Breaking the Conflict Trap: Civil War and Development Policy

Overview

Civil war conflict is a core development issue. The existence of civil war can dramatically slow a country's development process, especially in low-income countries which are more vulnerable to civil war conflict. Conversely, development can impede civil war. When development succeeds, countries become safer-when development fails, they experience a greater risk of being caught in a conflict trap. Ultimately, civil war is a failure of development.

'Breaking the Conflict Trap' identifies the dire consequences that...

See more details below
Paperback (New Edition)
$27.17
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$29.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (8) from $21.84   
  • New (7) from $21.84   
  • Used (1) from $27.21   
Sending request ...

Overview

Civil war conflict is a core development issue. The existence of civil war can dramatically slow a country's development process, especially in low-income countries which are more vulnerable to civil war conflict. Conversely, development can impede civil war. When development succeeds, countries become safer-when development fails, they experience a greater risk of being caught in a conflict trap. Ultimately, civil war is a failure of development.

'Breaking the Conflict Trap' identifies the dire consequences that civil war has on the development process and offers three main findings. First, civil war has adverse ripple effects that are often not taken into account by those who determine whether wars start or end. Second, some countries are more likely than others to experience civil war conflict and thus, the risks of civil war differ considerably according to a country's characteristics including its economic stability. Finally, Breaking the Conflict Trap explores viable international measures that can be taken to reduce the global incidence of civil war and proposes a practical agenda for action.

This book should serve as a wake up call to anyone in the international community who still thinks that development and conflict are distinct issues.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"The book's findings are instructive.... The authors wisely advise that no single policy can be successful on its own and each country or conflict needs a unique combination of initiatives which address the specific conditions."--Public Administration and Development

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780821354810
  • Publisher: World Bank Publications
  • Publication date: 5/30/2003
  • Series: Policy Research Reports
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 1,432,111
  • Product dimensions: 6.78 (w) x 9.26 (h) x 0.47 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword
The Report Team
Acronyms and Abbreviations
Overview 1
Pt. I Cry Havoc: Why Civil War Matters 11
1 Civil War as Development in Reverse 13
2 Let Them Fight It Out among Themselves? 33
Pt. II What Fuels Civil War? 51
3 What Makes a Country Prone to Civil War? 53
4 Why Is Civil War So Common? 93
Pt. III Policies for Peace 119
5 What Works Where? 121
6 An Agenda for International Action 173
App. 1 Methods and Data 189
App. 2 A Selected Bibliography of Studies of Civil War and Rebellion 197
References 211
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    As broad as Paul Collier's research might involve, his work products are always educative. He has identied key areas that development policies can undertake. Practitioners suggest that the combination of Western and local practices yield success.

    I had the opportunity to read part of Paul Collier's work in one of my classes this semester: The Bottom Billion. He is quoted by The Philanthropy News Digest:
    "The problem of the bottom billion is serious, but...fixable. Change is going to have to come from within the societies of the bottom billion, but our own policies could make these efforts more likely to succeed, and so more likely to be undertaken. We will need a range of policy instruments to encourage the countries of the bottom billion to take steps toward change. To date we have used these instruments badly, so there is considerable scope for improvement."
    My perspective, and I would argue the same in the case of Jeffery Sachs' book on poverty, is that both authors focus their work much on quantitative (I would like to see the data) than qualitative aspects of development disregarding the binary nature of things as put forward by postmodern thinkers.
    As a companion piece to the Bottom Billion, the War, Guns and Votes summarizes the former book while presenting a new and compelling story line. But where the Bottom Billion offers a broad view and sharp analysis of the causes of and remedies for endemic poverty, the new book focuses on conflict and suggested remedies. For example, the case of Ivory Coast that is now in a stalemate situation.
    According to Collier, conflict is one of the four traps that keep countries in poverty. Other factors include: a dependence on the extraction and export of natural resources; limited trade opportunities caused by landlocked geography and uncooperative neighbors; and bad governance.
    The author points out that the conventional ways the above traps have been addressed are through:
    1. Foreign aid
    2. Foreign military intervention in pursuit of greater internal security
    3. Democracy promotion and the application of international laws
    4. Foreign investment and greater budget transparency
    5. Open-trade policies
    However, Collier argues, none of these approaches is working.
    Of the solutions Collier suggests to breaking the four poverty traps, for example, de-linking foreign aid from foreign policy, I would strongly integrate other elements such as political or leadership vision, accountability, institutional building, and enforcement of laws.
    Collier's views that smaller nations are more vulnerable to conflict because they cannot achieve economies of scale in security available to larger countries bring to mind questions about countries such as Botswana and Sudan, which are small and large countries respectively. However, I agree with his long haul of building the economy of conflict nations following elections by incorporating multilateral groups such as the UN.
    Another point to observe is the role of external forces such as regional body (e.g., AU) and the UN in sharing sovereignty with post-conflict governments-organizational policies need to be modified and adaptable to host countries in state building process.
    Points of interest to me
    1. Differences between wars and conflicts
    2. I think there was a peaceful Garden of Eden (pg.4). Mankind has perpetuated war using his/her given agency
    3. Don't big countries still fight wars (cold or soft wars)?
    4. Is it denial or 'blind eyes 'to reality?
    5. According to Collier, wars will continue.in agreement with Jeremy Black's book: Wars since the 1990s
    6. Could the bottom billion have been better off if left as they were? (pg 8)
    7. Nations and states are built out of in

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)