Break Your Mother's Heart

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Hal Horowitz
The follow-up to Tim Easton's well-received sophomore effort The Truth About Us strips his rootsy Americana sound down even further. The John Prine and Bob Dylan comparisons still hold, but now he adds a taste of Paul Simon's earliest work; all noticeable in his unaffected, near laconic, sand-and-honey vocals. On Break Your Mother's Heart, echoes of Dylan's "Tombstone Blues" run through "Lexington Jail," made all the more vivid when Jai Winding's Al Kooper-ish organ enters the mix. But for all its obvious connections, Easton's music remains refreshingly unique; infused with colorful lyrics that describe the struggling lives and lost loves of rural Americans in ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Hal Horowitz
The follow-up to Tim Easton's well-received sophomore effort The Truth About Us strips his rootsy Americana sound down even further. The John Prine and Bob Dylan comparisons still hold, but now he adds a taste of Paul Simon's earliest work; all noticeable in his unaffected, near laconic, sand-and-honey vocals. On Break Your Mother's Heart, echoes of Dylan's "Tombstone Blues" run through "Lexington Jail," made all the more vivid when Jai Winding's Al Kooper-ish organ enters the mix. But for all its obvious connections, Easton's music remains refreshingly unique; infused with colorful lyrics that describe the struggling lives and lost loves of rural Americans in heart-wrenching detail. Although assisted by high-profile drummer Jim Keltner along with Heartbreaker Mike Campbell and noted session guitarist Greg Leisz on one track each, Easton overdubs himself on a variety of stringed and keyboard instruments, adding to the album's already individual feel. On "The Man That You Need," the disc's longest and most intimate track, he handles all the music, imparting the sober tune with a comfy confidential connection. Between the tinkling mandolin, somber pump organ, and his high-lonesome voice, the track is a tour de force for the introspective artist. Two covers from obscure songwriter J.P. Olsen in whose backing band Easton used to play are the album's only non-original tunes. The overall sound is spacious and meticulous but far from slick, with Easton's earthy voice hovering above the proceedings like a storm cloud over a picnic. By retreating from the all-star Wilco lineup of his last album, Easton has created a more personal and affecting work. It's sure to connect with his established audience, as well as win him new fans.
Rolling Stone - Tom Moon
[Easton's songs] are doubly blessed -- with memorable musical nuances and a novelist's sense of humanity.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 2/11/2003
  • Label: New West Records
  • UPC: 607396604326
  • Catalog Number: 6043
  • Sales rank: 295,688

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Poor, Poor La (3:49)
  2. 2 Black Hearted Ways (3:13)
  3. 3 John Gilmartin (3:17)
  4. 4 Hanging Tree (5:09)
  5. 5 Lexington Jail (3:13)
  6. 6 Hummingbird (4:23)
  7. 7 Amor Azul (3:20)
  8. 8 Watching the Lightning (6:48)
  9. 9 Man That You Need (5:11)
  10. 10 True Ways (2:25)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Tim Easton Primary Artist, Acoustic Guitar, Guitar, Harmonica, Mandolin, Percussion, Piano, Electric Guitar, Maracas, Hammond Organ, Tambourine, Vocals, 12-string Guitar, Pump Organ
Jim Keltner Drums
Ted Easton Guitar (Tremolo)
James "Hutch" Hutchinson Bass
Greg Leisz Dobro
Jai Winding Piano, Hammond Organ
Dave Philips Electric Guitar
Chris Burney Upright Bass
Jilann O'Neill Vocals
Dawn Hill Voices
Technical Credits
Leon Russell Composer
John Hanlon Producer, Engineer
Doug Sax Mastering
Don Smith Engineer
Tim Easton Producer
Robert Hadley Mastering
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Easton's Best Yet

    It might be the connection with Columbus, OH, and the fact that I've seen him quite a few times, but on my first listening of Tim Easton's new album, I think I can say this might be his best yet. This album stands solid as a unique work that I don't think can really be compared to Dylan (as everyone else seems to do). Lexington Jail has always been a favorite of mine, and this treatment is one of the best. Just a fabulous album, and hopefully others will finally see what his fans have seen for such a long time, a brilliant songwriter and performer. Thanks Tim.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews