Bridget's Beret

( 1 )

Overview

Bridget loves to draw, and she likes to wear a beret for inspiration. So when her beloved hat blows away, Bridget searches for it high and low. She files a Missing Beret Report. She even considers other hats, but none of them feel quite right. It’s no use; without her beret, Bridget can’t seem to draw. How will she overcome her artist’s block?

Make sure to check out Bridget’s notebook scribbles at the end of the book for her thoughts and ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (21) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $9.54   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Bridget loves to draw, and she likes to wear a beret for inspiration. So when her beloved hat blows away, Bridget searches for it high and low. She files a Missing Beret Report. She even considers other hats, but none of them feel quite right. It’s no use; without her beret, Bridget can’t seem to draw. How will she overcome her artist’s block?

Make sure to check out Bridget’s notebook scribbles at the end of the book for her thoughts and facts on art!

Bridget's Beret is a 2011 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Unexpectedly clever.” The Washington Post

“Hilarious…A witty, well-shaped story…and a clever homage to many of the Great Artists and their works, from Leonardo to Warhol. – Kirkus, Starred

 

“There are great suggestions at the back of the book for getting started on new projects.” –OrlandoSentinel

“This smart, saucy book, with its spacious cartoon-style art, is both a spur to artistic endeavor and a message about inspiration and hard work. Yet the motivations are cocooned by a crackin’ good tale and tempered by a full-faceted heroine. Tips for readers about creating their own art neatly complete an already strong package that can easily be worked into the curriculum.”—Booklist, Starred Review

Lichtenheld takes this story beyond predictable spirit-was-in-you-all-along take by providing a respectful, age-appropriate acknowledgement of the fickleness of the artistic muse”—Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

“Lichtenheld’s ink, colored pencil, and watercolor cartoon illustrations, heavy on line and filled with childlike drawings, add humor and character to the story.”—School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Bridget, a budding artist, loves to draw, particularly outdoors. She is sure that her most important art supply is her big black beret, like the ones she has seen on many "Great Artists." So when the wind blows her beret away, she fears that her art has gone with it. After trying other hats in vain, Bridget simply gives up. When her little sister Jessie asks her to make a sign for her lemonade stand, Bridget resists at first. But then, since it is only a sign, she agrees. As she paints, however, it becomes more than a sign. She paints many "masterpieces" until there is an art show opening around the lemonade stand. And even without the beret, Bridget finds herself "back where she belonged." The visual tale has a lighthearted quality. Casual black ink outlines, colored pencils, and lightly applied watercolors create cartoony figures with skinny arms and legs and large heads characteristic of young children. Emotions are clearly seen. The double page of nine vignettes showing Bridget trying on different hats is particularly amusing. The final two pages are devoted to hints on "How to Start Your Art" for those with artist's block. A variety of exercises using famous pictures as models should inspire young readers. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Kirkus Reviews
Bridget thinks she gets her artistic abilities from the black beret she, along with all the Great Artists, always wears. So when she loses it, her career is over. Days later, her sister asks the stymied Bridget if she'll paint a sign for a lemonade stand. Can she do it sans beret? Each cartoonish spread-rendered in cheerful watercolors, colored pencil and ink-is riddled with wry references to the art world. Bridget's artwork on display in the kitchen, for example, is captioned: "She created many masterpieces. Some went on permanent exhibit." Next to her sidewalk-chalk drawing: "Others were only available for limited viewing." In comic-strip-style panels, Bridget is shown trying on alternative hats to hilarious effect-Mom's oversized gardening hat is met with "Draw?! I can't even SEE!" To the coonskin cap, she simply says "Gross." A witty, well-shaped story about the dubious necessity of lucky hats and a clever homage to many of the Great Artists and their works, from Leonardo to Warhol. ("How to Start Your Art" idea section) (Picture book. 5-8)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3—Author/illustrator Tom Lichtenheld introduces this video of the book (Holt, 2010) in his studio. He explains that he was inspired to write the book by his niece, who loves to draw. Then there's Bridget, who "…liked to draw as much as other kids liked ice cream." In the tradition of greats like Picasso, Monet, and Rembrandt, the little artist sports a big black beret when she creates, until a gust of wind lifts it right off her head. Despite filing a missing beret report and offering a generous reward, her beloved beret is gone. Gone too, apparently, is her ability to draw. She tries other hats such as her mom's gardening hat, a stocking cap, dad's fishing hat, and a propeller hat—but she remains uninspired. She cries, sulks, and pouts, unable to conquer her artist's block. When her little sister entreats her to make a sign for her lemonade stand, she agrees reluctantly. The paper, paints, and brushes inspire her to create not one, but many signs, paying tribute to such icons as Andy Warhol. The ink, colored-pencil, and watercolor cartoons spring to life in this humorous tale of a little girl who can't resist the appeal of a paint set. The camera zooms in and out, scrolls across the scene, and offers occasional movement to this iconographic film. The perky woodwinds and xylophone motif in the background add to this lighthearted tale about creativity.—Barbara Auerbach, P.S. 217, Brooklyn, NY
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805087758
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
  • Publication date: 4/27/2010
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 342,221
  • Age range: 4 - 7 Years
  • Lexile: AD690L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 10.20 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Tom Lichtenheld is the illustrator of the New York Times bestselling Duck Rabbit. He has also written and illustrated many popular books for children, including Everything I Know about Pirates and What Are You So Grumpy About. He lives in Geneva, Illinois, with his wife, Jan.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 29, 2012

    Wow! A definite must-read!

    Bridget is a talented young artist with a positive attitude. That is until she loses her favorite hat, her black beret. After the wind carries her beret off, Bridget believes it has taken her artistic ability with it. This story definitely opens doors to discuss believing in yourself, how your attitudes can affect others, and how important it is to encourage those we love. It includes famous paintings and the artists who created them which would make this book easy to integrate into an art lesson. Children and adults will enjoy the book for its easily understood plot and clear and colorful illustrations. I read this book with my seven-year-old niece-four times in a row before we could stop! A must-read for those who love picture books and those who just enjoy a good story!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)