Music for Airports

Music for Airports

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by Brian Eno
     
 

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Sometimes music from two different, distant points comes together in a strange way. When Brian Eno composed Music for Airports in 1978 he was best known as a New Wave rocker and a producer of such cutting-edge bands as Roxy Music and Talking Heads. With this electronic work --

Overview

Sometimes music from two different, distant points comes together in a strange way. When Brian Eno composed Music for Airports in 1978 he was best known as a New Wave rocker and a producer of such cutting-edge bands as Roxy Music and Talking Heads. With this electronic work -- which he classified as "ambient music" -- Eno suddenly met the mesmerizing minimalism of Philip Glass and Terry Riley head on. But the cool sonic textures of Music for Airports is pure Eno, and looking back from today's perspective his originality is even more striking. Bang on a Can, a New-York-based New Music ensemble, has taken the recording of Music for Airports and painstakingly transcribed it, adapting the synthesized sounds so they could be played live by a combination of acoustic and electronic instruments. The result is incandescent.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stewart Mason
Brian Eno's 1979 milestone Music for Airports was the first album to feature his term "ambient music," although 1975's Discreet Music and 1978's Music for Films had already been exploratory steps in that direction. It's entirely possible that Eno knew at the time that he was inventing a new form of music, but he might not have known just what a milestone Music for Airports would turn out to be, or that it would be the first ambient work to get its own tribute album. The New York-based new music collective Bang on a Can celebrated Music for Airports' 20th anniversary by writing new transcriptions of the album's four lengthy pieces. It's incorrect to say that the group orchestrated the album, because these pieces take care to replicate Eno's originals exactly, down to each piece being precisely the same length its original. The only difference is that Eno's original Music for Airports was constructed out of tape loops and this version uses live musicians. That one change makes all the difference in the world. The use of live musicians, especially on "2/1," which is a vocal work for female chorus, opens up the pieces sonically; what had felt squashed and artificial on Eno's original now breathes. This tribute doesn't replace Eno's essential original, but it's fascinating listening for any fan of the artist's ambient work.

Product Details

Release Date:
02/24/1998
Label:
Philips
UPC:
0731453684720
catalogNumber:
536847

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Brian Eno   Primary Artist
Bang On A Can   Primary Artist,Track Performer
Robert Black   Bass
Evan Ziporyn   Bass Clarinet
Maya Beiser   Cello
Matt Goeke   Cello
Greg Hesselink   Cello
Mark Stewart   Cello,Electric Guitar,Mandocello,Mandolin
Chris Komer   Horn
Lisa Moore   Keyboards,Piano
Steven Schick   Percussion
Wu Man   Pipa
Julie Josephson   Trombone
Christopher Washburne   Trombone
Todd Reynolds   Violin
Katie Geissinger   Voices
Phyllis Jo Kubey   Voices
Alexandra Montano   Voices
Wayne duMaine   Trumpet
Tom Hoyt   Trumpet

Technical Credits

Michael Gordon   Arranger,Art Direction
David Lang   Arranger,Art Direction
Julia Wolfe   Arranger,Art Direction
Evan Ziporyn   Arranger,Producer
Gordon Jee   Art Direction
John Pace   Engineer
Eric Calvi   Producer
Philip Glass   Executive Producer
Rory Johnston   Executive Producer
Kurt Munkasci   Executive Producer

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Music for Airports 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago