Britishness: Perspectives on the British Question

Overview

Distinguished contributors from a range of disciplines explore the question of Britishness – past, present and future.

  • A lively and authoritative discussion of an important, timely and contemporary issue
  • Investigates how devolution has brought a new focus on the future of Britain and the nature of Britishness
  • Discusses the challenge of a ...
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Overview

Distinguished contributors from a range of disciplines explore the question of Britishness – past, present and future.

  • A lively and authoritative discussion of an important, timely and contemporary issue
  • Investigates how devolution has brought a new focus on the future of Britain and the nature of Britishness
  • Discusses the challenge of a more diverse society, with the search for a basis of social cohesion and solidarity
  • Examines Gordon Brown's Britishness project, with its aim of producing a statement of British values
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781405192699
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 11/3/2009
  • Series: Political Quarterly Monograph Series , #1
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 182
  • Product dimensions: 9.61 (w) x 6.69 (h) x 0.39 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew Gamble is Professor of Politics at the University of Sheffield. He is joint editor of The Political Quarterly and his books include Between Europe and America: The Future of British Politics (2003) and Politics and Fate (2000).

Tony Wright is MP for Cannock Chase and Chairman of the Public Administration Committee in the House of Commons. He is joint editor of The Political Quarterly and his books include The British Political Process (1999) and Socialisms: Old and New (1996).

Andrew Gamble and Tony Wright have also co-edited The New Social Democracy (1999) and Restating The State? (2004).

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Table of Contents

Introduction: The Britishness Question: Andrew Gamble and Tony Wright

1. ‘Bursting with Skeletons’: Britishness after Empire: David Marquand

2. Does Britishness Still Matter in the Twenty-First Century - and How Much and How Well Do the Politicians Care?: Linda Colley

3. Being British: Bhikhu Parekh

4. Britishness: a Role for the State?: Varun Uberoi and Iain McLean

5. England and Britain, Europe and the Anglosphere: David Willetts

6. What Britishness means to the British: Peter Kellner

7. The BBC and Metabolising Britishness. Critical Patriotism:   Jean Seaton

8. Don’t Mess with the Missionary Man: Brown, Moral Compasses and the Road to Britishness: Gerry Hassan

9. Britishness and the Future of the Union: Robert Hazell

10. Devolution, Britishness and the Future of the Union: Charlie Jeffery

11. Englishness in Contemporary British Politics: Richard English, Richard Hayton and Michael Kenny

12. The Wager of Devolution and the Challenge to Britishness: Arthur Aughey

13. Do We Really Need Britannia?: Bernard Crick

14. Churchill’s Dover Speech (1946): Peter Hennessy

Index

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