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Breaking the Heartland: The Civil War in Georgia
     

Breaking the Heartland: The Civil War in Georgia

by John D. Fowler, David B. Parker (Editor)
 
The Civil War was arguably the watershed event in the history of the united States, forever changing the nature of the Republic and the relationship of individuals to their government. The war ended slavery and initiated the long road toward racial equality. The united States now stands at the sesquicentennial of that event, and its citizens attempt to arrive at an

Overview

The Civil War was arguably the watershed event in the history of the united States, forever changing the nature of the Republic and the relationship of individuals to their government. The war ended slavery and initiated the long road toward racial equality. The united States now stands at the sesquicentennial of that event, and its citizens attempt to arrive at an understanding of what that event meant to the past, present, and future of the nation. Few states had a greater impact on the outcome of the nation's greatest calamity than Georgia. Georgia provided 125,000 soldiers for the Confederacy as well as thousands more for the union cause. Many of the Confederacy's most influential military and civilian leaders hailed from the state. Georgia was vital to the Confederate war effort because of its agricultural and industrial output; the Confederacy had little hope of winning without the farms and shops of the state. Moreover, the state was critical to the Southern infrastructure because of the river and rail links that crossed it and connected the Western Confederacy to the eastern half. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, the war was arguably decided in North Georgia with the Atlanta Campaign and lincoln's subsequent reelection. This campaign was the last forlorn hope for the Southern Republic and the union's greatest triumph. Despite the state's importance to the Confederacy and the war's ultimate outcome, not enough has been written concerning Georgia's experience during those turbulent years. The essays in this volume attempt to redress this dearth of scholarship. They present a mosaic of events, places, and people, exploring the impact of the war on Georgia and its residents and demonstrating the importance of the state to the outcome of the Civil War.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780881462401
Publisher:
Mercer University Press
Publication date:
04/01/2011
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
835,877
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.10(d)

Meet the Author

John D. Fowler is the B. J. and Dicksie Bandy Chair of History at Dalton State College. He is the author several books and articles including Mountaineers in Gray: The Story of the Nineteenth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Regiment, C.S.A. (2004) and The Confederate Experience (2007).

David B. Parker, professor of History at Kennesaw State University, has been the department's assistant chair since August 2009. He teaches classes in Georgia history, the history of American religion, the Gilded Age, and research methods.

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