The Brave Bulls

The Brave Bulls

by Tom Lea
     
 

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One of Texas's true renaissance men, Tom Lea (1907-2001) was already a noted artist, muralist, and book illustrator when he published his first novel, The Brave Bulls, in 1949. This suspenseful story of bullfighting in Mexico, elegantly illustrated by the author, spent several weeks on the New York Times bestseller list and was hailed by

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Overview

One of Texas's true renaissance men, Tom Lea (1907-2001) was already a noted artist, muralist, and book illustrator when he published his first novel, The Brave Bulls, in 1949. This suspenseful story of bullfighting in Mexico, elegantly illustrated by the author, spent several weeks on the New York Times bestseller list and was hailed by Time magazine as the best first novel of the year. It also won the Carr P. Collins Award from the Texas Institute of Letters, went through numerous reprints and translations, and became a 1951 movie starring Mel Ferrer and Anthony Quinn.

Editorial Reviews

New York Times Book Review
"This is bullfighting from the inside, the way it looks to the people who make it a profession, and not even Ernest Hemingway at his best has ever done a better job of getting the whole thing on paper."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780292747333
Publisher:
University of Texas Press
Publication date:
05/15/2002
Series:
Southwestern Writers Collection
Edition description:
1ST UNIVER
Pages:
296
Product dimensions:
5.32(w) x 8.04(h) x 0.80(d)

What People are saying about this

James Magnuson
"The Brave Bulls has long been considered a classic of Southwestern literature. The writing is intensely visual and precise, the narrative stirring, and the characters both quirky and engaging. . . . Tom Lea writes with a painter’s eye and a deep affection for Mexican culture."

Meet the Author

Tom Lea’s other books include both fiction (The Wonderful Country, The Primal Yoke, and The Hands of Cantú) and nonfiction (The King Ranch, A Picture Gallery, and In the Crucible of the Sun). He also served as a correspondent for Life magazine in the South Pacific during World War II. At the end of his life, he became friends with soon-to-be President George W. Bush, who used Lea’s sunrise side of the mountain image in his acceptance speech at the 2000 Republican National Convention.

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