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Bring 'Em In
     

Bring 'Em In

5.0 1
by Buddy Guy
 
Buddy Guy's career and discography have been marked by inconsistency. Especially since his high-profile comeback in the early '90s, it seems he's been all too willing to turn over creative control on his albums, both for better and worse. Even just looking at the covers of those albums bears this out. 1991's Damn Right, I've Got the Blues has him dressed in

Overview

Buddy Guy's career and discography have been marked by inconsistency. Especially since his high-profile comeback in the early '90s, it seems he's been all too willing to turn over creative control on his albums, both for better and worse. Even just looking at the covers of those albums bears this out. 1991's Damn Right, I've Got the Blues has him dressed in your basic '90s casual dress, but the next album has him wearing overalls! Anyone who saw Guy live any number of times before that album was released would realize that he never wore overalls. Then fast forward to the neo-psychedelic look of Heavy Love. The productions themselves have been similarly schizophrenic: big, glossy guest star-laden albums to a heavy blues-rock sound to deep modal electric blues to acoustic albums. Well, this time out drummer/session man Steve Jordan is in the producer's chair, and it seems that he wanted to give Guy a more contemporary sound. To that end, the songs are mostly lifted from the soul/R&B world: tracks written by Curtis Mayfield, Isaac Hayes, Otis Redding, and Steve Cropper. The assembled core band -- Jordan on drums, Danny Kortchmar on guitar, Willie Weeks on bass, and Bernie Worrell on keys (mostly Fender Rhodes) -- are all solid players. There's a reason they've got probably thousands of credits between them, but the backing often comes off as professional rather than passionate. That can't be said of Guy, who always seems to bring plenty of passion to the proceedings, but for everything here that works, there's some kind of misstep. The Rhodes often adds a nice touch (as does the Optigan on "What Kind of Woman Is This?"), but the slick backing vocals on "Now You're Gone" and "I've Got Dreams to Remember" really don't fit. Guest star du jour John Mayer adds nothing to "I've Got Dreams to Remember" and neo-soulster Anthony Hamilton pretty much takes over "Lay Lady Lay." Carlos Santana is producer for a thoroughly Santana-fied version of Screamin' Jay Hawkins' "I Put a Spell on You" (right down to the "Oye Como Va" keyboard lick) that might have fit on a Santana album but really doesn't fit here. Robert Randolph's and Keith Richards' contributions fare better, with each fitting into the song nicely. "Somebody's Sleeping in My Bed" has some pretty hot guitar from Guy, but perhaps the album highlight is "Cut You Loose" because, well, he just cuts loose. Overall, Bring 'Em In is a mixed bag. Folks who liked Damn Right, I've Got the Blues and Feels Like Rain will surely find a lot to like here. Guy's performances are solid, but the settings don't always suit him as well as they could.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/27/2005
Label:
Imports
UPC:
0828767242620
catalogNumber:
5003137
Rank:
43919

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Buddy Guy   Primary Artist,Guitar,Vocals
Tracy Chapman   Vocals,Background Vocals
Ivan Neville   Keyboards,Background Vocals
Bernie Worrell   Keyboards,Vocals
Ben Cauley   Trumpet
Luis Conte   Percussion
Myron Dove   Bass
Jack Hale   Trombone
Jim Horn   Flute,Baritone Saxophone
Danny Kortchmar   Guitar
Andrew Love   Tenor Saxophone
Keith Richards   Guitar
Chester Thompson   Keyboards
Willie Weeks   Bass,Bass Guitar
Keb' Mo'   Guitar
Lannie McMIllian   Tenor Saxophone
Carlos Santana   Guitar,Rhythm Guitar
Anthony Hamilton   Vocals,Background Vocals
Steve Jordan   Drums,Background Vocals,Optigan
John Mayer   Guitar,Vocals,Background Vocals
Robert Randolph   Pedal Steel Guitar
Danny Kootch   Guitar

Technical Credits

Buddy Guy   Composer
Bob Dylan   Composer
Curtis Mayfield   Composer
Wilson Pickett   Composer
Otis Redding   Composer
Bill Withers   Composer
Willie Mitchell   Horn Arrangements
Jim Gaines   Engineer
Jalacy Hawkins   Composer
Jim Horn   Horn Arrangements
Bruce Irvine   Engineer
Mel London   Composer
Don Smith   Engineer
Lester Snell   Horn Arrangements
Keb' Mo'   Composer
Art Smith   Guitar Techician,Drum Technician
Carlos Santana   Producer
Zelma Redding   Composer
Martin Pradler   Engineer
Joe Rock   Composer
Steve Jordan   Producer
Kevin Houston   Engineer
Anita Marisa Boriboon   Art Direction

Customer Reviews

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Bring 'Em In 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What some less-familiar reviewers might see as a lack of consistancy from album to album is Buddy Guy showing his tremendous talent, versatility, and appreciation of other artists' work. Bringin' Em In is another great example of Mr. Guy tipping his hat to fellow artists, past and present. I have not seen any other musician, blues or otherwise, give so much back to their profession as Mr. Guy has done, nor any who have brought so many young artists to the forefront. Bring 'Em In is yet another winner from Buddy Guy wherein he allows others to shine alongside his own bright light. And, by the way, he often performs wearing overalls.