Breaking the Mishap Chain: Human Factors Lessons Learned from Aerospace Accidents and Incidents in Research, Flight Test, and Development

Breaking the Mishap Chain: Human Factors Lessons Learned from Aerospace Accidents and Incidents in Research, Flight Test, and Development

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by Peter W. Merlin
     
 

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NASA Aeronautics Book Series. By Peter W. Merlin, et al. Contains a collection of case studies of mishaps involving experimental aircraft, aerospace vehicles, and spacecraft in which human factors played a significant role. Offered as a learning tool so that future organizations, programs, and projects may not be destined to repeat the mistakes of the past. Written in

Overview

NASA Aeronautics Book Series. By Peter W. Merlin, et al. Contains a collection of case studies of mishaps involving experimental aircraft, aerospace vehicles, and spacecraft in which human factors played a significant role. Offered as a learning tool so that future organizations, programs, and projects may not be destined to repeat the mistakes of the past. Written in such a way as to be useful to a wide audience. Each case study includes a detailed analysis of aeromedical and organizational factors for the benefit of students, teachers, and others with an academic interest in human factors issues in the aerospace environment. Each story includes historical background.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781780398495
Publisher:
Books Express Publishing
Publication date:
05/23/2012
Pages:
244
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.51(d)

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Breaking the Mishap Chain: Human Factors Lessons Learned From Aerospace Accidents and Incidents in Research, Flight Test, and Development 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an extremely good piece of work detailing some well known (Six Million Dollar Man crash), and a few nearly unknown mishaps each with key lessons learned. This book is quite interesting in that it combines the history, aeromedical, human factors, and organizational structures in the 9 cited cases where they are applicable. A "must read" for pilots, applied psychologists, accident investigators, systems and flight test engineers in aviation/space, and preventive/aerospace medical persons.