Britain Before the Reform Act: Politics and Society, 1815-1832 / Edition 1

Britain Before the Reform Act: Politics and Society, 1815-1832 / Edition 1

by Eric J. Evans
     
 

ISBN-10: 0582002656

ISBN-13: 9780582002654

Pub. Date: 06/15/1995

Publisher: Pearson Education

In the years 1815-1832, Britain came close to revolution. Fewer than twenty years separate the Battle of Waterloo from the passing of the 'Great' Reform Act but during this period Britain's political elite was challenged as never before. In rising to that challenge, the political elite attempted, with considerable success, to ensure that Britain engineered that most

Overview

In the years 1815-1832, Britain came close to revolution. Fewer than twenty years separate the Battle of Waterloo from the passing of the 'Great' Reform Act but during this period Britain's political elite was challenged as never before. In rising to that challenge, the political elite attempted, with considerable success, to ensure that Britain engineered that most perilous of transitions, from a less complex and more deferential society into a modern urban and industrial one, while avoiding political revolution.

In this extensively revised 2nd edition, Evans engages with a welter of new material and fresh interpretations. The book sheds light both on the challenges to existing political and social authority and why those challenges were seen off.

Evans examines: The composition of Britain's political elite and how this elite coped with the problems thrown up by a society urbanising and modernising at an unprecedented rate, How Britain reacted to the longer-term implications of the French Revolution, including the development of a more cohesive national identity, How the elite attempted to maintain public order in this period - and with what success, The extent of change in Britain's political system brought about by political, religious and administrative reforms.

Written in an accessible style, with a rich collection of Documents, Chronology, Glossary, a Guide to Further Reading, and a 'Who's Who' which summarises the careers and contributions of the main figures, this new edition is essential for all those interested in understanding Britain at this most crucial turning point in its history.

About the Author:
Eric J. Evans is Emeritus Professor of History atLancaster University. He is the author of numerous titles of political and social history

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780582002654
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
06/15/1995
Series:
Seminar Studies in History
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.80(h) x 0.36(d)

Table of Contents


Preface     x
Acknowledgements     xii
Chronology     xiii
Who's Who     xxii
Glossary     xxxiv
Analysis     1
Introduction     3
1815 and All That     3
The Political Landscape     4
British Society in 1815     5
Britain in Crisis? 1815-20     10
Lord Liverpool, his Ministry and its Parliamentary Opponents     10
The Revival of Radical Politics, 1815-17     15
Peterloo and the Cato Street Conspiracy     22
The Curious Affair of Queen Caroline     29
The Achievement of Stability? 1821-7     34
The Return of Prosperity     34
'Liberal Toryism?' The Achievement of Lord Liverpool     38
Trade, Taxation and Finance     44
Law Reform     50
The Metropolitan Police     53
Trade Unions     55
Britain's Influence Abroad     57
Foreign Policy under Viscount Castlereagh     57
Foreign Policy under Canning     63
Stability Shattered 1827-32     69
The Break-up of the Tory Party, 1827-30     69
Religious Reforms, 1828-9     76
Economic Distress and Political Organization, 1829-30     81
The Return of the Whigs and the Reform Crisis, 1830-2     87
Conclusion     98
Putting Parliamentary Reform in Context     98
Assessing the Whig interpretation of 'Britain 1815-32'     99
Transition to a New Order?     100
Documents     105
Lord Liverpool Defends the Corn Law, 1815     106
A Petition against the Income Tax, 1816     106
George IV Considers Dismissing Lord Liverpool, 1820     107
Sir John Sinclair Defends the Agricultural Interest, 1822     107
A Statement from Buckinghamshire on the Agricultural Depression, 1822     108
The Earl of Thanet's Unsympathetic View of the Agricultural Depression, 1822     108
The Annual Register Celebrates Britain's Commercial Advance, 1824     109
William Huskisson Explains the Value of Tariff Reductions     109
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine Attacks Free Trade Ideas, 1830     110
George Canning Expresses his Reservations about the Congress System, 1818     111
The Castlereagh State Paper of May 1820     111
The Annual Register Identifies the Benefits of Close Relations with South America, 1825     112
Canning Briefs the Consul-General of Buenos Aires, 1823      112
Canning's Reasons for Intervention in Portugal, 1826     113
Tory Uncertainties After the Departure of Lord Liverpool, 1827     113
Samuel Bamford on the Influence of William Cobbett in 1816     114
Cobbett's Address to the Journeymen and Labourers, 1816     115
An Attack on Cobbett, 1817     116
Advertising the Spa Fields Meeting of December 1816     117
A Call to Arms in 1816     118
The Report of the Committee of Secrecy, February 1817     118
A Radical Attack on Levels of Taxation, 1819     119
Radical Freethought in the 1820s     119
The Repeal of the Test and Corporation Acts Attacked, 1828     120
Sir Robert Peel Concedes Roman Catholic Emancipation, 1829     120
Perspectives on the Fight for Norwich during the 1830 General Election     121
Wellington Misjudges the Public Mood, 1830     123
A Hostile View of Political Unions, 1831     124
Earl Grey Uses the Middle Classes to Press his Case for Parliamentary Reform, 1831     125
Sir Robert Inglis and T.B. Macaulay Debate the Reform Question, 1831     125
An Immediate Response to the Presentation of the Government's Reform Bill, 1831     126
An Appraisal of Macaulay's Debating Style, 1831      127
The Political Influence of the Established Church, 1831     128
An Attack on Established Authority without Contemporary Understanding, 1832     128
The Days of May and the Likely Return of Wellington as Prime Minister, 1832     129
John Wilson Croker Encounters Manchester Working Men, 1832     129
The Duke of Wellington Considers the Likely Consequences of Reform, 1832     130
Further Reading     132
References     143
Index     149

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >