Overview

Europe was in the throes of World War II, and when America joined the fighting, Ernie Pyle went along. Long before television beamed daily images of combat into our living rooms, Pyle’s on-the-spot reporting gave the American public a firsthand view of what war was like for the boys on the front. Pyle followed the soldiers into the trenches, battlefields, field hospitals, and beleaguered cities of Europe. What he witnessed he described with a clarity, sympathy, and grit that gave the public back home an immediate...
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Brave Men

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Overview

Europe was in the throes of World War II, and when America joined the fighting, Ernie Pyle went along. Long before television beamed daily images of combat into our living rooms, Pyle’s on-the-spot reporting gave the American public a firsthand view of what war was like for the boys on the front. Pyle followed the soldiers into the trenches, battlefields, field hospitals, and beleaguered cities of Europe. What he witnessed he described with a clarity, sympathy, and grit that gave the public back home an immediate sense of the foot soldier’s experience. There were really two wars, John Steinbeck wrote in Time magazine: one of maps and logistics, campaigns, ballistics, divisions, and regiments and the other a "war of the homesick, weary, funny, violent, common men who wash their socks in their helmets, complain about the food, whistle at Arab girls, or any girls for that matter, and bring themselves through as dirty a business as the world has ever seen and do it with humor and dignity and courage—and that is Ernie Pyle’s war." This collection of Pyle’s columns detailing the fighting in Europe in 1943–44 brings that war—and the living, and dying, moments of history—home to us once again.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Brave Men is a collection of journalist Pyle's newspaper columns from 1943 and 1944, in which he details the fighting in Europe primarily from the perspective of the common U.S. G.I. This angle of reporting brought the front-line war back to the families of those serving in the armed forces and endeared Pyle to the troops. An essential piece of Americana for all collections. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
From The Critics
Ernie Pyle was one of the most effective and well known battlefield correspondents of World War II. Pyle's on-the-spot reporting gave the American public a firsthand view of what war was like for their boys on the front lines he followed American service men into the trenches, battlefield combats, field hospitals, and war ravaged cities of Europe. What he witnessed he was able to vividly record and describe with clarity, sympathy, and grit to give his readership an immediate and accurate sense of the foot soldier's experience. Brave Men is a collection of Pyle's wartime newspaper columns detailing the 1943-44 fighting in Europe and endures as a fitting monument to both one correspondent's courage and journalistic expertise and the battlefield experiences of a generation of young American soldiers in the European theater. Tragically, when Pyle went to the South Pacific to continue his wartime reportage, a sniper's bullet took his life in 1945. Brave Men is an essential title for any personal, academic, or community library World War II collection.
Kirkus Reviews
The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist (1900-45) collected his work from WWII in two bestselling volumes, this second published in 1944, a year before Pyle was killed by a sniper's bullet on Okinawa. In his fine introduction to this new edition, G. Kurt Piehler (History/Univ. of Tennessee at Knoxville) celebrates Pyle's "dense, descriptive style" and his unusual feel for the quotidian GI experience-a personal and human side to war left out of reporting on generals and their strategies. Though Piehler's reminder about wartime censorship seems beside the point, his biographical context-Pyle was escaping a troubled marriage-is valuable. "Kirkus", at the time, noted the hoopla over Pyle (Pulitzer, hugely popular syndicated column, BOMC hype) and decided it was all worth it: "the book doesn't let the reader down." Pyle, of course, captures "the human qualities" of men in combat, but he also provides "an extraordinary sense of the scope of the European war fronts, the variety of services involved, the men and their officers." Despite Piehler's current argument that Pyle ignored much of the war (particularly the seamier stuff), "Kirkus "in 1944 marveled at how much he was able to cover. Back then, we thought, "here's a book that needs no selling." Nowadays, a firm push might be needed to renew interest in this classic of modern journalism.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803255920
  • Publisher: UNP - Bison Books
  • Publication date: 4/1/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 513
  • Sales rank: 134,995
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Ernie Pyle worked as managing editor of the Washington News and later became a roving journalist for Scripps Howard Newspapers. After many years following the fighting in Europe, Pyle traveled to the South Pacific, where a sniper's bullet took his life in 1945. G. Kurt Piehler is an assistant professor of history at the University of Tennessee and the author of Remembering War the American Way.
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Table of Contents

Sicily - June-September, 1943
1 Invasion Prelude 3
2 The Armada Sails 13
3 D-Day: - Sicily 21
4 The Navy Stands By 36
5 Medics and Casualties 48
6 The Engineers' War 62
7 Campaigning 80
8 Sicily Conquered 92
Italy - December, 1943-April, 1944
9 Artillerymen 101
10 Personalities and Asides 126
11 Mountain Fighting 151
12 Dive Bombers 167
13 The Fabulous Infantry 193
14 Light Bombers 217
15 LST Cruise 238
16 Anzio-Nettuno 246
17 Beachhead Fighters 266
18 Supply Line 288
19 Hospital Ship 303
20 Farewell to Italy 309
England - April-May, 1944
21 This England 315
22 Brass Hats 325
23 The Flying Wedge 339
24 Stand By 360
France - June-September, 1944
25 The Whistle Blows 375
26 On the Road to Berlin 384
27 Vive La France 394
28 American Ack-Ack 406
29 Street Fighting 419
30 Reconnoiterings 433
31 Ordnance 443
32 Break-Through 456
33 Hedgerow Fighting 466
34 Paris 482
35 A Last Word 491
Index of Persons and Places 495
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 3 of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 23, 2010

    The Human faces of War.

    An excellent account of the human faces of war. Ernie Pyle's observations
    are the best examples of journalism on people caught up in the huge
    conflict of World War II. Highly recommended for style and substance!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2001

    Must Reading

    Having been in VietNam combat some 30 years ago, Ernies book, Brave Men made me feel like I was in a picnic. Every Officer and enlisted should read this book. If we cannot be humbled by the rawness of war, we better think twice obout fighting for freedom. Brave Men clearly illustrated our humanity of living and dying and the price we pay. It is too bad so many of us take freedom for granted and treat our veterans as subhuman.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 3 of 4 Customer Reviews

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