Brilliance

( 4 )

Overview

A 2013 Edgar Award Nominee for Best Paperback Original

In Wyoming, a little girl reads people’s darkest secrets by the way they fold their arms. In New York, a man sensing patterns in the stock market racks up $300 billion. In Chicago, a woman can go invisible by being where no one is looking. They’re called “brilliants,” and since 1980, one percent of people have been born this way. Nick Cooper is among them; a federal agent, Cooper has gifts rendering him exceptional at ...

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Overview

A 2013 Edgar Award Nominee for Best Paperback Original

In Wyoming, a little girl reads people’s darkest secrets by the way they fold their arms. In New York, a man sensing patterns in the stock market racks up $300 billion. In Chicago, a woman can go invisible by being where no one is looking. They’re called “brilliants,” and since 1980, one percent of people have been born this way. Nick Cooper is among them; a federal agent, Cooper has gifts rendering him exceptional at hunting terrorists. His latest target may be the most dangerous man alive, a brilliant drenched in blood and intent on provoking civil war. But to catch him, Cooper will have to violate everything he believes in—and betray his own kind.

From Marcus Sakey, “a modern master of suspense” (Chicago Sun-Times) and “one of our best storytellers” (Michael Connelly), comes an adventure that’s at once breakneck thriller and shrewd social commentary; a gripping tale of a world fundamentally different and yet horrifyingly similar to our own, where being born gifted can be a terrible curse.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Sakey (The Two Deaths of Daniel Hayes) paints a near future too close for comfort in this stunning thriller, the first in a projected series. About 1% of American children born after 1986—known as abnorms, among other names—are particularly brilliant. A tiny percentage of these are problematic, like Erik Epstein, who understood stock market movements so well he made a fortune that led to the permanent closing of the New York Stock Exchange in 2011. Nick Cooper, a divorced former soldier and a member of Equitable Services, a U.S. government agency with the responsibility of tracking and killing abnorm terrorists, plays a dangerous cat-and-mouse game with the terrorists’ leader, John Smith, and with Shannon Azzi, Smith’s agent. Cooper calls Shannon “the Girl Who Walks Through Walls” for her ability to appear out of nowhere. When Cooper’s children come under threat, he pretends to defect from Equitable Services and reluctantly teams with Shannon. He soon finds his world giddily turning upside down while he sacrifices almost everything for justice and equality. In this parable of democracy’s downfall told in rapid-fire cuts, Sakey upends truths Cooper once thought self-evident, the truths people don’t seem to want any more, preferring instead, “safe lives and nice electronics and full fridges”—nothing less than the tragedy of our times. Agent: Scott Miller, Trident Media Group. (July)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781611099690
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio
  • Publication date: 7/16/2013
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Pages: 439
  • Sales rank: 54,819
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Marcus Sakey is the author of four novels, three of which are in development as feature films. He has been nominated for or won an Anthony, Barry, Macavity, and ITW Thriller Award.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 6, 2014

    One of the downsides of reading a lot of genre fiction is that y

    One of the downsides of reading a lot of genre fiction is that you are exposed to a lot of very poor writers. This is especially true if you are like me and will pick up anything that remotely sounds interesting. Yet, every so often it pays off in a big way. You are exposed to a book that is not a brilliantly written genre book, but a beautiful novel that happens to fit into a genre category. It is ironic that Marcus Sakey is writing about individuals with above average talents  when he himself rises above the everyday writer to create an amazing piece of literature.




    Ultimately Brilliance is a Science Fiction book that takes place in an alternate reality, a reality in which people with extraordinary abilities started being born in the 1980s. The main character is an agent sworn to protect the world from these individuals, however he is also one of them.




    This book is about the harsh realities of the world. It is about the scarifies of being a parent, and of standing up for what you believe in. It is also just really good fiction. It is a book that I could not stop reading, even when I had to put the book down. The plot never seemed to leave my head, the characters walked with me throughout my day. It is that good of a book.

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  • Posted June 19, 2014

    The cover of Brilliance displays a blurb from Lee Child: "t

    The cover of Brilliance displays a blurb from Lee Child: "the kind of story you've never read before." With all due respect to Child, I have read this story (and seen it on TV and in the movies) many times before.  Sakey, however, invigorates this familiar plot by making the "enemy" not some "other," but 10% of American's own citizens: "brilliants" born with amazing savant talents. What's fascinating, and at times downright terrifying, is Sakey's thorough exploration of the fears aroused in both factions (the "norms" and the "abnorms") and the horrible, albeit perfectly logical, actions provoked by those fears. It requires little imagination on the reader's part to substitute some other discrete group for the abnorms and to follow the chain of events to the same (apparently) inevitable conclusion.

    This human tendency to automatically divide into "us" and "them" has been evident in many a recent news story, both in the United States and abroad (witness the June 14 attacks in Mpeketoni, Kenya, in which Somali militants killed those who were not Muslim or who could not speak Somali). Through the non-threatening vehicle of science fiction, Sakey's Brilliance offers us the opportunity to thoughtfully consider the dangerous consequences of this tendency before we, too, find ourselves on opposite sides of an unnecessary divide.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2013

    Very gripping read. A mixture of x-men and Alphas. Not entirely

    Very gripping read. A mixture of x-men and Alphas. Not entirely unpredictable, but extremely enjoyable. Strongly recommend.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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