Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy [NOOK Book]

Overview

Bridget Jones—one of the most beloved characters in modern literature (v.g.)—is back! In Helen Fielding's wildly funny, hotly anticipated new novel, Bridget faces a few...

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Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy

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Overview

Bridget Jones—one of the most beloved characters in modern literature (v.g.)—is back! In Helen Fielding's wildly funny, hotly anticipated new novel, Bridget faces a few rather pressing questions:   

What do you do when your girlfriend’s sixtieth birthday party is the same day as your boyfriend’s thirtieth?

Is it better to die of Botox or die of loneliness because you’re so wrinkly?

Is it wrong to lie about your age when online dating?

Is it morally wrong to have a blow-dry when one of your children has head lice?

Is it normal to be too vain to put on your reading glasses when checking your toy boy for head lice?

Does the Dalai Lama actually tweet or is it his assistant?

Is it normal to get fewer followers the more you tweet?

Is technology now the fifth element? Or is that wood?

If you put lip plumper on your hands do you get plump hands?

Is sleeping with someone after two dates and six weeks of texting the same as getting married after two meetings and six months of letter writing in Jane Austen’s day?

Pondering these and other modern dilemmas, Bridget Jones stumbles through the challenges of loss, single motherhood, tweeting, texting, technology, and rediscovering her sexuality in—Warning! Bad, outdated phrase approaching!—middle age.

In a triumphant return after fourteen years of silence, Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy is timely, tender, touching, page-turning, witty, wise, outrageous, and bloody hilarious.

TODAY Book Club Selection

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  • Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy
    Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy  

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

It's been all too long since we last saw Bridget Jones: The second novel was published fifteen years ago and it's been almost a decade since the journaling Londoner appeared on the screen. Fortunately, that wait is over. With Mad About the Boy, Bridget wrestles lovably awkwardly with worries about aging, the dangers of personal texting late at night while inebriated, and other common problems of the new millennium. A new Bridget published almost simultaneously in English and Spanish language editions and NOOK Books. (P.S. Speaking of new Bridgets, a new movie about her is due sometime next year.)

The New York Times Book Review - Sarah Lyall
Do we really want to hear about the middle-aged escapades of Bridget Jones…Hapless, inept, prone to romantic calamity, lurching from one mishap to the next through a hazy fog of faux pas and cigarette smoke, Bridget was so specific to her age that allowing her to reach 51 feels like a violation of the natural order of the fictional universe, as if a new Harry Potter book had him using magic to refinance his mortgage. So what a pleasant shock to find that the latest Bridget Jones installment, Mad About the Boy, is not only sharp and humorous, despite its heroine's aged circumstances, but also snappily written, observationally astute and at times genuinely moving. Fielding has somehow pulled off the neat trick of holding to her initial premise—single woman looks for romance—while allowing her heroine to grow up into someone funnier and more interesting than she was before.
Publishers Weekly
10/21/2013
England's sweetheart Bridget Jones returns after over a decade in Field's latest novel (after Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason). Bridget, now a single mother to two young children, is trying to catch up with the rest of the world. Just figuring out how to program the remote and her son's X-box is overwhelming enough, but now her friends are pushing her to get back into the dating scene. Determined to stay hip, Bridget is dating Roxster, a man 15 years her junior, who she meets through her trials and errors on Twitter. But juggling motherhood and a new boyfriend, while dealing with producers trying to turn her screenplay from tragedy to comedy may be more than Bridget can handle. Whether she is unintentionally announcing her family's head lice infestation to her production team or getting stuck in a tree while looking after her daughter, fans will find Fielding's third Bridget Jones installment hilarious and thoroughly entertaining. This book is sure to be a hit among new and old readers alike. Fielding's awkwardly charming character has aged well—but of course not gracefully. (Oct.)
From the Publisher

“Sharp and humorous. . . . Snappily written, observationally astute. . . . Genuinely moving.” —The New York Times Book Review

“Bridget’s back! And as irrepressible as ever. . . . Sweet, clever, and funny.” —People

“A clever mashup of texts, emails, tweets, and diary entries from Bridget, a bighearted person who brings hearty humor to the ordinary vicissitudes of life. . . . Fielding’s wit is generous and forgiving.” —Chicago Tribune
 
“Fielding’s comic gifts . . . are once again on shimmering exhibit.” —Elle

“Tender and comic.” —The New Yorker

“Feels like visiting with your funniest friend.” —Entertainment Weekly

“Delightful. . . . Bridget Jones was a character made for the Internet, from her confessional tone to her casual creation of memes.” —Los Angeles Times

“Sweet and satisfying. . . . Bridget still has her posse of funny friends and her shelf of self-help books.” —USA Today

“Helen has always had a sharp eye for the obsessions and neuroses of our times, a talent much in evidence here—her [Bridget’s] liability rests very much on her believability.” —Anna Wintour, editor in chief of Vogue

“Very funny.” —The Boston Globe

“Sweet, clever and funny. Yay Bridget!” —People (five stars)

“Fielding has somehow pulled off the neat trick of holding to her initial premise—single woman looks for romance—while allowing her heroine to grow up into someone funnier and more interesting than she was before. . . . Mad About the Boy, is not only sharp and humorous . . . but also snappily written, obser­vationally astute and at times genuinely moving. . . . Bridget-the-parent is like a character in a Russian novel, lurching constantly from ecstasy to despair, sometimes in the course of a single paragraph. . . . Its big heart, incisive observations, nice sentences, vivid characters and zippy pace make it a book you could happily spend the night with. It is possible I cried a little at the end, but then, as Bridget might say: am sucker for happy endings.” —Sarah Lyall, The New York Times Book Review

“As Bridget might say, it’s ‘v. v. good.’ . . . [She’s] still hilarious and hopeful, even while making crazy mistakes and pointed asides and romancing a sexy younger man.” —Minneapolis Star Tribune

“I read the book. I loved it. I loved her. She’s smart, she’s funny and she makes us all feel like we’re good just the way we are.” —Jenna Bush Hager, Today

“Just as Helen Fielding did with the dating world of London in the 1990s, she now casts her laser-sharp eyes on midlife and parenthood. . . . Fielding’s wit is generous and forgiving. . . . A clever mashup of texts, emails, tweets, and diary entries from Bridget, a big­hearted person who brings hearty humor to the ordi­nary vicissitudes of life.” —Chicago Tribune

“Inimitable. . . . If you don’t shed a few tears in the course of this book, you must have a heart of ice.” —The Guardian (London)

“Fielding’s comic gifts—and, just as important, her almost anthropological ability to nose out all that is trendy and potentially crazy-making about contem­porary culture, from Twitter (‘OMG, Lady Gaga has 33 million followers! Complete meltdown. Why am I even bothering? Twitter is giant popularity contest which I am doomed to be the worst at’) to online dating—are once again on shimmering exhibit. And Bridget is still recognizably her ditzy but ultimately unfazable self. . . . [Has] the sort of narrative propul­sion that is rare in autobiographically conceived fic­tion, not to mention an unsolipsistic world view (for all of Bridget’s fussing over herself) that invites broad reader identification.” —Daphne Merkin, Elle

“She’s back! Our favorite hapless heroine returns after a decade-plus hiatus, juggling two kids, potential boyfriends, smug marrieds, rogue gadgets, and her nascent Twitter feed.” —Vogue

“With Bridget Jones’s Diary, Helen Fielding created a new female archetype. Now she’s brought Bridget back to conquer the twenty-first century. . . . The diary form itself pays homage to Austen, lifting Fielding’s work above many pale imitations. Austen’s heroines aren’t writers, but Fielding’s is. . . . Aus­ten’s plots are marriage plots, and ultimately so are Bridget’s. But Fielding’s novels (like Austen’s, and like Sex and the City and Girls) also revolve around friendship—something at which Bridget excels. Nor is the character’s staying power an accident. Field­ing . . . is still very much a writer.” —Radhika Jones, Time

“A character like Bridget Jones is so beloved that she becomes something of a virtual best friend. . . . [The] third Bridget romp is every bit as engaging, hilarious and sometimes downright naughty as the first two: perfect light reading after a long day of holiday shop­ping, online dating or herding co-workers.” —Dallas Morning News

“Fielding manages to both move and delight the reader time after time. . . . Hilarious.” —New York Journal of Books 

Library Journal
If you don't know that Fielding is bringing back her beloved Bridget Jones, the character that sold 15 million copies worldwide and launched a movie franchise, then you've been hiding under a rock for months. The setting is contemporary London, and like all of us Bridget has moved on. No more plot details, but at least the title should be settled by BookExpo America.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385350877
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/15/2013
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 1,886
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Helen Fielding
HELEN FIELDING, a journalist and novelist, is the author of four previous novels--Bridget Jones's Diary, Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason, Cause Celeb, and Olivia Joules and the Overactive Imagination.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Reading Group Guide

1. Who is “the boy”? Is it who you first thought it would be?

2. How did you react when you read about Mark Darcy’s fate?

3. Age is a major theme in this novel. Why does Bridget feel the struggles more acutely than some of her contemporaries? 

4. Bridget’s friends deal with aging in different ways. Talitha believes in Botox while Bridget notes that Woney has not done any of this “rebranding” (page 66). Why do these different characters make these different decisions?

5. Dating rules have changed dramatically since Bridget’s last appearance. How well does she adapt?

6. Bridget is adapting Hedda Gabbler, which she explains is a story about “the perils of trying to live through men” (page 17). What is Fielding’s intent with this parallel?

7. In what ways did Daniel change from the previous books? And how did he stay the same?

8. Why does Roxster tell Bridget he “hearts” her? (page 250). Does he really mean “love,” or is this something else?

9. Mr. Wallaker tells Bridget, “. . . other people’s lives are not always as perfect as they appear, once you crack the shell” (page 323). How does Bridget finally learn this lesson? What earlier opportunities did she have to learn it?

10. On page 361, Tom tells Bridget about a new survey: “It proves that the quality of someone’s relationships is the biggest indicator of their long-term emotional health—not so much the ‘significant other’ relationship, as the measure of happiness is not your husband or boyfriend but the quality of the other relationships you have around you.” How does this bode for Bridget? Which characters might have cause for concern? 

11. At the carol concert, Mr. Wallaker looks at Bridget in a certain way and she realizes she loves him. What finally brings her around?

12. What is the significance of the owl?

13. Bridget’s last entry ties up the story in a cozy, comforting way. What do you imagine will happen next?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 73 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(27)

4 Star

(19)

3 Star

(8)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(14)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 73 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 27, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    I was apprehensive when I read that Darcy was dead prior to the

    I was apprehensive when I read that Darcy was dead prior to the book release. I wondered if this were an
    Author's last bid to cash in on a once popular protagonist. Happily, I was wrong to worry.

    The narrative voice, so quotable, true and hilarious I previous outings, is both fiercely honest and heartbreakingly real. 
    Bridget remains relatable, hysterically funny and observant and more relevant than an icon has a right to be.I would Give it six stars if I could. To all detractors who thought. The death of mark Darcy heralded the end of the world, quit whining and read it!

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2013

    Bittersweet

    I laughed. I cried. This 3rd Bridget is a charm. Less over the top than 1st two novels: more depth, more emotion, more empathy. Highly recommend.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2013

    Not good skip it

    The book was sad throughout. I didnt like it near as much as her other books. This one was a great disappoinment and worse than cause celeb one. There were so many other stories she could have told and handle Mark, Daniel and Mr Jones in better ways. Who cares that life isnt always happy.

    We read books like Bridget Jones to escape our own misery and laugh. I found very little laughter here. Pkus, the owl reminded me of Harry Potter rather thsn the reincarnation effect she wanted. Kissing at tge end was sort of like the first book, snoe and all. Different but much the same. Vomit, lice, all were unnecessary.

    The writing didnt sparkle and it was mournful. Save your money unlessyou want to cray about the book and spending money.

    This is the last book l buy from this author. Ive bought all her books in past. It was a HUGE time waster to read. Pity Bridget was always goodfor a laugh. I also disliked the political reference and Buddhist stuff. Didnt add anything to the plot.

    5 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2013

    Just lovely. The book is lovely and bittersweet. The author do

    Just lovely.

    The book is lovely and bittersweet. The author does not pick up where she left off, so Bridget Jones is all grown up now. In the era of “leaning in” and “having it all”, she is still disarmingly charming and delightfully imperfect. While the idea of a 51-year old Bridget may be hard to accept at first, her struggles, dreams, illusions and disappointments are more real and heartfelt than ever before. For the original fans of the series, the reading serves as a gentle reminder that they, too, grew older over the past fifteen years but that the joy of love, laughter, family and "cuddles" can be found at any age.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2013

    Depressing

    This book tried too hard. Twitter is confusing? Online dating is hard? These aren't exaxtly fresh observations. The author tries to recapture the sparle of the original (and to a lesser extent the second novel) and just fails. Spoiler etiquette forbids me from revealing more, but Spoiler colors the whole novel and not in the bittersweet way I think Fielding meant.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 9, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Bridget Jones has been off the radar for many years now, because

    Bridget Jones has been off the radar for many years now, because the last novel ended with a Happily
    Ever After.

    However, time has passed, life doesn't generally grant us HEA's, and Jonesy is again neck-deep in the
    complications of life, including dealing with two v. young children. Some fans may be ticked off that
    (spoiler alert) the author did not allow Bridget and Mark Darcy to live to a ripe old age as a married
    couple. But if she had, this book would not exist, and I ENJOYED this book tremendously, found it
    believable, poignant in more than a few places, and laugh-out-loud hilarious in others,

    The humor is still stellar and entirely relatable. Here's one of Bridget's (and my own) resolutions:
    "Deal with emails immediately and so that email becomes effective means of communication instead
    of terrifying Unexploded Email in-box full of guilt trips and undetonated time-vampire bombs." Yes,
    well, something about good intentions, hell...

    Social Media distracts her from what she SHOULD be working on: "...Is absolutely imperative not to
    tweet today, but finish screenplay. Have just got to do the ending. Oh, and the middle lot. And sort out
    the start."

    Regarding online dating, Bridget's friend Tom uses this catchy metaphor for a potential partner with
    whom he is flirting: "All text and no trousers." Then there was the twunken (drunken Tweeting) bird
    fiasco...

    Bridget's mental digressions are delicious: "he picked me up in his arms, as if I was light as a feather,
    which I am not, unless it was a very heavy feather, maybe from a giant prehistoric dinosaur-type bird..."

    It works as a stand-alone even if you haven't read the previous novels. If you have, it offers a peek at
    the glory of Mark and Bridget's past married life. It offers all the delights of mummyhood including lice
    infestations, vomiting, and cuddling in bed at storytime.

     I'm mad about this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2013

    I was a little worried going into it that Mark dying was going t

    I was a little worried going into it that Mark dying was going to mean there was no way this book could be as good... boy was I wrong! Finished the entire book in one day while traveling. Could not stop myself. The same ole Bridget we've grown to know and love, and gives me hope that I'm not the only crazy one out there counting down the minutes since a silly boy responded and obsessing over what I said/should've said. If you loved the first two, trust me on this, you'll love this one as well.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2013

    Without giving anything away, I was VERY disappointed with the w

    Without giving anything away, I was VERY disappointed with the way the author decided to continue this series. That said, it was still classic Bridget Jones. I laughed, I cried, and I cheered for her once more.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2013

    Hard to Get into But Satisfying

    It was a little hard to get into because Bridget has aged since we last saw her and her life is completely different than one would expect. However, once you get over the initial shock, you find the old Bridget we know and love at the heart of the book. And in the end, it's a satisfying read. The end very literally justifies the means.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 11, 2013

    Had to read it but not as good as the first two were.

    Bridget is in her early 50s and her life is very different than when she was on the Edge of Reason. This one was a little slow, I got tired of so much of the "texting" format to advance the story and looked forward to actual printed paragraphs. That being said, Fielding wrote some hilarious scenes such as the dilemma where "one can't wear reading glasses when nit combing young lover's hair". I love that Bridget feels like she's half assing most of her life but still likes herself. If you read the first two books, you should read this one too because you need to know how it turns out.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 22, 2013

    funny

    hi everybody, I barely speak English, so don't care too much about mistakes in this review. I read all 2 previous Bridget Jones books and I was looking forward to see what happens to her after more than 15 years, so I was surprised to see that not too much was changed in the way she approaches to life. does the author want to say that even a lot of - also sad- things happens to us, we are not able to change our way to face reality? same group of friends suggesting her what to do, same way to waste time during all day, same weird way to approach men, same delusions and at the end a magical outcome like things happen even you are not working hard to make them happen. that's my point of view...nicoletta

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2013

    Terrible book do not read

    This book should have been bridget getting married having children and dealing with fitting into marks world and especially acting like a grown up not being a tramp and neglecting your kids

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2013

    Not particularly fresh or interesting. Touching memories about M

    Not particularly fresh or interesting. Touching memories about Mark, but the fact that she killed him speaks poorly of her writing. Mark and Bridget are interesting enough without Fielding having to fall back to Bridget-looking-for love plot. 


    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2013

    Sad

    I didn't finish it,life is too ssd already... the idea of Mark being gone was too much. :/

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2013

    Hi, I have only one question :) This book has really original si

    Hi, I have only one question :) This book has really original signature by Helen Fielding? I'd like to buy this book for my wife ;)
    J.C.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2014

    I really enjoyed the escapism of this book,  managed to get thro

    I really enjoyed the escapism of this book,  managed to get through it in 2 days on holidays with a lot of laughs.  

    Things I liked
    tender moments about missing Mark very emotional but did not dwell on the misery for too long
    Bridgets  general 'oh sod it' attitude thinking she's royally effed something up (when of course she hasn't).  I know i think i am doing a terrible job of things and it was a refreshing reminder not to be so hard on yourself and that there are more important things in life
    really great jokes and laugh out loud moments in the book

    Although i loved the book and would recommend it highly as a pick me up, things i didn't like:
    you don't get insights to Bridget as a married woman
    Bridget doesn't seem to have developed much of a career for herself
    The whole 30 year old hunk with 51 year old mother was just too far fetched.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2014

    To still bad.

    You were in the goldflinch, huh?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2014

    K

    U kcglnk yt

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2014

    Still Bad.?!

    Bad.
    Bad?
    Bad!

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  • Posted March 16, 2014

    I was completely unaware that this book existed. Being a fan of

    I was completely unaware that this book existed. Being a fan of the previous two, I was happy to see it especially as I had just finished a re-read of the first two books. It was not anything I had expected at all and felt myself quite anxiety ridden upon the beginning the book. I almost put it down but in the end I'm glad I didn't.

    Even being a huge fan of Mark Darcy, I loved this book. Would have rather he not died at all but I think Ms. Fielding wrote with such depth of emotion that it made it very believable. Found myself with tears welling up in my eyes more than once. That to me is a sign of good writing. Bridget is as bumbling as ever only now "middle aged" and I'm glad she was sorted out well. I think most of the bad reviews are from those who couldn't get over the Mark Darcy thing (understandable) BUT- I maintain that MS. Fielding did a good job with this novel.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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