Bravery Soup

( 2 )

Overview


Carlin the raccoon is afraid of everything. Then he meets Big Bear who tells him that there is a way to get courage. Alone, Carlin must make a perilous journey and bring back the secret ingredient for Big Bear's Bravery Soup.

Carlin, who is frightened by everything, wants to try some of Big Bear's bravery soup, but first he must travel through a dark forest to a monster's cave to retrieve an important ingredient.

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Overview


Carlin the raccoon is afraid of everything. Then he meets Big Bear who tells him that there is a way to get courage. Alone, Carlin must make a perilous journey and bring back the secret ingredient for Big Bear's Bravery Soup.

Carlin, who is frightened by everything, wants to try some of Big Bear's bravery soup, but first he must travel through a dark forest to a monster's cave to retrieve an important ingredient.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Cocca-Leffler (Thanksgiving at the Tappletons) ladles out equal portions of the sweet and the bland in this well-traveled story line of a scaredy-raccoon. Carlin, whose mask-like eyes play up his emotions, is afraid "of bumps in the night, of trying new things, of being alone. He was afraid of his own shadow!" Zack the fox tells his pal that he needs "a bit of bravery" and takes Carlin to the edge of the woods, where Big Bear stirs a large pot of Bravery Soup. The cook sends Carlin on a perilous journey to fetch a crucial ingredient, kept in a box in a cave in Skulk Mountain. The bear reassures the quivering 'coon that "You are braver than you think," and the statement echoes in the hero's mind as he ventures alone into the Forbidden Forest, crosses a raging river and enters the dark cave. The plot loses steam when it reverts to flashback ("Carlin had not been swept away," the author reassures readers when the hero's friends find his raft), taking the oomph out of the pacing. The dense text ends with a clich d message ("It is not what is inside the box that makes bravery. It is what is inside of you!"), but the acrylics, applied with thick brushstrokes, convey the suspense as well as the warm friendship between the animal friends. Ages 3-7. (Mar.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-A timid raccoon is afraid of almost everything, including his own shadow. A friend introduces him to Big Bear, "the bravest animal in all the land," who agrees to help cowardly Carlin overcome his fears. The bear is making "Bravery Soup" and needs one more ingredient, so he sends the timid creature into the Forbidden Forest to get it. The mission involves crossing a raging river, climbing to a mountaintop cave, and facing a hairy monster. Through a bit of luck and a "trick of the eye," the little raccoon successfully retrieves the parcel. When Big Bear reveals that the box is empty, Carlin discovers that he is full of courage and proud of it. Readers then understand that Bravery Soup does not make one brave, it is served only to those who have proven themselves. The colorful illustrations are rendered in acrylic and resemble finger painting. Changes in the text size add to the visual effect and aid in reading the story aloud. Children will enjoy seeing how self-sufficient and confident Carlin becomes because of his expedition.-Maryann H. Owen, Racine Public Library, WI Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Together Zak the fox and Big Bear cook up a scheme to build courage in their raccoon friend Carlin, who is afraid of the dark, new things, and being alone. If he eats some bravery soup, his gasping, shuddering, shaking days will be over, but one ingredient is missing, and he's the raccoon to get it. He must march through the woods, cross a stream, climb a mountain, and find the box in a monster's cave; therein lies the needed secret ingredient. Carlin tosses aside the aids his friends have given him for the journey as he finds he doesn't need them, doing better on his own. There are no surprises here-everyone knows what's in the box. But the well-conceived art-bold, vibrant acrylics-capture Carlin's fear and hope, his friends' complicity and concern, and finally his determination and triumph. Whether wide-eyed with fear or teeth-gritted in determination, it is the charming illustrations that make Carlin's predictable predicament serviceable and even palatable. (Picture book. 4-7)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807508718
  • Publisher: Whitman, Albert & Company
  • Publication date: 1/1/2002
  • Series: Albert Whitman Prairie Bks.
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 386,333
  • Age range: 3 - 7 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.48 (w) x 8.52 (h) x 0.15 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2008

    Wonderful for kids

    This book we originally found at our local library. After taking it out almost 10 times we decided we needed to buy it for our son. It is a great book that helps children face their fears and gives them the realization that usually there is nothing to be afraid of. This is our sons favorite book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2002

    A WORD OF ENCOURAGEMENT FOR YOUNGSTERS

    Everyone needs a little encouragement from time to time, and that's exactly what young hearts will find in this tale of Carlin, a timid racoon, who is skittish about everything - trying new things, sounds in the night, and even his own shadow. Fortunately, Carlin has a good friend, Zack, who takes the cowering creature to Big Bear, 'the bravest animal in all the land.' Big Bear tells Carlin that the soup he is preparing, Bravery Soup, will banish all fears. Problem is, one extremely important ingredient is missing and Carlin must go after it. Poor shuddering Carlin, he 'must go alone through the Forbidden Forest to Skulk Mountain,' and then into a cave in which a box is hidden. With knees shaking and lips trembling Carlin sets out. The little fellow learns many important lessons along the way, and so will all who read this reassuring tale.

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