleague Jerry Vincent is murdered, and his caseload is dropped in Haller's lap. One of Vincent's high-profile cases involved a movie mogul accused of killing his wife and her lover in a jealous rage. As Haller prepares the mogul's defense, he discovers that Vincent's killer might have chosen him as the next target. Haller must trust Harry Bosch, the police officer investigating Vincent's murder, if he is going to survive and trust his instincts if he is going to succeed in convincing a jury of his client's innocence. Connelly is firing on all cylinders in this epic page-turner. The intriguing story line, the chance to view Bosch from another perspective, and Haller's reappearance as a main character add up to a fantastic read. One of the best thrillers of the year and a mandatory purchase for all public libraries. [See Prepub Alert, LJ6/15/08; $1 million marketing campaign.]
—Jeff Ayers

Kirkus Reviews
The answer to every Connelly fan's dream: Hieronymus Bosch meets the Lincoln Lawyer. Away from the courtroom for two years after he was shot (The Lincoln Lawyer, 2005), Mickey Haller plans a gradual return to the legal practice he runs from the back seat of his car. But the plan is abruptly accelerated by the murder of his colleague Jerry Vincent, who designated Mickey as the attorney who'd take over his list of clients if anything happened to him. One client is a high-profile defendant guaranteed to put Mickey back on the map. Hollywood studio head Walter Elliot is accused of killing his much younger wife Mitzi, who evidently took the recent vesting of her prenup as the signal to file for divorce, and her even younger lover, interior decorator Johan Rilz, who wasn't nearly as gay as Mitzi had hinted. Before Mickey can claim victory, however, he'll have to explain away the gunpowder residue on his client's hands; he'll have to figure out what secret the client is hiding from him that makes him so sure he's going to get off; and he'll have to be ready to go to trial in ten days. While he's racing around trying to fit the pieces together, he'll cross swords repeatedly with Connelly's long-running hero, Det. Harry Bosch, the 33-year veteran of Robbery-Homicide (The Overlook, 2007, etc.) who's investigating Vincent's murder. Despite twists aplenty, the trial drags on for so many pages that savvy readers will solve the mystery ahead of Mickey. But his relationship with Bosch, whom he doesn't recognize as his half brother, is satisfyingly resourceful-by turns wary, competitive, complementary, cooperative and mutually predatory. Even if the case is less than baffling, Connelly brings his twosleuths together in a way that honors them both. Agent: Philip Spitzer/Philip Spitzer Literary Agency
Janet Maslin - New York Times
"The Brass Verdict has the sneaky metabolism of any Connelly book. It starts slowly, moves calmly, hides pertinent bits of information in plain sight and then abruptly ratchets up its energy for the denouement....In the midst of this new story, Mickey rebounds with a vengeance....Like Harry Bosch's mojo, Mickey Haller's is liable to work well for a long time."
Robin Vidimos - Denver Post
"Connelly once again hits it out of the park in the tightly written, fast-paced and sharply imagined The Brass Verdict....Connelly builds to some breathtaking twists before all comes to a close. And a more perfect end to the maze he has drawn is difficult to imagine."
Jonathan Yardley - Washington Post
"If at first encounter Connelly seems primarily an exceptionally accomplished writer of crime novels, at closer examination he is also a mordant and knowing chronicler of the world in which crime takes place, i.e., our world....A terrific ride."
Tom Alderman - Huffington Post
When author Connelly is on his game, he's unbeatable for unexpected plot turns and compelling characters. With "the Brass Verdict," he is in top form...Actor Peter Giles drives the story with pitch-perfect narration and pacing that heightens the whole experience...Bottom Line: Engrossing personalities inhabit a crackerjack murder mystery. For audio listeners this is a battery drainer. You won't want to turn it off.
From the Publisher
When author Connelly is on his game, he's unbeatable for unexpected plot turns and compelling characters. With "the Brass Verdict," he is in top form...Actor Peter Giles drives the story with pitch-perfect narration and pacing that heightens the whole experience...Bottom Line: Engrossing personalities inhabit a crackerjack murder mystery. For audio listeners this is a battery drainer. You won't want to turn it off.—Tom Alderman, Huffington Post"

Michael Connely's twentieth novel as narrated by newcomer Peter Giles is a humdinger....Gile's hoarse, whispery voice crackles when he's Bosch and is authorative as Haller. Despite their differences, the story resolves in a way that makes listeners eager for the next installment, especially if it's performed by Peter Giles."—AudioFile

Jeff Ayers
Connelly is firing on all cylinders in this epic page-turner. The intriguing story line, the chance to view Bosch from another perspective, and Haller's reappearance as a main character add up to a fantastic read. One of the best thrillers of the year.
Library Journal
Robin Vidimos
Connelly once again hits it out of the park in the tightly written, fast-paced and sharply imagined The Brass Verdict....Connelly builds to some breathtaking twists before all comes to a close. And a more perfect end to the maze he has drawn is difficult to imagine.
Denver Post
Tom Alderman
When author Connelly is on his game, he's unbeatable for unexpected plot turns and compelling characters. With "the Brass Verdict," he is in top form...Actor Peter Giles drives the story with pitch-perfect narration and pacing that heightens the whole experience...Bottom Line: Engrossing personalities inhabit a crackerjack murder mystery. For audio listeners this is a battery drainer. You won't want to turn it off.
Huffington Post

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781600243974
Publisher:
Hachette Audio
Publication date:
10/14/2008
Series:
Harry Bosch Series, #14
Edition description:
Abridged, 5 CDs
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 5.80(h) x 0.80(d)

Videos

What People are saying about this

Tom Alderman
When author Connelly is on his game, he's unbeatable for unexpected plot turns and compelling characters. With "the Brass Verdict," he is in top form...Actor Peter Giles drives the story with pitch-perfect narration and pacing that heightens the whole experience...Bottom Line: Engrossing personalities inhabit a crackerjack murder mystery. For audio listeners this is a battery drainer. You won't want to turn it off.
— Huffington Post

Meet the Author

Michael Connelly, a #1 New York Times bestselling novelist and a former journalist, has won numerous crime fiction prizes. He lives in Florida.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Sarasota, Florida
Date of Birth:
July 21, 1956
Place of Birth:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Education:
B.A. in Journalism, University of Florida, 1980
Website:
http://www.michaelconnelly.com

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Brass Verdict (Harry Bosch Series #14 & Mickey Haller Series #2) 4.1 out of 5 based on 2 ratings. 563 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Michael Connelly's "The Brass Verdict" is a well-written, taunt, suspenseful read. Defense attorney, Michael "Mickey" Haller inherits his murdered friend's high profile law firm. This no doubt comes with a high price complete with the case of the decade involving a Hollywood producer accused of murdering his wife and her lover. If that's not enough, enter Detective Harry Bosch who then squares off against Mickey Haller. It's Bosch versus Haller and neither is backing down. Haller then unwittingly becomes the bait and the story really breaks loose. "The Brass Verdict" is an enjoyable read. The narrative is strong with an intriguing storyline and the characters are woven well throughout the book. It begins a bit slow up to about page 90 giving the reader a background of all of the cases. It feels at times that you're an employee at a law firm instead of a reader. If you are a bit bored, hang in there because it definitely picks up. I would consider this book a suspense or mystery instead of a thriller. The only downside was that I guessed a major part of what was going to happen by page 100. However, there are still some great twists to give a satisfying ending to the story. Also, to all of you Bosch fans out there, beware; he is definitely a secondary character in this story. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a great suspenseful read. -Jennifer Chase, author of thriller "Compulsion"
MatthewDGooch More than 1 year ago
This book had me hooked from page one! The more and more I read the harder and harder it was for me to stop. The large number of twists and turns kept me reading until two in the morning. If you are a Connelly fan I urge...or rather...DEMAND that you read this book. You will not be disappointed.
Terra More than 1 year ago
Michael Connelly's 'The Brass Verdict' is, in my opinion, an amazing feat. First, let me confess that I am not a huge fan of 'lawyer' novels. That aside, I read Connelly's 'The Lincoln Lawyer' last year and was completely bowled over. With super tight plotting and no obscure judicial rumblings, Connelly deftly sliced and diced his way through a gripping tale. Now with his new book, 'The Brass Verdict', I am standing up cheering for more... yeah, you heard right. And I'm the reader who doesn't like lawyer books!

His main character, Counselor Mickey Haller is twice divorced but not bitter; likable in a principled way but willing to bend the rules and finally, he's kind of a wuss when it comes down to violence and sometimes it does come down to violence. All the supporting characters like his ex-wives, his investigator friend and even his chauffeur read like real people who help drive the plot forward, not just clichés who hang like drapes in the background.

His villains have been done before but, but what villains haven¿t? At least they ring true in the context of the story and there are always a few clever red herrings or plot twists scattered throughout, plus a few classic OMGs at the end. However, in The Brass Verdict, there's another unique twist: Harry Bosch, Connelly¿s stalwart hero in a dozen previous books, shows up as the head detective investigating a studio mogul's wife's murder. What is unusual is that we see a completely new Harry Bosch through Haller's eyes, and believe me, it's not one we've seen before, what with the "flat, cold eyes" and a nasty bag of tricks he uses to try and trick Haller into betraying the hallowed lawyer/client privilege. Things get even edgier when Haller¿s little girl wants to know why he always trys to get the bad guys out of jail, something all of us sometimes wonder about defense attorneys. There are also subplots of FBI subterfuge, mafia involvement, surfer hijinks but thankfully, no gooey love story tagged on to appease the dewy-eyed reader.

Indeed, there are a lot of courtroom scenes in this book, but they dovetail nicely into the plot and Haller's superb first person narrative plants you firmly at the defense table with all the info you need to have a pleasant and not overly taxing read. I think the verdict¿s clearly in - grab The Lincoln Lawyer first, read it, then go out and buy The Brass Verdict. You won¿t regret it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I discovered this book (and author) while at Thrillerfest, a thriller writers workshop held in NYC for the past several years. During breaks between sessions, Barnes and Noble opens a store for the guests, both writers and speakers. Last year, I rubbed elbows with bestselling author, Steve Martini, who was checking out the competition and buying books like the rest of us mere mortals. He picked up "Brass Verdict" and I followed his lead. "Brass Verdict" is a gritty legal thriller featuring a lawyer (Mickey Haller) and a police detective (Harry Bosch) who bring scum to justice. Each character has been featured in a Connelly series of his own, but in "Brass Verdict," the two work on the same case, not always together. Bosch is the investigating detective for the murder of a lawyer and Haller inherits the dead man's practice. That inheritance places Haller in danger and also gives him a chance to try his biggest case yet. Bosch will stop at nothing to catch the lawyer's killer and Haller just might be his prime suspect. Bosch and Haller are both flawed in their own grumpy, wrinkled way, each has interesting baggage and the pairing of the two characters is terrific! In the big reveal near the end of the book, we find out why they have been brought together in "Brass Verdict." The novel is so well crafted that I became a big Connelly fan and will now go back to the beginning of each of the series to find out how the characters may have changed in the intervening years. Great read! Rated R for mature readers
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was the first Michael Connelly book I read where the main character was not only Harry Bosch but shared by another character. It just proved to me that Michael Connelly's books are just as good regardless who his main character's are. He keeps you on the edge of your seat, and keeps you guessing all the way through the book. He has become one of my favorite authors. After I read the 1st Harry Bosch novel, I was hooked and proceeded to read every one of his books prior to this one. I cannot wait for the next.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book was simply excellent; I was surprised by some of the negative reviews. This is not a Bosch book, it¿s more of a Haller book, HB is there as a supporting cast. However, it was nice to see how the story was woven with both characters in the book. The book reads like early Grisham, and then some. If there¿s a candidate for a movie from the Connelly series, this is it.
Twink More than 1 year ago
Mickey Haller first appeared in Connelly's 2005 novel The Lincoln Lawyer. I had followed the Harry Bosch detective series ( 13 up to now ) since 1993 and wasn't too sure about a 'new' character, but was happily proven wrong. Haller is back in The Brass Verdict. The best part? Harry Bosch is featured as well!

Defense lawyer Mickey Haller inherits a dead colleague's law practice and with it what could be his biggest case ever. His client, Walter Elliot, wants the case to proceed quickly, so Haller is playing catchup. But is his client holding something back? The dead colleague, Jerry Vincent, was murdered and Detective Harry Bosch is on the case. Can Vincent's murder and Elliot's case be tied together? Haller and Bosch may have to put their heads together for this one. The ending was fantastic setting up what I hope will be many more books where both characters are featured.

Connelly's writing skillfully captures both courtroom and police investigation scenes and dialogue. The legal aspect is never dry and the investigation side always keeps you guessing. His characters are believable and human. The personal lives and relationships of the main and supporting characters greatly enhance the whole storyline. It was interesting to see Harry Bosch through Haller's eyes. It was a bit of a different Bosch than I have become accustomed to. But that too is part of Connelly's skill - keeping us on our toes and never, never letting us become bored of his writing!

I always anticipate starting a new book by one of my favourite authors and try to stretch it out and 'make it last'. But yet again it didn't work - I burned through this new release in just over a day. Sigh.....another year till the next one.
ReviewYourBook.com More than 1 year ago
Michael Connelly
Little, Brown, & Co., 2008
ISBN: 9780316166294
Reviewed by Debra Gaynor for ReviewYourBook.com, 11/08
4 Stars
Mickey Haller and Harry Bosch together¿.
Michael Connelly brings two of his famous characters together in one powerful mystery. Mickey Haller is a defense lawyer working on the biggest case of his career. Harry Bosch is a LAPD Detective investigating the murder of Jerry Vincent. When the killer goes after Haller, the two men join forces to solve the case.
Mickey is a lovable sleaze, and Bosch is abrasive; when paired together they are a dynamic duo. I do not usually read lawyer books, but I made an exception this time. I am glad I did. Connelly gives his characters depth. Their personalities are strong. The plot is multifaceted and stimulating. It kept me on the edge of my seat. The ending had a surprise twist. Fans of courtroom drama will not want to miss The Brass Verdict.
Carstairs38 More than 1 year ago
Back in the Court Saddle Mickey Haller has taken a year off from practicing law for personal reasons, and he's just about to come back when he gets an unusual phone call.  His friend and colleague Jerry Vincent has been murdered, and Mickey has inherited his practice. While the police, lead by LA detective Harry Bosch, think that one of Vincent's cases might have gotten him killed, Mickey's focus is on picking up the 31 cases that have fallen into his lap, including this year's "Trial of the Century."  Walter Elliot, chairman of Archway Studios, is accused of killing his wife and her lover.  Mickey is happy with the high profile case and the income, but he's surprised by just how much Elliot wants to run the case, right down to not delaying the trial at all.  Can he will the case?  Is he in danger from Vincent's killer? When I read Mickey's first case several years back, I always intended to read more of them.  Now that I've read the next, I wish I hadn't waited so long.  The plot is wonderful with some surprising and brilliant twists and turns.  The characters are equally well drawn.  I love Mickey and the rest of his circle of friends.  Bosch didn't come across the best here, which is interesting since I know he stars in author Michael Connelly's other series.  At some point, I'll have to get more background on him. If you just saw the movie and haven't moved on, don't hesitate.  This book will have you turning pages far into the night.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As an avid mystery reader and placing Michael Connelly in my top five authors list, I was disappointed in all aspects of this book. The character development lagged, their was a lack of humor, and the plot was not suspenseful. Lincoln Lawyer by Michael Connelly is one of my favorite books. I have given it as gifts and reread it myself. Here's hoping Michael's next book is up to Lincoln Lawyer standards!
cewilch More than 1 year ago
I would be willing to say that I think Michael Connelly is one of the best mystery/crime/courtroom drama writers in the world. His book are always well thought out, expertly written, and very engaging to the reader. I finished this book in record time as I was trapped between the pages from beginning to end. I almost feel like I need to re-read THE LINCOLN LAWYER to remember correctly what happened to Mickey Haller. I liked the suprise revealed between Mickey Haller and Harry Bosch near the books end. I am eagerly awaiting the author's next book.
cmt457 More than 1 year ago
I was asked to read an excerpt several months ago, and was so captivated that I could hardly wait for the book to be released. If you liked the Lincoln Lawyer, you will love this one. Connelly's characters are so interesting and off-beat, that it takes the reader on a great journey, both personally and story wise
Pido7 More than 1 year ago
Let me begin by saying that I am a card carrying, dyed in the wool, Harry Bosch fan! I've read all of the series and couldn't wait for this one to come out. I was standing in the driveway waiting for "Mr. Brown" to deliver this book (audio book). That being said, I felt a little disappointed in this one. The plot seemed contrived to me and left me wanting more explanation. A superior court judge could pull $1000 bills out of her toilet and certainly wouln't threaten her livelyhood with the likes of Vincent. Come on, Mike! And while on the subject of believability, Hachett Audio, what ever made you think that the great Harry Bosch would speak with a lisp!!! Poor choice of reader for this genre. Not Michael Connelly's best effort in my opionion, with a focus on Mikey Haller and Harry Bosch, it just watered it down to no focus. Sorry, Michael, but I will still be waiting in the driveway for the next one so keep on keeping on.
Anonymous 4 months ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As soon as you think you have figured it out. Michael Connelly throws in another twist
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BREID324 More than 1 year ago
I wish I had been smart enough to start reading Mike Connelly's books in order. But not to worry, he teams them all up beautifully. I have to say with this book, I ACTUALLY figured out part of the plot which I ordinarily can't do, but in spite of this, I just love this book and when I read the negative reviews, can't understand them AT ALL. If you want a GREAT all-'round book, (which you can actually learn from), this is for you. If you want mediocre, well, what can I say??!! Go buy a romance novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I LOVE Michael the racecar!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
eBook-Aficionado More than 1 year ago
Having enjoyed the Lincoln Lawyer so thoroughly, the Brass Verdict seemed to fall a notch below. For all Bosch fans out there, my apologies, but he comes across rather wooden. The familial relationship between him and Haler struck me as contrived -- couldn't the two guys forge a bond for other reasons? In any case, I still found the book worth a read, bringing along all of Connelly's expert plotting and pace.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago