Brave Squish Rabbit

Brave Squish Rabbit

by Katherine Battersby
     
 

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Who's afraid of the dark?
Not Squish!

Squish Rabbit is a very small rabbit, and he's afraid of lots of things. Like storms. And chickens (you would be too, if you were small!). And the dark. Especially the dark. But when he goes to meet his good friend Twitch the squirrel one evening, he can't find her. She's missing! And it's getting dark! Squish knows he…  See more details below

Overview

Who's afraid of the dark?
Not Squish!

Squish Rabbit is a very small rabbit, and he's afraid of lots of things. Like storms. And chickens (you would be too, if you were small!). And the dark. Especially the dark. But when he goes to meet his good friend Twitch the squirrel one evening, he can't find her. She's missing! And it's getting dark! Squish knows he must be brave to find her, but it takes all of his courage . . . to discover that the dark can be magical, especially when filled with stars.

With playful text and adorable illustrations, Brave Squish Rabbit will encourage young readers to face their fears.

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times
The story Battersby tells is deceptively simple, but it conveys valuable ideas—for instance, that distraction, companionship and resourcefulness can help us to combat fearfulness. And acting brave even when you don't feel brave makes a difference too. These are somber messages, but framing them around a story about a cute bunny and his squirrel friend makes it a lot easier for young children to bear.
—Pamela Paul
From the Publisher
Praise for Brave Squish Rabbit by Katherine Battersby:

"A little humor that goes a long way toward conquering big fears." —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"Children will love how friendship trumps terror when the two reunite...Consider pairing this charming book with Patricia Polacco's Thunder Cake(Philomel, 1990), Kevin Henkes's Sheila Rae, the Brave (Greenwillow, 1987), and Ed Emberley's Go Away, Big Green Monster! (Little, Brown, 1992)." —School Library Journal

“[Battersby] creates expressive characters...and Squish's world is a delightful collage of felt trees, giant chickens (made from yellow feathers), and torn-paper landscapes.” —Publishers Weekly

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Appealing Squish Rabbit returns for a new adventure. Being little, he is afraid of many things: storms, chickens, and especially the dark. He just cannot hide from it. One day, when Squish goes to meet his squirrel friend Twitch at their tree house, he finds only a note that he cannot read. As he worries about Twitch, it grows darker outside, and Squish gets frightened inside. Bravely, Squish decides to set off into the dark to find his friend, with a firefly-filled lantern to guide him. After going through a storm and past what might very well be a chicken, Squish sees Twitch and the dark is no longer so scary. Being brave has made him feel "much bigger." Our hero looks like a softly stuffed toy, all white inside a heavy black outline. Battersby creates simple collages of ink, watercolor, textiles, and digital manipulation on solid, mostly dark backgrounds to emphasize Squish's emotional state. The strong design of the pages enhances the ordinary story. Extra shine on the fireflies and Squish on the jacket adds attraction. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—In Squish Rabbit (Viking, 2011), the bunny's big problem was being little. Here, he is dealing with being afraid of things around him. He is frightened of the dark, of course, and of storms, but he is also afraid of chickens. In this perfect example of how a picture book relies on the art to help tell a fully formed story, exactly why he's scared of chickens is never stated. Instead, the art shows poor teeny tiny Squish Rabbit amid a forest of tall, moving chicken legs, and youngsters will immediately understand that he is fearful of being trampled. Squish Rabbit heads off to meet up with his friend Twitch, but she isn't where he looks. Worried, Squish Rabbit finally heads off to find her despite it being pitch dark and a raging storm, and he even thinks he sees chickens. Children will love how friendship trumps terror when the two reunite. The richly colored illustrations have strong patterns and textures while Squish Rabbit and Twitch are outlined in bold strokes of black ink. Consider pairing this charming book with Patricia Polacco's Thunder Cake (Philomel, 1990), Kevin Henkes's Sheila Rae, the Brave (Greenwillow, 1987), and Ed Emberley's Go Away, Big Green Monster! (Little, Brown, 1992).—Joan Kindig, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA
Kirkus Reviews
Squish, a tiny rabbit, lives with towering fears: of storms, chickens and the dark. Adorable, sensitive, and squish-ably vulnerable, this bunny cowers and covers his eyes when confronted by these worrisome scenarios. Nebulous, sometimes untraceable fears haunt little heads, and Battersby's simple story of confrontation will help many young readers subdue their own anxieties. It takes a rescue mission (where's Squish's best buddy Twitch?) for Squish to muster the courage to face lightning, feathers and night. The critters' rounded figures, rendered in thick, fluid black lines, bestow them with an irresistibly cuddly cuteness--even though they appear as flat as one-dimensional pancakes. Battersby incorporates surprising multimedia accents throughout (gold foil lightning bolts, chickens constructed entirely out of yellow feathers, textured papers, patterned fabrics) that give children the chance to hunt for the unexpected. Squish's search for Twitch, however, and the subsequent systematic dismantling of each phobia, feel quite familiar. Luckily, notes of persistently sweet, quirky humor save this book from predictability. The animals sleep in socks pinned to a clothesline; Twitch writes a note in a paw-print script utterly indecipherable to Squish; their acorn and carrot snacks appear laughably gargantuan; and don't even get started giggling about how chickens could possibly raise goose bumps! A little humor that goes a long way toward conquering big fears. (Picture book. 2-5)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101647820
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
09/27/2012
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
40
File size:
7 MB
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Praise for Brave Squish Rabbit by Katherine Battersby:

"A little humor that goes a long way toward conquering big fears." —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"Children will love how friendship trumps terror when the two reunite...Consider pairing this charming book with Patricia Polacco's Thunder Cake(Philomel, 1990), Kevin Henkes's Sheila Rae, the Brave (Greenwillow, 1987), and Ed Emberley's Go Away, Big Green Monster! (Little, Brown, 1992)." —School Library Journal

“[Battersby] creates expressive characters...and Squish's world is a delightful collage of felt trees, giant chickens (made from yellow feathers), and torn-paper landscapes.” —Publishers Weekly

Meet the Author

Katherine Battersby grew up in North Queensland, Australia. In 2010 she won the Marten Bequest Travelling Scholarship for writing. She lives in Brisbane, Australia.

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