Brecht On Film

Overview

This volume gathers together, for the first time in English translation, Brecht's own writings on the new film and broadcast technologies that revolutionised arts and communication in the early part of the twentieth century

This book includes all of Brecht's theoretical writing about film, radio, broadcasting and the new media written between 1919 and 1956 as well as all of his important screenplays produced during the 1920s and 1930s. Screenplays written during this time ...

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Overview

This volume gathers together, for the first time in English translation, Brecht's own writings on the new film and broadcast technologies that revolutionised arts and communication in the early part of the twentieth century

This book includes all of Brecht's theoretical writing about film, radio, broadcasting and the new media written between 1919 and 1956 as well as all of his important screenplays produced during the 1920s and 1930s. Screenplays written during this time include an early sound-film adaptation of The Threepenny Opera, and a collaboration with Fritz Lang, Hangmen Also Die. Brecht's writings on the new media document his fascination with it from Weimar Germany to Hollywood and the movie industry.

A must for students of Brecht and film studies alike.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780413725004
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
  • Publication date: 7/1/2003
  • Series: Diaries, Letters and Essays Series
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.81 (d)

Meet the Author


Bertolt Bertolt (1898-1956) was the most influential German dramatist and theoretician of the theater in the 20th century. Also a poet of formidable gifts and considerable output, Brecht first attracted attention in the Berlin of the 1920s as the author of provocative plays that challenged the tenets of traditional theater. Forced to flee Germany in 1933 because of his leftist political beliefs and opposition to the Nazi regime of Adolf Hitler, Brecht and his family spent 14 years in exile in Scandinavia and the United States. Although he tried hard to become established in the United States, Brecht failed to make a breakthrough either as a scriptwriter in Hollywood, California, or as a playwright on Broadway. Two years later he moved to East Berlin and remained there until his death. In the 1950s he became an internationally acclaimed playwright and director through productions of his plays by the Berliner Ensemble, a company based in East Berlin and headed by his wife, actor Helene Weigel.
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Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Introduction
Acknowledgements
Pt. I Texts and Fragments on the Cinema (1919-55)
On Life in the Theatre 3
On Film 4
The German Chamber Film 5
Less Certainty!!! 5
From the ABCs of the Epic Theatre 6
Mutilated Films 8
The World is Yours 9
Intoxicating Effect 9
V-Effects of Chaplin 10
The Verfremdungseffekt in the Other Arts 10
On Film Music 10
Wilhelm Dieterle's Gallery of Grand-Bourgeois Figures 19
Efforts to Save the Film The Axe of Wandsbek 20
On the Filming of Literary Texts 21
On the Courage Film 22
Questions [about the Courage Film] 23
File Note [Courage Film] 24
The Film Mother Courage 26
On the Puntila Script 27
The Storytelling Women in the Estate Kitchen [Puntila Film] 28
Billiard Room in the Hotel Tavastberg [Puntila Film] 29
Pt. II Texts on Radio Broadcasting (1926-1932)
Young Drama and the Radio 33
Suggestions for the Director of Radio Broadcasting 35
Radio - An Antediluvian Invention? 36
On Utilizations 38
Explanations [about The Flight of the Lindberghs] 38
The Radio as a Communications Apparatus 41
Pt. III Early screenplays (1921)
The Mystery of the Jamaica Bar 49
The Jewel Eater 79
Three in the Tower 100
Pt. IV The Threepenny Material (1930-1932)
The Bruise - A Threepenny Film 131
No Insight through Photography 144
On the Discussion about Sound Film 144
Meddling with the Poetic Substance 145
The Experiment is Dead, Long Live the Experiment! 146
The Threepenny Lawsuit 147
Pt. V The Kuhle Wampe Film (1932)
Film without Commercial Value 203
The Sound Film Kuhle Wampe or Who Owns the World? 204
The Film Kuhle Wampe 206
Short Contribution on the Theme of Realism 207
Kuhle Wampe or Who Owns the World? [scene segmentation] 209
Translator's Notes 259
Index of Works by Bertolt Brecht 269
General Index 271
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