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Breaking Rank: A Top Cop's Exposé of the Dark Side of American Policing
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Breaking Rank: A Top Cop's Exposé of the Dark Side of American Policing

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by Norm Stamper
 

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Opening with a powerful letter to former Tacoma police chief David Brame, who shot his estranged wife before turning the gun on himself, Norm Stamper introduces us to the violent, secret world of domestic abuse that cops must not only navigate, but which some also perpetrate. Former chief of the Seattle police force, Stamper goes on to expose a troubling culture

Overview


Opening with a powerful letter to former Tacoma police chief David Brame, who shot his estranged wife before turning the gun on himself, Norm Stamper introduces us to the violent, secret world of domestic abuse that cops must not only navigate, but which some also perpetrate. Former chief of the Seattle police force, Stamper goes on to expose a troubling culture of racism, sexism, and homophobia that is still pervasive within the twenty-first-century force; then he explores how such prejudices can be addressed. He reveals the dangers and temptations that cops face, describing in gripping detail the split-second life-and-death decisions. Stamper draws on lessons learned to make powerful arguments for drug decriminalization, abolition of the death penalty, and radically revised approaches to prostitution and gun control. He offers penetrating insights into the "blue wall of silence," police undercover work, and what it means to kill a man. And, Stamper gives his personal account of the World Trade organization debacle of 1999, when protests he was in charge of controlling turned violent in the streets of Seattle. Breaking Rank reveals Norm Stamper as a brave man, a pioneering public servant whose extraordinary life has been dedicated to the service of his community.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
The best police stories are told by police officers. In Breaking Rank, Stamper, a 34-year police veteran (he's the former chief of police in Seattle and former deputy chief in San Diego) candidly describes his odyssey as a police officer and offers equally candid advice along the way. Born near San Diego, Stamper was abused by his parents and as a teenager had numerous run-ins with the police. He decided to join the police force because he needed the money. While accounts of daily police work comprise the bulk of Breaking Rank, Stamper also offers a number of clear-cut ideas on how best to reduce crime. For example, he argues for the decriminalization of recreational drugs, the legalization of prostitution, and the abolishment of the death penalty and provides compelling evidence to support his theories. This lengthy, well-written work is recommended for collections in criminal justice and police studies.-Tim Delaney, SUNY at Oswego Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781560258551
Publisher:
Nation Books
Publication date:
07/28/2006
Pages:
416
Sales rank:
138,506
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
13 - 18 Years

Meet the Author


Norm Stamper began his law enforcement career in San Diego in 1966 as a beat cop. In 1994, he was named chief of the Seattle Police Department, where he set about implementing many of the initiatives he writes about in Breaking Rank. Retiring in 2000, he now lives in a cabin on a mountain in the San Juan Islands in Washington State.

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Breaking Rank: A Top Cop's Exposé of the Dark Side of American Policing 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had high hopes when getting this book. It's long been known that police departments across the country do need reform to varying degrees. However, Breaking Rank, came across as nothing more then a rant that wasn't backed up with much substance. I felt points were not well made. Stamper didn't make a good case for many of his views. There simply wasn't the facts, or research, or case, for why he supported or didn't a particular process or belief etc. Frankly, I don't think he writes well. It's unfortunate as I do think if he could articulate well what his experiences have taught him, he would have an interesting story to tell. If he was a better writer, he would have had a better chance at effective change. Consequently, he did nothing for the area of reform which is needed in many police department policies. He may have in fact harmed things to a worse degree by not effectively making his case.