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Bro-Jitsu: The Martial Art of Sibling Smackdown
     

Bro-Jitsu: The Martial Art of Sibling Smackdown

by Daniel H. Wilson, Les McClaine (Illustrator)
 
Bro-jitsu is a highly stylized form of physical and mental combat that has been practiced and honed to perfection over countless millennia by billions of human beings who all have one crucial thing in common: annoying siblings. The book breaks down Bro-jitsu into three strategies: offensive moves, defensive moves, and psychological manipulation. Each section

Overview

Bro-jitsu is a highly stylized form of physical and mental combat that has been practiced and honed to perfection over countless millennia by billions of human beings who all have one crucial thing in common: annoying siblings. The book breaks down Bro-jitsu into three strategies: offensive moves, defensive moves, and psychological manipulation. Each section delivers step-by-step instructions on performing crucial techniques, from the classic Wet Willy to the inventive Full-Body Defensive Fish Wiggle. No sibling should be without it!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This small-format, tongue-in-cheek guide provides 126 martial art techniques for siblings to gain the upper-hand and drive their brothers and sisters crazy. While the Bro-Jitsu vow prohibits face hits or permanent scarring, basic offensive moves from punching (“This old-fashioned favorite never goes out of style”) to advanced maneuvers like “Stealth Butt Kick” and “Hanging Spit Fake” are readily encouraged and illustrated. Goading methods include parroting a sibling in an obnoxious voice, and “Stop Hitting Yourself” claims #1 in the list of “Top Ten Bro-Jitsu Moves.” Wilson’s matter-of-fact tone should have kids in stitches—the content less so, one hopes—and should resonate with anyone who’s ever hawked a loogie at an unsuspecting brother or sister. Ages 12-up. (Apr.)
School Library Journal
Gr 6–9—It may be a universal constant that siblings find ways to torment one another, and Wilson offers techniques for honing the rivalry to an art. From traditional moves such as "two for flinching" noogies, and pinching or tripping to more sophisticated techniques, like making "chocolate milk" from dog poo and inflicting other gross-outs on unsuspecting sibs, Wilson has all the moves covered. Unfortunately, while his humor is usually in the right place, many of his techniques could be truly dangerous: the "seat belt sling" advises swinging the buckle like a mace, and while a caution is offered ("Don't sling the belt unless you are ready to chip your brother's tooth and go live with Grandma for a few weeks"), readers may not take it seriously. Other techniques involve sitting on younger or smaller siblings to subdue them, or causing humiliation in front of their friends, which could lead to actual physical or psychological harm in the long run. Overall, the hurtful spirit of much of the book and the real potential for damage in some "techniques" make it hard to find an audience that is both young enough to appreciate the humor but old enough to know where to draw the line. School libraries in particular will want to stick with Wilson's How to Survive a Robot Uprising (2005).—Alana Joli Abbott, James Blackstone Memorial Library, Branford, CT

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781599902791
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
04/13/2010
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
4.54(w) x 7.00(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Daniel Wilson is a master of Bro-Jitsu, having been an older brother since the age of two. He is also a robotics engineer who earned his Ph.D. in robotics at Carnegie Mellon University. Daniel is the author of How to Survive a Robot Uprising, Where's My Jetpack?, and How to Build a Robot Army. He lives in Portland, Oregon, and blogs regularly at www.danielhwilson.com.

Les McClaine is a freelance cartoonist whose work includes The Middleman (Viper Comics) and the digital comic Johnny Crossbones, which was nominated for the 2005 Eisner Award for Best Digital Comic. His Bro-Jitsu skills were honed from earliest childhood on his older sister. You can visit him online at www.evilspacerobot.com

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