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Bratislava Pressburg Pozsony
     

Bratislava Pressburg Pozsony

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by A. Robert Neurath
 

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Unknown to many, Bratislava, presently the capital of Slovakia, used to be in the Habsburg Austro�Hungarian Monarchy, a multi�national city. German, Hungarian, and Slovak speaking residents represented the majority of the population, explaining why the city had multiple names � Pressburg, Pozsony, and Bratislava. But it took a long time before the Jewish community in

Overview

Unknown to many, Bratislava, presently the capital of Slovakia, used to be in the Habsburg Austro�Hungarian Monarchy, a multi�national city. German, Hungarian, and Slovak speaking residents represented the majority of the population, explaining why the city had multiple names � Pressburg, Pozsony, and Bratislava. But it took a long time before the Jewish community in this city was given the same privileges and rights that other religious groups enjoyed. Legal emancipation of Jews was achieved in 1867, after the conversion of the Empire into the Dual Austro�Hungarian Monarchy (Bratislava being in the Hungarian part).

Having lived in this city for thirty�one years, author A. Robert Neurath, through this book, valiantly attempts to capture the story of the emancipated Bratislava Jews and their vital contributions to the city�s economy, culture, education, and political life. A richly layered book about history and non�religious endeavors, BRATISLAVA PRESSBURG POZSONY: Jewish Secular Endeavors (1867-1938) offers a fascinating narration that begins with architecture providing documents �written in stone�, and continues with the arts, sports, politics, business, and medicine. It is an informative page�turner perfect for teachers, students, and anyone who wants to learn about the history of a captivating city and its extinguished and dispersed Jewish population.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781453596128
Publisher:
Xlibris Corporation
Publication date:
12/20/2010
Pages:
324
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.73(d)

Meet the Author

A. Robert Neurath, Ph.D., was born in Bratislava, Czechoslovakia. He graduated from the Technical University (Bratislava) in 1957. He immigrated to the United States in 1964, and was awarded a doctorate in microbiology at the Technical University, Vienna, Austria, in 1968. For over forty�five years, he was engaged in research on viruses: influenza, rabies, Hepatitis B, the human immunodeficiency virus I, and on vaccines against these viruses. His studies resulted in about 250 scientific papers, including monographs and book chapters, and twenty�three patents. After the demise of communism, he had the opportunity to visit Bratislava and to read new books dealing with the city�s past Jewish community. These publications, as judged by the author, have given insufficient credit to the secular endeavors and accomplishments of the local Jewish professionals and businessmen before the onset of World War II. The author strives to rectify these apparent deficiencies, relying mostly on pre�war information and input from family and friends. The present book is the result of these efforts.

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Bratislava Pressburg Pozsony 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Egon_Friedler More than 1 year ago
"Semanario Hebreo" 05/05/2011 (Montevideo, Uruguay) [Weekly Hebrew] RECALLING THE JEWISH BRATISLAVA By Egon Friedler Review of "Bratislava - Pressburg - Pozsony: Jewish secular Endeavors (1867-1938) - A. Robert Neurath - 316 pgs. Edit.2010 USA Very few people remember today that Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia, was one of the oldest centers of Jewish life in Europe. A book by a descendant of one of the most prominent Jewish families of this city has decided to recall in a book edited and richly documented extensively. The author is A. Robert Neurath, who was born in Bratislava, graduated from the Technical University of that city in that city in 1957 and in 1968 earned a doctorate in microbiology in Vienna. For 45 years he devoted himself to the study of viruses in causing diseases and published some 250 scientific papers and registered 23 patents. With the fall of communism visited his hometown and was able to read several papers on the history of the Jewish community. In his view, these publications are too focused on religious issues and were greedy in their references to the achievements of professionals, artists, intellectuals and Jewish businessmen and their role within the multinational society of Bratislava. Therefore, wanted to make this personal testimony based on both written and oral sources. 2 As indicated by A. Robert Neurath in his introduction, during the Austro-Hungarian Habsburg multinational Bratislava was a city in which residents Germans, Hungarians and Slovaks were the majority. Therefore, the city had three names: Pressburg, Bratislava and Pozsony (the last Hungarian name). The legal emancipation of the Jews took place in 1867 after the conversion of Empire in the Austro-Hungarian Dual Monarchy. Bratislava remained in the Hungarian and the Hungarian Parliament approved full civil and political rights for Jews. In 1895, the Jewish religion was recognized as "accepted religion" with a status similar to that of the various Christian groups. This allowed a relatively successful integration of Jews into Hungarian society and many Jews were soon to excel in medicine, science, culture, business and political life. This situation changed with the disintegration of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy in 1918 and except for an unstable transition period, until the fall of the liberal regime in 1938 and Czechoslovakia in the income of the sphere of influence of German Nazism. During the first 38 years of the twentieth century remained fully multi-ethnic character of Bratislava and thanks to the liberal and open attitude of the president of Czechoslovakia, Tomas Masaryk (1850-1957) the Jews had no obstacles to develop its activities in the most various disciplines and contributed very significantly to enriching the lives of the city. 3 This contribution is reminiscent of the book, he rescues a series of individual stories, many with a tragic end during the Nazi era and World War II. But above all, the work of Dr.Neurath is the evocation of a lively and creative community that comes alive through the numerous illustrations of excellent quality that provides the volume. The book begins with the important contribution of the Jews from Bratislava to architecture. Among the names mentioned include Louis I. Khan (1901-1974), Vojtech Bustin (19805-1944) Geyduscheck Imrich (1898-1944) Jiri Grossmann (1892-1957) desided Quastler (1889-1944) Skutecky Alexander (1883-1944) Spitzer Emerich (1904-1943) E