The Breakdown Lane [NOOK Book]

Overview

Where can a woman turn when her own life threatens to overwhelm her ability to keep her children safe? New York Times bestselling author Jacquelyn Mitchard takes the readers of her newest novel on a wry and moving journey of loss and healing.

Giving advice is what Julieanne does for a living -- every Sunday she doles it out to clueless people she doesn't know, in a column in her local Wisconsin paper. But when it comes to her personal life, Julie herself seems to have missed ...

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The Breakdown Lane

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Overview

Where can a woman turn when her own life threatens to overwhelm her ability to keep her children safe? New York Times bestselling author Jacquelyn Mitchard takes the readers of her newest novel on a wry and moving journey of loss and healing.

Giving advice is what Julieanne does for a living -- every Sunday she doles it out to clueless people she doesn't know, in a column in her local Wisconsin paper. But when it comes to her personal life, Julie herself seems to have missed some clues. Having worked creatively to keep her twenty-year marriage to Leo fresh and exciting, she is completely caught off guard when he tells her he needs to go on a "sabbatical" from their life together, leaving Julie and their three children -- Gabe, Caroline, and Aury -- behind. But it soon becomes clear that his leave of absence is meant to be permanent. The succeeding months are filled with a confusion and sadness that shake the core of the entire family. Things take a turn for the worse when Julie is diagnosed with a serious illness and the children undertake a dangerous journey to find Leo -- before it's too late. As the known world sinksprecariously from view, the clan must navigate its way through the shoals of love, guilt, and betrayal. Together, with the help of Leo's parents and Julie's best friend, Cathy, they work their way back to solid ground and a new definition of family.

No one illuminates modern love, marriage, and parenting better than Jacquelyn Mitchard. Written with her trademark poignancy, humor, and insight, The Breakdown Lane is her most moving, eloquent,and life-affirming work yet.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Julianne Gillis Steiner, mother, and advice columnist, is well aware of the challenges in keeping a marriage fresh. Faced with the usual domestic day-to-day events, she becomes suspicious when Leo, her husband of 20 years, seeks a "sabbatical" from their married life, leaving the family for six months and promising daily phone calls. Shortly after Leo's departure, Julianne is diagnosed with a serious illness. Although this novel could have easily become a maudlin disease-of-the-month book, Mitchard (The Deep End of the Ocean) handles the various themes of abandonment, illness, and family disappointment with finesse. Chapters begin with Julianne's advice column; son Gabriel, angry and bitter, writes the alternating chapters as journal entries. Learning-disabled Gabriel, the most skillfully drawn character, is the heart and soul of this story, indicating that Michard certainly has an empathy for teens. Despite the family's trials, this is an optimistic novel and is recommended for most popular collections.
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
“[Mitchard] takes emotional family events and makes something fresh yet familiar about them...”
BookPage
“...An intriguing study of a quintessential American family...[a] thought-provoking, introspective novel.”
Life magazine
“Mitchard dissects feelings of loyalty, betrayal and guilt with such aplomb, the book moves along like a thriller.”
Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel
“THE BREAKDOWN LANE takes the reader on a journey of love and loss, self-discovery and synergy, a satisfying story.
Associated Press
“[Mitchard’s] tale of an imploding American family will rule the beaches this summer.”
Washington Post
“From our petulant, prideful heroine to her sullen-yet-saintly son, each character’s complexities shine...”
Capital Times
“Mitchard’s work...is filled with vivid characters who live out loud, and in vibrant color.”
Associated Press Staff
“[Mitchard’s] tale of an imploding American family will rule the beaches this summer.”
No Source
“I dare you to read Breakdown Lane and not adore its quirky, all-too-human cast of characters. With her ear for language and artist’s eye for detail, Jackie Mitchard will take you on a journey through loss, hope, and every kind of love there is.”
Life Magazine
"Mitchard dissects feelings of loyalty, betrayal and guilt with such aplomb, the book moves along like a thriller."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061842092
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/13/2009
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 165,397
  • File size: 815 KB

Meet the Author

Jacquelyn Mitchard

New York Times bestseller Jacquelyn Mitchard's novels include The Deep End of the Ocean, Twelve Times Blessed, and The Breakdown Lane. She is also the author of The Rest of Us: Dispatches from the Mother Ship, a collection of her newspaper columns. She lives with her husband and six children in Madison, Wisconsin.

Biography

"Jacquelyn Mitchard has considered changing her name legally to The Deep End of the Ocean. This is because her own name is much less well-known than the title of her first book," so read the opening lines of Mitchard's biography on her web site. Granted, the writer is best known for the novel that holds the distinct honor of being the very first pick in Oprah Winfrey's book club, but Mitchard is also responsible for a number of other bestsellers, all baring her distinctive ability to tackle emotional subject matter without lapsing into cloying sentimentality.

Mitchard got her start as a newspaper journalist in the ‘70s, but first established herself as a writer to watch in 1985 when she published Mother Less Child, a gut wrenching account of her own miscarriage. Though autobiographical in nature, Mother Less Child introduced the themes of grief and coping that would often resurface in her fiction. These themes were particularly prevalent in the debut novel that would nab Mitchard her greatest notoriety. The Deep End of the Ocean tells of the depression that grips a woman and her son following the disappearance of her younger son. Like Mother Less Child, the novel was also based on a personal tragedy, the death of her husband, and the author's very real grief contributes to the emotional authenticity of the book.

The Deep End of the Ocean became a commercial and critical smash, lauded by every publication from People Magazine to Newsweek. It exemplified Mitchard's unique approach to her subject. In lesser hands, such a story might have sunk into precious self-reflection. However Mitchard approaches her story as equal parts psychological drama and suspenseful thriller. "I like to read stories in which things happen," she told Book Reporter. "I get very impatient with books that are meditations - often beautiful ones - on a single character's thoughts and reactions. I like a story that roller coasters from one event to the next, peaks and valleys."

The Deep End of the Ocean undoubtedly changed Mitchard's life. She was still working part time at the University of Wisconsin-Madison writing speeches when the novel got Oprah's seal of approval and went into production as a major motion picture starring Michelle Pfeiffer. She didn't even consider leaving her job until, as she recounted to Book Slut.com, "my boss finally said to me, ‘You know, kiddo, people whose books have sold this many copies and are being made into movies don't have this part-time job.'" So, she left her job despite misgivings and embarked upon a writing career that would produce such powerful works as The Most Wanted, Twelve Times Blessed, and The Breakdown Lane. She has also written two non-fictional volumes about peace activist Jane Addams.

Mitchard's latest Cage of Stars tells of Veronica Swan, a twelve-year old girl living in a Mormon community whose life is completely upturned when her sisters are murdered. Again, a story of this nature could have easily played out as a banal tear jerker, but Mitchard allows Veronica to take a more active role in the novel, setting out to avenge the death of her sisters. Consequently, Case of Stars is another example of Mitchard's ability to turn the tables on convention and produce a story with both emotional resonance and a page-turning narrative, making for a novel created with the express purpose of pleasing her fans. "Narrative is not in fashion in the novels of our current era; reflection is," she told Book Reporter. "But buying a book and reading it is a substantial investment of time and money. I want to take readers on a journey full circle. They deserve it."

Good To Know

Mitchard is certainly most famous for her sophisticated adult novels, yet she has also written two children's novels, Rosalie and Starring Prima, as well as Baby Bat's Lullaby, a picture book. She currently has three new children's books in development.

Now that Mitchard has officially scored a successful writing career, what could be left for the writer to achieve? Well, according to her web site, her "truest ambition" is to make an appearance on the popular TV show Law and Order.

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First Chapter

The Breakdown Lane LP

Chapter One

Genesis

Excess Baggage
by J. A. Gillis
The Sheboygan News-Clarion

Dear J.,

I'm getting married next summer, to a man of another nationality. Both families are very happy, but there is a problem. His many female relatives -- aunts, grandmothers, and sisters -- must sit in the front row, as is their right. As descendants of the Masai in Africa, they are very tall. My family is Japanese-American. We are small -- in number and in size. My father is only five feet four, my sisters less than five feet. The wedding will take place in a hotel ballroom with chairs set up in rows. We did not want to have a "bride's" side and a "groom's" side, because we want this to be a true blending of families. However, I know that the women in my fiancé's family are going to wear large, decorative hats (I don't mean ceremonial headdresses, as these are African AMERICANS of many generations, but what my fiancé refers to as "church-lady" hats, which are the size of our wedding cake). This will make them even taller, and so no one except my mother and father will be able to see me during the ceremony. I don't want to suggest that they "move to the back of the bus" for my family. So how can we avoid slighting anyone on our special day? Given the disparity of heights, the wedding dance will also be very awkward.

Nervous in Knudson

Dear Nervous,

This is a matter of some sensitivity, since tensions on a wedding day can leave a bitter taste that can linger for years. But nerves? You've already probably got the once-in-a-lifetime jitters every bride endures. Don't add this small opportunity for creativity to your checklist of stress. With the same joy of life you've already demonstrated by your beautifully bold choice to mingle cultures, craft a circle of joy. Ask the staff at the hotel to place the wedding chairs in a wide circle with the first row reserved for the principal members of both families and the rest of the chairs in staggered rows behind, so that each person, regardless of heights, will enjoy a wonderful view. Guests will be escorted through a small opening, the same place your groom will enter with his parents, a few moments before you enter with yours. Make the altar or other ceremonial platform in the center "a round," also -- perhaps exchanging your vows facing in one direction, conducting the ceremonies of rings or candles facing the other, with the transitions gracefully made to instrumental music or song. As for the dance! No one feels awkward at such a happy affair! Think of all the aunts and grandmas you've seen dancing the polka in groups of five!

J.

Let's begin at the end of the beginning. The first moment of the second act of our lives.

It was ballet class. It was the second class of the week, made up of dance combinations and mat Pilates. Steady on the studio floor, I was ready to begin my final stretches. I remember that, a wonderful feeling. I was spent, but pleasurably, my hips not so much aching as aware they'd been asked for something strenuous. This class, and my weight training were the times during my week I felt freed from strain, just shy of pure.

I extended my right leg along the floor in its customary turnout -- posturally correct, erect on my sitz bones, a little bit smug, but trying not to glance around me to observe that other women, even younger women, noticed the way my flexibility still came easily -- and leaned forward for the hamstring stretch.

What I saw when I looked down horrified me so much that my mind scrabbled away from me, across the birchy floor.

What was it?

Numb shard of bone? Foot clawed birdlike, in spasm?

Worse. It was ... nothing.

Nothing was different than what I'd seen when I sat down five seconds earlier. It was only my leg, my ordinary leg in the unsoiled glove of my unitard (the silver one my youngest daughter used to call my "mermaid clothes") still bent in a forty-five-degree angle at the knee, my pointed toe nestled against my thigh.

Doesn't sound like much, does it?

You have a right to expect more of terrors. Sharp, single shriek on a silent street. Pea-sized lump your finger grazes as you soap your breast. Tang of smoke in the still air, footsteps' rhythm matching your own, in the dusk of an empty parking lot. A shadow that jumps against a wall in a room in which you know you are alone.

But think! A thing so huge it will dismember your world can be invisible. It can be a germ. A scent. It can be an absence.

You see, I had felt my leg open smoothly, like a knife with a well-balanced mechanism. But it had not.

A cascade of thoughts, like the fountain from a child's sparkler, showered over me: the phantom limb phenomenon, the precursor to a stroke, a paralysis caused by some virus. My first instinct was to scream. Instead, like any sane person, I tried again.

My leg refused.

Metallic, icy sweat burst from my pores, bathing my face and neck, painting gleaming half-moons under my breasts. I dampened like a true mermaid in my "mermaid's clothes." From the corner of my eye, I glanced at my friend, Cathy, who took the class with me, as her arms branched and she arched down over her own leg. Her eyes, closed in concentration, suddenly flipped up, like one of those old venetian blinds, as if she'd heard a crack, a clap, as if I truly had screamed. She looked at me, quizzically, one eyebrow a beckoning finger. I grinned ...

The Breakdown Lane LP. Copyright © by Jacquelyn Mitchard. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Reading Group Guide

Introduction

Giving advice is what Julianne Ambrose Gillis does for a living: Every Sunday she doles it out to "clueless" people she doesn't know, in a column in her local Wisconsin paper. But when it comes to her personal life, Julie seems to have missed some clues. She has worked hard to keep her marriage fresh and to be a good mother, so it's a mystery when Leo, her husband of twenty years, decides to defect from their life together and their three children, Gabe, Caroline, and Aury.

In his absence, Julie is diagnosed with a serious illness, which drives her children to undertake a dangerous journey to find Leo -- before it's too late. As the known world sinks precariously from view and leaves them all adrift, the members of the Gillis clan must navigate their way through the trenches of love, guilt, and betrayal back to solid ground and a new definition of family.

Questions for Discussion

  1. What kinds of columns does Julianne Gillis write for the Sheboygan News-Clarion? How does she get her job in the first place, and what does it eventually lead to? Why does the tone of her columns change over the course of The Breakdown Lane?

  2. Describe Julie and Leo's marriage: what connects them as a couple, and what distances them from each other? What do you think explains Leo's disappearance?

  3. What aspects of the family life described in The Breakdown Lane resonated with your own experiences? Did Jacquelyn Mitchard capture marriage, parenting, separation, pregnancy, divorce, remarriage, or adoption in a way that reminded you of some of these phases in your life?

  4. What unconventional help do Julie's family and friends offer her and her family during Leo's absence? What drastic and difficult economic measures must Julie make to keep her family afloat? What did you think of these compromises?

  5. What are some of the physical symptoms Julianne experiences prior to being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis? What are some of the emotional changes she undergoes as she begins the medical course of treatment for her disease?

  6. How do Gabe, Caroline, and Aurora interact with each other as siblings? What do you think explains their different reactions to their mother's illness and their parents' separation?

  7. How does Gabe's learning disability color his perspective on life? Why does he decide to drop out of high school? How does his friendship with Tian change him?

  8. Describe the "hippie lifestyle" that Leo seeks. When Gabe and Caroline go looking for Leo, what do they encounter? How does what they find affect them and their relationships with their father?

  9. Who is Matthew MacDougall and how does Julie reconnect with him? What kind of life does her promise her and her children, and how does he fulfill that promise?

  10. What did you think of the end of The Breakdown Lane? How did you feel on learning that Julianne Gillis was a pseudonym?

About the Author

Jacquelyn Mitchard is the New York Times bestselling author of Twelve Times Blessed, A Theory of Relativity, The Deep End of the Ocean, The Most Wanted, and The Rest of Us, a collection of her columns that are nationally syndicated by Tribune Media. She lives in Madison, Wisconsin, with her husband and six children.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2005

    Deadbeat Dad of Worst Kind

    Although Julieanne offers helpful advice via a weekly column in a local newspaper, she was oblivious to the warning signs that her own twenty-year marriage was about to collapse. When her husband, Leo announces that the pressure of domesticity is weighing him down and needs a six month 'time-out' Julieanne pleads with him to reconsider. He doesn't. He takes off, with the empty promise of returning in six monts, to a commune far away from home. He doesn't even leave a forwarding address. With the recently acquired status of single parent and breadwinner of three (two teens and a toddler) Julieanne is stressed beyond belief. That stress is followed by puzzling medical symptoms that are soon diagnosed as MS. The reader goes along on the journey with this family guided by the voice of Julieanne and her mildly disabled teen son, Gabe. Gabe's voice will touch any mother's heart. He's been victimized by his peers due to his LD but the reader quickly learns that Gabe possesses depth and sensitivity and intelligence that would make any mother proud. When his mother becomes too ill to properly care for baby Aury, Gabe steps up to the plate without complaining. We don't get Julieanne's daughter Caroline's perspective through her own voice, but we're made aware that Caroline seems too self-absorbed to be affected by the unraveling of her family. Later, we learn that Caroline was simply using the only coping skills she could access during the most troubling and confusing time of her life. Caroline concocts a plan for damage control: go to the commune and fetch the father who deserted them. Surely once he finds gets a first hand account of the terrible troubles at home, he'll come running back, shame-faced and begging for forgiveness. Dad, however, is none too happy to see his two offspring. He's already started another family with a younger woman. Amazingly, this family bonds together and with the help of a family friend and new rich husband for Julieanne, there's a happily ever after for everyone. Even baby Aury. A touching read, which Mitchard tied up nicely at the end.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2013

    Die and Dark

    You see violet and black everywhere almost missing the two identical cats...the only differance was one was weak and under the strong one...help...grab....AHH dark screamed...YOU SHALL DIE DARK HELP ME KILL HER......this is your time to pick....grab dark and glitch out possibly killing die...my choice...or kill dark and only die will remain

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2012

    Highly Recommended!!!

    Page turner. I could not put down the book. I read this book in 2 days.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2011

    Great read

    Page turner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2011

    Very interesting book.

    A very heart warming book, filled with ups and downs in the family life of writer that ends up with MS. Learning to live again after things fall apart, but never giving up and a happy ending. I lovedthe two perspectives, Jules and Gabes in the journals that they kept. What a family endures and goes thru, capitvated me and kept me engrossed. It was so real like to me as if I was reading in secret or watching from the outside looking in.

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  • Posted October 26, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Jennifer Wardrip - Personal Read

    I actually picked up this book on the recommendation of--don't laugh!--Stephen King. As one of the ten books he recommended for late summer reads in an issue of Entertainment Weekly Magazine, the premise hooked me. <BR/><BR/>The book centers around a woman who not only loses her husband to a wacky desire to live a simpler and more-fulfilling life, but has to single-handedly raise two teenagers and a young daughter by herself, all while dealing with her diagnosis of MS. <BR/><BR/>THE BREAKDOWN LANE is women's fiction at its best. I actually enjoyed the two first-person accounts that make up the book (it's in the form of a journal belonging to the mother and one written by the son). Although it does end up with a rather happily-ever-after ending, this book details life in all its ups and downs--and you'll appreciate being along for the ride.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2007

    Pass on this one-

    The storyline is slow and sad..... if you are an active attentive dad you will hate this book - the father is complete loser / deadbeat scum and the wife/mother is an enabler of the first order - neither of whom have the childrens best interests in mind or heart - wraps up neatly and quickly and for once I was grateful for this type of ending - it was the best part.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2007

    Wonderful Women's Fiction

    I actually picked up this book on the recommendation of--don't laugh!--Stephen King. As one of the ten books he recommended for late summer reads in an issue of Entertainment Weekly Magazine, the premise hooked me. The book centers around a woman who not only loses her husband to a wacky desire to live a simpler and more-fulfilling life, but has to single-handedly raise two teenagers and a young daughter by herself, all while dealing with her diagnosis of MS. THE BREAKDOWN LANE is women's fiction at its best. I actually enjoyed the two first-person accounts that make up the book (it's in the form of a journal belonging to the mother and one written by the son). Although it does end up with a rather happily-ever-after ending, this book details life in all its ups and downs--and you'll appreciate being along for the ride.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2005

    good understanding on MS

    I was interested in reading this book after hearing from fellow readers that the main character deals with MS. I am a person with MS and I found that she protrayed the MS in a positive way. A person with MS does not do well with stress of any kind. I felt as if she had used parts of my life as research for this book. Many people with MS are diagnosed shortly after something very stressful has happened in their life. I can only hope that this book will help people better understand the illness. One moment you can be fine and the next unable to think correctly, walk, sight can be affected as well as speech. Thank You for this information.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2005

    A Superb Read!!!

    I simply couldn't put this book down. I could identify with nearly every character in this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2005

    A BIG disappointment

    After reading the back of the book I thought I would be amazing. Lackluster to say the least. I wasn't thrilled to say the least. Actually managed to finish it though and then I gave it to a friend may be they can appericate it cause I can't

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2005

    COULDN'T PUT IT DOWN

    I loved this book and couldn't put it down. This is one of Jacquelyn Mitchard's best books yet. It keeps you on your toes wondering what's going to happen next with this woman's life and her family. What a strong woman.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2005

    AN AFFECTING DRAMA ELOQUENTLY READ

    Few authors plumb the depths of human emotion as deftly as Jackie Mitchard (Was there a dry eye at the conclusion 'The Deep End of the Ocean'?) Once again she explores the nooks and crannies of love, family and human relationships in the story of Julieanne Gillis. Actress Anna Fields does a superb job of occupying two narrative voices, that of Julieanne and her learning disabled teenage son, Gabe. As Julieanne, she is torn, angry, brave and resilient. With Gabe she gives voice to a young man who is forced to learn very early what can happen when a marriage not only bends but breaks. Married for 20 years to Leo, a not terribly successful lawyer, Julieanne has given birth to three children, two now in their early teens, the third just out of babyhood. She dispenses advice through a column in the local newspaper in their Wisconsin town. She's happy, devoted to her children, and her friends. Sorry the same can't be said for Leo. Think selfish, inconsiderate, or to put it more bluntly 'a real loser' and you have a pretty good picture of him. Seems he's decided he wants to take a break from hearth and home to live in a commune. Off he goes leaving Julieanne and the children behind. He doesn't even leave a forwarding address. When Julieanne is diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, she has no idea how she can continue being a single parent. Gabe, a son any mother would love, and his sister take off in search of their errant father. 'The Breakdown Lane' is both riveting drama and eloquent reminder of the mysteries of love. - Gail Cooke

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2005

    Not as good as I hoped

    I've red most of her other books and loved them. As someone with MS, I was very keen to read this one, but found it disappointing. Some aspects were poorly researched (particularly the treatments used), which let down the bits that were on the mark for MS. I found myself more attracted by interplay of the other characters, especially the children, than the main character. She came across as more flat and one dimensional, defined pretty much by her disease. The development of the other characters was more interesting to me.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2005

    Forget your housework!!! Captivating, Great Novel!

    Plan on skipping meals and staying up late!!!! Jacqueline Mitchard has created a BLOCKBUSTER story, about a family of lost souls. Julieanne Gillis, a sweet Wisconsin housewife with a too-comfortable marriage and three kids, makes a meager living writing an advice column for a local paper. Blinded by the great advice she gives so freely to others, she fails to see the daily boredom that oozes from her own husband's pores. Once a ravishing dancer, she suddenly finds herself ravaged by a crumbling marriage and a tsunami of disease; Multiple Sclerosis. Her oldest children must leave Wisconsin to find their deadbeat dad, only to find themselves in the process. This riveting novel has many detours and 'breakdown lanes,' and like real life, runs the gamut of emotions. GREAT, GREAT READ!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2005

    Jacquelyn Mitchard At Her Best

    This book was so engaging, I did not want to put it down. The story is of ordinary people facing major challenges, except in 'The Breakdown Lane' all of them hit at once. Julianne is a successful advice columnist; she has a home and a family and a life that seems to be going smoothly along on cruise control. But she suddenly has the rug pulled out from under her and she finds herself without a husband, raising 3 children alone, and being diagnosed with a devastating illness that will literally knock her flat. Although difficult, none of these challenges are insurmountable by themselves. But Julianne has everything dropped upon her at once, and when the dust clears, she is alone and the horizon looks very dark. This book is not depressing; it is funny and poignant, sad and uplifting.I attribute this all to Ms. Mitchard's ability to craft a story that is realistic and believable. Her characters' voices are real. Her writing is right on the mark with dialogue, and her insight into Julianne's feelings is touching and true. I found myself wanting to shake her cad of a husband, and hug her son Gabe when he reaches down inside himself to help her. This novel is like a jigsaw puzzle that was finished, and then knocked off the card table. It gets put back together, but some of the pieces are missing. The puzzle is the same, the picture just looks a little different. This is an excellent book. I enjoyed reading it and know it will make a great selection for my book discussion group. I highly recommend it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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    Posted August 18, 2009

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