The Bride of Lammermoor

The Bride of Lammermoor

3.7 8
by Walter Scott
     
 

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The most haunting and Shakespearean of Sir Water Scott's novels, The Bride of Lammermoor is a fast-paced tragedy set in late seventeenth-century Scotland. The book opens as Lord Ravenswood dies in a furious rage, deprived of his title and removed from his estate by a clever lawyer, Sir William Ashton.His son, the Master of Ravenswood, inherits his…  See more details below

Overview

The most haunting and Shakespearean of Sir Water Scott's novels, The Bride of Lammermoor is a fast-paced tragedy set in late seventeenth-century Scotland. The book opens as Lord Ravenswood dies in a furious rage, deprived of his title and removed from his estate by a clever lawyer, Sir William Ashton.His son, the Master of Ravenswood, inherits his father's bitterness against Ashton, and lives in his family's sole remaining homestead, the ruined tower of Wolf's Crag. But when Ravenswood falls in love with Ashton's daughter, the shy, beautiful Lucy, her diabolical mother takes extreme measures to thwart the match. Lady Ashton forces her daughter to marry another man, the Laird of Bucklaw, and Lucy agrees, despairing that her true love has abandoned her. When Ravenswood reappears directly after the wedding, he flies into a fury and challenges Lucy's husband and brother to duels. That same night, Lucy stabs Bucklaw and dies soon after. Ravenswood, rushing to meet his erstwhile opponents, dies as well, swallowed by quicksand. A story of immense, gloomy power, infused with unforgiving spirit and loneliness of the Scottish Isles, The Bride of Lammermoor's somber tone is relieved by the comic effect of Ravenswood's elderly butler, Caleb Baldertsone, and his increasingly desperate and ridiculous attempts to rehabilitate the family's name.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Published in 1819 and 1824, respectively, these titles are typical of Scott's historical soap operas involving revenge, kidnapping, love, political turmoil, and what have you. To help readers understand the Scottish dialect in Scott's writing, these include glossaries as well as scholarly introductions. Both books are based on Scott's original texts. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
This new edition restores the action of the novel to 1703, before the Union of Scotland and England in 1707, rather than after it, which is where Scott's revisions of 1830 placed it. Critical apparatus includes an account of the textual history of the novel, explanatory notes, a list of verbal changes from the first-edition text, and a glossary. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780460872331
Publisher:
Everyman Paperback
Publication date:
12/15/1993
Series:
World's Classics Series
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.76(h) x 0.83(d)

Meet the Author

Sir Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh in 1771. Educated for the law, he obtained the office of sheriff-depute of Selkirkshire in 1799 and in 1806 the office of clerk of session, a post whose duties he fulfilled for some twenty-five years. His lifelong interest in Scottish antiquity and the ballads which recorded Scottish history led him to try his hand at narrative poems of adventure and action. The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810) made his reputation as one of the leading poets of his time. A novel, Waverley, which he had begun in 1805, was published anonymously in 1814. Subsequent novels appeared with the note “by the author of Waverley”; hence his novels often are called collectively “the Waverley novels.” Some of the most famous of these are Old Mortality (1816), Rob Roy (1817), Ivanhoe (1819), Kenilworth (1821), and Quentin Durward (1823). In recognition of his literary work Scott was made a baronet in 1819. During his last years he held various official positions and published biographies, editions of Swift and Dryden, tales, lyric poetry, and various studies of history and antiquity. He died in 1832.

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