Breach of Faith: A Crisis of Coverage in the Age of Corporate Newspapering

Overview

What has happened to the news? Over the past decade, there has been a major shift in newspaper coverage. Many newspaper executives, paring costs and badly misreading public appetites, have cut back dramatically on all types of public-affairs reporting. Fewer reporters than ever are assigned to the statehouse or the White House, to city hall or foreign capitals. Too often celebrity gossip and movie tips take the place of serious journalism instead of existing alongside it. Newspapers once operated under a mandate ...

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Overview

What has happened to the news? Over the past decade, there has been a major shift in newspaper coverage. Many newspaper executives, paring costs and badly misreading public appetites, have cut back dramatically on all types of public-affairs reporting. Fewer reporters than ever are assigned to the statehouse or the White House, to city hall or foreign capitals. Too often celebrity gossip and movie tips take the place of serious journalism instead of existing alongside it. Newspapers once operated under a mandate to provide the kinds of news that citizens need to function in a democratic society, but many corporations have changed that mandate.

For more than two years, legendary editor Gene Roberts led a group of journalists in an unprecedented study of the newspaper industry for the American Journalism Review. This is the second volume of their findings. The first, Leaving Readers Behind: The Age of Corporate Newspapering, documented the storm of buying, selling, and consolidation that is transforming the American press. This second volume explores the consequences of these changes for ordinary communities and for the nation, arguing that they place democracy itself in peril.

Contributors include Peter Arnett, Mary Walton, Charles Layton, John Herbers, James McCartney, Carl Sessions Stepp, Lewis M. Simons, Chip Brown and Winnie Hu.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Enormous changes have taken place in the newspaper industry in recent years, from the birth of USA Today to the growth of Web-based media, introducing a host of questions about these changes' impact on average American newspapers in particular and on democracy as a whole. Newspaper editor Roberts (New York Times; Philadelphia Inquirer) and a group of journalists have been studying these questions and have released their findings in a pair of volumes. The first, Leaving Readers Behind (2001), focused on the economics of these changes. This second volume focuses on these changes' impact on the content of daily papers. While these eight essays touch on a variety of concerns-declining coverage of statehouse politics even as lobbyists grab more power, increasing coverage of business and sports, and the decrease of national and international coverage-there's an underlying despair that runs throughout them. Modern newspapers are better written and better looking, but they've lost their distinctive flavor, these writers say, that "essential local ingredient" that makes readers loyal. Worse, they avoid important national and most international stories; "a foreign story that doesn't involve bombs, natural disasters, or financial calamity" rarely makes it into the news. Focus group researchers argue that this trend mirrors readers' preferences, yet many of these essays insist that to maintain an informed electorate, newspapers need to refocus on hard news and let the accountants worry about the bottom line. J-school students and media policy makers will benefit greatly from this wise collection. (Dec.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781557288080
  • Publisher: University of Arkansas Press
  • Publication date: 10/28/2005
  • Pages: 243
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.80 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Gene Roberts teaches in the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland. He has had a long, distinguished career as reporter and editor, including serving as the managin editor of the New York Times and the executive editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer. During his eighteen years at the Inquirer, the paper won seventeen Pulitzer Prizes.

Thomas Kunkel became dean of the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland after three years as editor and director of the Project on the State of the American Newspaper and a long career in the newspaper business. He is also the author of Genius in Disguise: Harold Ross of the New Yorker (Carrol & Graf, 1996).

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Contributors
Ch. 1 Missing the Story at the Statehouse 1
Ch. 2 The New Washington Merry-Go-Round 49
Ch. 3 Goodbye, World 65
Ch. 4 Then and Now 89
Ch. 5 What Do Readers Really Want? 117
Ch. 6 Follow the Money 149
Ch. 7 Fear.Com 185
Ch. 8 The Training Track 227
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