Brightness Falls

Brightness Falls

3.0 3
by Jay McInerney
     
 

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Combining the lyrical observation of F. Scott Fitzgerald with the laser-bright social satire of Evelyn Waugh, Jay McInerney gives us a novel that is stunningly accomplished and profoundly affecting. 
   As he maps the fault lines spreading through the once-impenetrable marriage of Russell and Corrine Calloway and chronicles Russell's wildly

Overview

Combining the lyrical observation of F. Scott Fitzgerald with the laser-bright social satire of Evelyn Waugh, Jay McInerney gives us a novel that is stunningly accomplished and profoundly affecting. 
   As he maps the fault lines spreading through the once-impenetrable marriage of Russell and Corrine Calloway and chronicles Russell's wildly ambitious scheme to seize control of the publishing house at which he works, Jay McInerney creates an elegy for New York in the 1980s. From the literary chimeras and corporate raiders to those dispossessed by the pandemonium of money and power, Brightness Falls captures a rash era at its moment of reckoning and gives reality back to a time that now seems decidedly unreal.




From the Trade Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
While the strengths of McInerney's writing are in evidence, the characterizations in this well-plotted generational portrait of late-'80s Manhattan yuppies fail to convince. A BOMC alternate and a three-week PW bestseller in cloth. Author tour. (Apr.)
Library Journal
The author of Bright Lights, Big City ( LJ 10/1/84) again offers an amusing and perceptive morality tale of Eighties excess. Russell Calloway, an editor for a major publishing house, and his stockbroker wife Corrine appear to be the perfect New York couple. Dissatisfied with the management of his publishing company, Russell organizes a hostile takeover bid and embarks on an affair with Trina, his investment banker. But he loses his shirt in the 1987 stock market crash, Corrine leaves him, and his best friend commits suicide. McInerney wryly examines the dilemma of people in their 30s who came of age with sex, drugs, and rock and roll and must now come to grips with adult responsibilities. Replete with ironic insight, wit, and style, this is highly recommended for popular fiction collections. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 2/1/92.-- Patricia Ross, Westerville P.L., Ohio
Sven Birkerts
Quick and compelling...a rich, detailed panorama of New York City life. The pace is Wolfean, with quick jump cuts from one charged encounter to the next. It's hard not to try to squeeze in one more chapter before putting out the lights at bedtime. -- Chicago Tribune

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307763228
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/17/2011
Series:
Vintage Contemporaries
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
26,769
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

Jay McInerney is the author of Bright Lights, Big City, Ransom, Story of My Life, Brightness Falls, The Last of the Savages, Model Behaviour, How It Ended and The Good Life. He lives in New York and Nashville.
Jay McInerney writes a wine column for the Wall Street Journal and is a regular contributor to the Guardian, the New York Times Book Review and Corriere della Sera. He has written seven novels, including Bright Lights, Big City, cited by Time as one of the nine generation-defining novels of the twentieth century, two short story collections and two non-fiction books on wine, one of which was the acclaimed A Hedonist in the Cellar. In 2006, he received the M.F.K. Fisher Distinguished Writing Award from the James Beard Foundation. He lives in Manhattan and Bridgehampton, New York.

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Brightness Falls 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
``Brightness Falls'' tracks the lives of book editor Russell Calloway, his wife Corrine and their friends in New York in the 1980s. Most of the book is set in the months before the stock market crash of 1987. Russell is likable throughout. Even when Russell is neglecting his wife he's doing it for the ``right'' reasons. As the market and their friends' incomes soar so does Russell's ambition. Russell swims with the sharks in organizing a hostile takeover of the publishing house he works for. This puts even greater strain on his marriage to Corrine, who is weary from the pace of New York and the Wall Street job she despises. McInerney is masterful in his use of symbols and echo. Party guests and news stories surface and resurface to make the buzz of New York and the pain of the characters very real. Loss comes to the couple through the descent of their best friend into drug use. Jeff Pierce and Russell, college literary friends who turned pro together, are fascinated with each other and secretly would like to exchange lives. This exchange theme is expanded upon by McInerney in ``The Last of the Savages,'' a later work. Loss through marital infidelity is also explored. Russell opens the way to infidelity and apparently commits adultery. (McInerney leaves you wondering whether the deed actually occurred. But the main point is that Russell feels unfaithful in his heart). Russell is later shaken when he learns Corrine had an affair years earlier. Russell has to deal with loss of wife, friends, job and money. Yet, at book's end, amid the tatters, Russell is quietly and bravely facing the future. And you can't help but admire that. Jay McInerney is a superb writer and ``Brightness Falls'' is his best work. I recommend it be read as a companion to his innovative ``Bright Lights, Big City.''
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago