Bringing Yoga to Life: The Everyday Practice of Enlightened Living

Overview

Internationally renowned and bestselling author Donna Farhi moves yoga practice beyond the mat into our everyday lives, restoring the tradition's intended function as a complete, practical philosophy for daily living.

Expanding upon the teachings of Patanjali's Yoga Sutras, the core text of the yoga tradition, Donna Farhi describes yoga's transforming power as a complete life practice, far beyond its common reduction to mere exercise routine or stress management. This is the ...

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Overview

Internationally renowned and bestselling author Donna Farhi moves yoga practice beyond the mat into our everyday lives, restoring the tradition's intended function as a complete, practical philosophy for daily living.

Expanding upon the teachings of Patanjali's Yoga Sutras, the core text of the yoga tradition, Donna Farhi describes yoga's transforming power as a complete life practice, far beyond its common reduction to mere exercise routine or stress management. This is the philosophy of yoga as a path to a deeper awareness of self. Drawing upon her years of teaching with students, Farhi guides readers through all the pitfalls and promises of navigating a spiritual practice.

Farhi's engaging and accessible style and broad experience offer important teachings for newcomers and seasoned practitioners of yoga alike. And because her teachings of yoga philosophy extend into every corner of daily life, this book is an equally accessible guide to those seeking spiritual guidance without learning the pretzel bendings of the physical practice itself. As one of the top teachers worldwide, Farhi's exploration of the core philosophy of yoga is destined to become an instant classic.

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Editorial Reviews

Stephen Cope
“Practitioners the world around will be grateful to have this book.”
Judith Hanson Lasater
“Farhi presents in clear and imminently practical terms how we can live our yoga right now.”
Erich Schiffmann
“An intelligent work, a fun, interesting read, and a timely inspiration. Savor what Donna offers here.”
Yoga Journal
“Her wise and eloquent discourse... has illuminated the yoga tradition for the 21st century.”
Yoga Journal
“Her wise and eloquent discourse... has illuminated the yoga tradition for the 21st century.”
Publishers Weekly
Farhi (Yoga Mind, Body, and Spirit; The Breathing Book) explains how to begin the process of integrating the principles of yoga into daily living. This is not a book for seekers of a quick self-help fix; Farhi points out "the ancient science of Yoga does not pretend to be simple, quick, or easy." Rather, it's for readers interested in learning about the origins of yoga and using this deeper understanding to bring slow improvement to mind and body. Slow is an operative word-there's even a chapter on slowing down, which is the "precursor to yoga practice because this simple act allows us to consider our thoughts, feelings, and actions more carefully in the light of our desire to live peacefully." Other chapters address becoming one's own teacher, trusting what one does not fully comprehend, and getting through roadblocks (such as sloth and feelings of inadequacy) on the path to enlightened living. Each chapter contains anecdotes of the small ways in which yoga reaches into everyday people's everyday lives-and these stories elucidate the power of yoga in ways no theoretical teachings can. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060750466
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/4/2005
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 208,006
  • Product dimensions: 5.31 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.57 (d)

Meet the Author

Internationally renowned and bestselling author Donna Farhi moves yoga practice beyond the mat into our everyday lives, teaching us the tools to fight the weight of laziness, inaction, and misplaced attention, to rediscover the true values of our lives, and those parts of living that most deserve our attention and will reap the healthiest benefits. Moving away from trivial pursuits and petty grievances, we can find a connection to our inner divinity, creating a life where every moment is precious.

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Read an Excerpt

Bringing Yoga to Life

Chapter One We Begin Here

Monday night is the evening for beginners at the studio, and although it is only five-thirty the winter sky has begun to darken as students arrive, some tentatively, others in boisterous pairs who have egged each other on to come, and the silent furtive ones, not yet sure whether there is a special way to act when entering a Yoga school. Robin arrives a little late and searches nervously for the farthest corner, to hide behind the other attendees. "Why have you come?" I ask, and as we introduce ourselves Robin declares, with an edge of cynicism that I have grown to recognize as the thickening of skin over something far more tender, that she wants to lose a little weight, maybe learn to relax. "Seemed like a better option than ballroom dancing," she says smugly, raising a few eyebrows.

As the weeks go by, Robin begins to move forward in the room and to ask questions about the stiffness she feels in her back. "I don't know," she says offhandedly, "maybe it has something to do with my job. Some days I can hardly catch my breath." At the end of the first course Robin signs up for another, and months turn into years. A life is unveiled: an ambitious career, a marriage that didn't work out, a childhood much analyzed in therapy, and then an open question. How can this life become fresh again? How to peel away the veneer of self-defense and the sadness of disappointment? One summer Robin takes the leap and decides after much encouragement to attend a seven-day retreat. After a long and silent meditation one evening Robin comes to say good night, and we look into each other's eyes. Somethingineffable is exchanged: a recognition that something important has been realized. For once Robin drops her guard, and without saying a word I sense a warmth and tenderness that belie her practiced bravado. This is not where Robin began, yet it is a place that has always been there awaiting her arrival.

Over two decades of teaching I have witnessed again and again the power that Yoga has to shift seemingly intransigent negative patterns and to awaken the body, mind, and heart to other possibilities. No matter who we are or how long we have been entrenched in self-defeating behaviors, through daily Yoga practice we can become present to our own fundamental goodness and the goodness of others. Rediscovering who we really are at our core opens the way to experiencing our most basic level of connection with others. This connectedness lies at the heart of the practice called Yoga. Living in a unitive state is not an esoteric concept, and it is not an elusive higher realm that only very clever people can aspire to. It is the opening of the heart so that we have the capacity to feel tenderness, joy, and sorrow without shutting down. It is the opening of the mind to an awareness that encompasses rather than excludes. It is the startling and immediate recognition of our basic sameness. It is the practice of observing clearly, listening acutely, and skillfully responding to the moment with all the compassion we can muster. And it is a homecoming with and in the body for it is only here that we can do all these things.

Counter to the plethora of seven-step solutions and quick-fix formulas offered by so many contemporary self-help guides, the ancient science of Yoga does not pretend to besimple, quick, or easy. It is a practice that takes into account the very messy and often complex phenomenon of what we call a human being and the equally challenging task of everyday living. What Yoga does promise, however, is that through sincere, skillful, and consistent practice, anyone can become peaceful, happy, and free. It does not matter who you are or who you take yourself to be. Neither does it matter what has happened to you in the past or where you find yourself in the present. Anyone who has the intention to break through self-limiting and self-immobilizing thoughts and behaviors can and will find freedom through this practice. Regardless if you are a beginner or an experienced practitioner, the moment you engage in Yoga practice you will discover that the practice is itself the reward. Peace of mind and freedom from fear are as imminent as your focus. This change of mind has immediate consequences. You start to feel a sense of ease with life, and you feel more able to adapt to change. You experience a new vitality and clarity that affect your relationships at home, at work, and in the world.

That we may have come to see ourselves as separate and shut off from others is the central dilemma that we methodically dismantle in our Yoga practice because it is from this false sense of separation that we create so much of our own suffering and contribute to the suffering around us. We begin by putting aside a little time each day so that we can deliberately slow down and in doing so find a more natural rhythm that supports our well-being. This more relaxed rhythm allows us to reflect rather than react, to soften rather than harden, and to see clearly how things are now rather thandwellon the past or worry about the future. We achieve this in Yoga practice by simple means. Through the practice of postures we release pent-up tensions that have accumulated in our body, and we further refine our physical senses so that we become sensitive, adaptive, and resilient. Simultaneously, we reacquaint ourselves with the cyclic nature of our breath and its relationship to the sensate wisdom of our body. We learn to inhale completely and open to new experience ...

Bringing Yoga to Life. Copyright ? by Donna Farhi. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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First Chapter

Bringing Yoga to Life
The Everyday Practice of Enlightened Living

Chapter One

We Begin Here

Monday night is the evening for beginners at the studio, and although it is only five-thirty the winter sky has begun to darken as students arrive, some tentatively, others in boisterous pairs who have egged each other on to come, and the silent furtive ones, not yet sure whether there is a special way to act when entering a Yoga school. Robin arrives a little late and searches nervously for the farthest corner, to hide behind the other attendees. "Why have you come?" I ask, and as we introduce ourselves Robin declares, with an edge of cynicism that I have grown to recognize as the thickening of skin over something far more tender, that she wants to lose a little weight, maybe learn to relax. "Seemed like a better option than ballroom dancing," she says smugly, raising a few eyebrows.

As the weeks go by, Robin begins to move forward in the room and to ask questions about the stiffness she feels in her back. "I don't know," she says offhandedly, "maybe it has something to do with my job. Some days I can hardly catch my breath." At the end of the first course Robin signs up for another, and months turn into years. A life is unveiled: an ambitious career, a marriage that didn't work out, a childhood much analyzed in therapy, and then an open question. How can this life become fresh again? How to peel away the veneer of self-defense and the sadness of disappointment? One summer Robin takes the leap and decides after much encouragement to attend a seven-day retreat. After a long and silent meditation one evening Robin comes to say good night, and we look into each other's eyes. Something ineffable is exchanged: a recognition that something important has been realized. For once Robin drops her guard, and without saying a word I sense a warmth and tenderness that belie her practiced bravado. This is not where Robin began, yet it is a place that has always been there awaiting her arrival.

Over two decades of teaching I have witnessed again and again the power that Yoga has to shift seemingly intransigent negative patterns and to awaken the body, mind, and heart to other possibilities. No matter who we are or how long we have been entrenched in self-defeating behaviors, through daily Yoga practice we can become present to our own fundamental goodness and the goodness of others. Rediscovering who we really are at our core opens the way to experiencing our most basic level of connection with others. This connectedness lies at the heart of the practice called Yoga. Living in a unitive state is not an esoteric concept, and it is not an elusive higher realm that only very clever people can aspire to. It is the opening of the heart so that we have the capacity to feel tenderness, joy, and sorrow without shutting down. It is the opening of the mind to an awareness that encompasses rather than excludes. It is the startling and immediate recognition of our basic sameness. It is the practice of observing clearly, listening acutely, and skillfully responding to the moment with all the compassion we can muster. And it is a homecoming with and in the body for it is only here that we can do all these things.

Counter to the plethora of seven-step solutions and quick-fix formulas offered by so many contemporary self-help guides, the ancient science of Yoga does not pretend to be simple, quick, or easy. It is a practice that takes into account the very messy and often complex phenomenon of what we call a human being and the equally challenging task of everyday living. What Yoga does promise, however, is that through sincere, skillful, and consistent practice, anyone can become peaceful, happy, and free. It does not matter who you are or who you take yourself to be. Neither does it matter what has happened to you in the past or where you find yourself in the present. Anyone who has the intention to break through self-limiting and self-immobilizing thoughts and behaviors can and will find freedom through this practice. Regardless if you are a beginner or an experienced practitioner, the moment you engage in Yoga practice you will discover that the practice is itself the reward. Peace of mind and freedom from fear are as imminent as your focus. This change of mind has immediate consequences. You start to feel a sense of ease with life, and you feel more able to adapt to change. You experience a new vitality and clarity that affect your relationships at home, at work, and in the world.

That we may have come to see ourselves as separate and shut off from others is the central dilemma that we methodically dismantle in our Yoga practice because it is from this false sense of separation that we create so much of our own suffering and contribute to the suffering around us. We begin by putting aside a little time each day so that we can deliberately slow down and in doing so find a more natural rhythm that supports our well-being. This more relaxed rhythm allows us to reflect rather than react, to soften rather than harden, and to see clearly how things are now rather than dwell on the past or worry about the future. We achieve this in Yoga practice by simple means. Through the practice of postures we release pent-up tensions that have accumulated in our body, and we further refine our physical senses so that we become sensitive, adaptive, and resilient. Simultaneously, we reacquaint ourselves with the cyclic nature of our breath and its relationship to the sensate wisdom of our body. We learn to inhale completely and open to new experience ...

Bringing Yoga to Life
The Everyday Practice of Enlightened Living
. Copyright © by Donna Farhi. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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