Bright Not Broken: Gifted Kids, ADHD, and Autism

Bright Not Broken: Gifted Kids, ADHD, and Autism

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by Diane M. Kennedy, Rebecca S. Banks, Temple Grandin
     
 

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The future of our society depends on our gifted children—the population in which we’ll find our next Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, or Virginia Woolf.  Yet the gifts and talents of some of our most brilliant kids may never be recognized because these children fall into a group known as twice exceptional, or “2e.” Twice exceptional kids

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Overview

The future of our society depends on our gifted children—the population in which we’ll find our next Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, or Virginia Woolf.  Yet the gifts and talents of some of our most brilliant kids may never be recognized because these children fall into a group known as twice exceptional, or “2e.” Twice exceptional kids are both gifted and diagnosed with a disability—often ADHD or an Autism Spectrum Disorder—leading teachers and parents to overlook the child’s talents and focus solely on his weaknesses. Too often, these children get lost in an endless cycle of chasing diagnostic labels and are never given the tools to fully realize their own potential.

Bright Not Broken sheds new light on this vibrant population by identifying who twice exceptional children are and taking an unflinching look at why they’re stuck.  The first work to boldly examine the widespread misdiagnosis and controversies that arise from our current diagnostic system, it serves as a wake-up call for parents and professionals to question why our mental health and education systems are failing our brightest children.

Most importantly, the authors show what we can do to help 2e children, providing a whole child model for parents and educators to strengthen and develop a child’s innate gifts while also intervening to support the deficits.  Drawing on painstaking research and personal experience, Bright Not Broken offers groundbreaking insight and practical strategies to those seeking to help 2e kids achieve their full potential.

Diane M. Kennedy, author of The ADHD-Autism Connection, is a long time advocate, international speaker/trainer, and mother of three twice-exceptional sons.

Rebecca S. Banks, M.A., co-author of The ADHD-Autism Connection, is a veteran educator, national speaker/trainer, and mother of two twice-exceptional children.

Temple Grandin, Ph.D., is a professor, prolific author, and one of the most accomplished and renowned adults with autism in the world.

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Editorial Reviews

Identifying ADHD and autism can be a valuable tool, but it often comes at a price: Parents of children with one or both of these disabilities often worry themselves into ignoring that many of these kids are also gifted. Bright Not Broken sends a corrective message to both their parents and to the educational professionals who treat them, describing strategies to develop a child's innate gifts while also treating his or her deficits. In addition, this valuable book addresses widespread misdiagnosis that has only heightened parents' anxieties. Editor's recommendation.

From the Publisher
"This book is truly inspiring and it shows that by simply changing our perception of these children, and then the testing and education that stems from that perception, we can help them become successful, contributing adults." (psychcentral.com, March 13th, 2012)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780470623329
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
09/13/2011
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
313,729
Product dimensions:
6.32(w) x 9.22(h) x 1.10(d)

Meet the Author

Diane M. Kennedy, author of The ADHD-Autism Connection, is a longtime advocate, international speaker/trainer, and mother of three twice-exceptional sons.

Rebecca S. Banks, MA, coauthor of The ADHD-Autism Connection, is a veteran educator, national speaker/trainer, and mother of two twice-exceptional children.

Temple Grandin, PhD, is a professor, prolific author, and one of the most accomplished and renowned adults with autism in the world.

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Bright Not Broken 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Reviews-ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Karen P. for Readers Favorite "In Bright But Not Broken" two authors and one contributor set out to educate those who may be uninformed about dual-diagnoses (2e)children, specifically those diagnosed with ADHD or Autism combined with a diagnosis of gifted. Unfortunately, for this reader, there were way too many redundancies in the book for it to be truly helpful for those already possessing basic information about the disorders addressed in the book. There was a scathing review of mental health professionals and educators, both of whom must work within the confines and ethics of their respective professions with each and every child under their professional care. On a positive note, the various disorders are clearly defined for the reader so that those wondering why there is such confusion among the various diagnoses will surely get a good idea of the fact that as the special needs child develops, different emotional, cognitive and behavioral symptoms will manifest and it is those characteristics which are prominent at the time of evaluation and they will be assessed and noted. The biggest disappointment for the caretakers of special needs children will be the lack of attention to "How to Help Them", the last portion of the book. Despite the disappointments, I found this book to be very well-written and researched. The authors are obviously knowledgeable parents. One has three exceptional children and the other has two 2e children. The contributor is herself an adult with autism. I found the most positive and endearing aspect of the book to be the validation it gave to the thousands of parents who daily deal with the difficulties presented by the twice exceptional child. As in most of the health care profession, knowledge continues to surface and the sharing of information from one profession may eventually cause all of us to look at current spectrum of disorder in a totally different manner.
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Anonymous 11 months ago
Betyer than meh.