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Broken Flower (Early Spring Series #1) [NOOK Book]

Overview

SHE WAS TOO GROWN-UP FOR CHILDISH GAMES.
BUT TOO YOUNG TO BECOME A WOMAN. . . .


Living with her parents and brother, Ian, in her Grandmother Emma's enormous mansion, Jordan March tries to be a good girl and follow her grandmother's strict rules. It's easy for Jordan to hide in the shadows -- between Ian's brilliant, all-consuming talents for science and the ever-more-frequent arguments among the grown-ups. ...
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Broken Flower (Early Spring Series #1)

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Overview

SHE WAS TOO GROWN-UP FOR CHILDISH GAMES.
BUT TOO YOUNG TO BECOME A WOMAN. . . .


Living with her parents and brother, Ian, in her Grandmother Emma's enormous mansion, Jordan March tries to be a good girl and follow her grandmother's strict rules. It's easy for Jordan to hide in the shadows -- between Ian's brilliant, all-consuming talents for science and the ever-more-frequent arguments among the grown-ups. But one day, without warning, Jordan's body begins to change -- and everyone notices her in a way that seems dark, dangerous, and threatening. Suddenly the March family secrets are unleashed, and Jordan is ashamed and afraid that her soft curves are unwelcome indeed. Shipped off to a lakeside hideaway, Jordan and Ian befriend a girl whose shocking revelations make for a summer of scandal and explosive emotion. Outraged, Grandmother Emma sets out to make Jordan pay for her family's past mistakes, sending her world spinning wildly out of control. . . .
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743298414
  • Publisher: Pocket Books
  • Publication date: 10/1/2006
  • Series: Early Spring Series , #1
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 448
  • Sales rank: 217,336
  • File size: 418 KB

Meet the Author

V. C. Andrews
V.C. Andrews® has been a bestselling phenomenon since the publication of Flowers in the Attic, which was followed by four more Dollanganger family novels: Petals on the Wind, If There Be Thorns, Seeds of Yesterday, and Garden of Shadows. Since then, readers have been captivated by more than seventy novels in V.C. Andrews’s bestselling series, which have sold more than 106 million copies and have been translated into more than twenty-five foreign languages.

Biography

"The face of fear I display in my novels is not the pale specter from the sunken grave, nor is it the thing that goes bump in the night," V. C. Andrews once told Douglas E. Winter. "Mine are the deep-seated fears established when we are children, and they never quite go away: the fear of being helpless, the fear of being trapped, the fear of being out of control."

Andrews's novel Flowers in the Attic launched the popular genre sometimes dubbed "children in jeopardy" -- stories about young people abused, lied to, and preyed upon by their evil guardians. The author's own childhood was not nearly so lurid, though it did have an element of tragedy: As a teenager she had a bad fall, which resulted in the development of bone spurs. A botched surgery, combined with arthritis, forced her to use a wheelchair or crutches for the rest of her life.

Andrews lived with her mother and worked as a commercial artist until the 1970s, when she began to write in earnest. Most of her early stories and novels went unpublished (one exception was "I Slept with My Uncle on My Wedding Night," which appeared in a pulp confession magazine). Finally, in 1979, Flowers in the Attic made it into print. The book soared to No. 1 on the New York Times bestseller list and was followed by two equally successful sequels, Petals on the Wind and If There Be Thorns. Critics weren't always kind -- a Washington Post reviewer wrote that Flowers in the Attic "may well be the worst book I have ever read" -- but that didn't matter to millions of Andrews's readers, who devoured her gruesome fairy tales as fast as she could pen them.

As E. D. Huntley points out in V. C. Andrews: A Critical Companion, Andrews's novels fit neatly into the "female Gothic" tradition, in which an innocent young woman is trapped in an isolated mansion and persecuted by a villain. Andrews's own contribution was to take some of the themes implicit in early Gothic novels -- incest, sexual jealousy, and obsession -- and make them sensationally explicit in her works.

As most of her fans know by now, V. C. Andrews died in 1986, but new V. C. Andrews books keep popping up on the bestseller lists. That's because the Andrews estate hired a ghost writer, Andrew Neiderman, to continue writing books in the late author's style. Andrews's heirs have been cagey about just how much unfinished work she left behind when she died, but testimony during a 1993 tax case suggested that Andrews had only completed a portion of Garden of Shadows, the eighth book (out of more than 50) published under her name.

Still, even if the vast majority of "V. C. Andrews" books weren't actually written by V. C. Andrews, many of her fans are happy to have her tradition carried on. Neiderman has drawn on Andrews's novels, notebooks, and drawings for inspiration. "Don't make this sound weird," he once said in a Washington Post interview, "but sometimes I do feel possessed." To the original V. C. Andrews, who believed in precognition and reincarnation, it probably wouldn't sound weird at all.

Good To Know

Andrews wrote nine novels before Flowers in the Attic, including a science fantasy titled The Gods of the Green Mountain. Later, when she was a bestselling novelist, she wanted to try her hand at different kinds of fiction, but her publisher discouraged her. "I am supposed to stay in this niche, whatever it is, because there is so much money in it," she told Douglas Winter. "I mean, I have tapped a gold mine and they don't want to let go of it. I don't like that, because I want to branch out."

Though V. C. Andrews went by the name Virginia, her birth name was Cleo Virginia Andrews, not Virginia Cleo Andrews. She had planned to publish her books under the name Virginia Andrews, but her first publisher printed Flowers in the Atticas the work of "V. C. Andrews" in hopes that the gender-neutral name would make the book appealing to male readers.

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      Cleo Virginia Andrews
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 6, 1923
    2. Place of Birth:
      Portsmouth, Virginia
    1. Date of Death:
      December 19, 1986
    2. Place of Death:
      Virginia Beach, Virginia

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 33 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(16)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Second verse, same as the first for Andrews fans

    I have been reading V.C Andrews for over 20 years. In fact, my first "adult" book I picked out when I was 11 years old was V.C Andrews' book Heaven, the first in the Casteel series. So, needless to say, my expectations were high, and my hopes were even higher.

    Jordan March is your typical 6 year old girl, except she lives in a very large and beautiful mansion that is lorded over by her grandmother. Her mother, father, and brother, Ian, also live there along with her. Suddenly, Jordan's life turns upside down when at that young age she gets her first menstrual cycle. Her mother, in fear that her grandmother will think she is a freak, hides it from her while her father buries his head in a hole pretending it didn't happen. Her grandmother, however, soon finds out and takes over her medical treatment to help stunt the hormonal imbalance.

    Shortly into the book, Jordan's mother finds out that her father has been having an affair with a woman and she calls for a divorce. Her grandmother, not having that in the slightest, goes to talk with her mother and she agrees after several veiled threats to end the divorce proceedings. During that time where her parents were supposedly patching things up, they are in a terrible car accident on their way home, finding out Jordan's brother, Ian, was molesting her.

    No it doesn't get any happier.

    After her parents are both taken to the hospital, her father paralyzed, her mother in a coma brain damaged, Jordan and Ian are sent back to the mansion with a nanny, who is a terrible and nasty woman further damaging poor Jordan in nightmarish ways that are reminiscent to old nun horror stories.

    It still doesn't get any happier.

    Ian, who I figured out to be a total sociopath, throws a hissy fit and poisons the nanny with strychnine while she sleeps therefore getting sent away to a home for the juvenile criminally insane.

    That's about all I can say story wise without giving away where this book in the series ends. However, I'd like to add a few things before you think about reading this book; this book deals with child sexuality both with Jordan going through puberty and being molested by two different people, like with all of the V.C Andrews books there is no happy ending and probably never will be, and it's written by a ghost writer since the woman died, well, years ago.

    I have read some critics getting in a tizzy over the child sexuality thing but a point to make here again is that all of her books have dealt with this before in some way or another. Maybe not so blatantly or so young, but it's been there. So, if you are a little faint of heart about this subject matter I don't recommend this author at all. Flowers in the Attic was a good example of this. Heads up, in the end of that particular series, Cathy marries her brother Chris and has children with him so I don't exactly see what the fuss is about here. If you can stomach that, you can stomach this.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2007

    Pure trash

    I am a V.C. Andrews lover! I have read 4 of her complete sets, and i got the new 'Broken Flower' and it is nothing but trash. A young girl, 6 yrs old, is being touched and molested by a 16 year old girl, and her brother touches and feels on her who is 13. I have read many of her books, but this does drawn a line at child pron! AWFUL! It should not be sold.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2012

    Least favorite

    I'v read almost all V.C. Andrews books and this is my least favorite. It was too disturbing because the child was too young and it turned my stomach because of the inproper content.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2012

    Slow & kinda boring

    I have read many of VCAs early books & loved them but i did not really enjoy this one. Not very exciting. The ghost writer is not doing a very good job anymore.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2008

    It was okay

    This book moved a little slow, and I had a hard time getting into the story at times. It could've been because I had just finished the Dollangager series, which was superb. However the story had its interesting points, althought the plot wasn't clear throughout the book and the end seemed to leave a lot of unanswered questions that made you wonder if the first half of the book could have been cut out. I would consider reading the sequal, Scattered Leaves.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2013

    Raventail

    Grabed Dragonpaw and gracepaw "Thats everyone"

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2013

    Braveaw

    Slumps to the groound with her eyes closed

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2013

    Tigerpaw

    ((Sorry i had a lock in, no sleep at all lasr night))

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2013

    P
    I
    E

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2013

    Ella

    Walked in hey swift hey guys do want a ride on my shoulder i dont hurt u swear

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2013

    Jaggedfang

    "Is everyone alright?" He asked, his eyes sliding onto Smokeykit.<br>

    <p>^Jagged^

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2013

    Swiftpaw

    Swiftpaw yawned boredly, Stretching out. Beside him an unknown tabby tom, whos fur was dark brown. <br>
    ^_Swift•^ and *+Dust+*

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2013

    TO ALL

    ELLA IS A NICE TWOLEG!!! DONT HURT HER!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2013

    Dapplekiit

    Hiyall

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2013

    Nectarpaw - To: Swiftpaw

    Pebblepaw is locked out, her den is in result twelve.

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  • Posted September 13, 2011

    Worth it

    I have read and own MANY of this author's books. Even though they all have the same plot and characters, I'm always drawn to them as the story is always compelling in a way. This one started a bit slow but I did get into it around the middle and really enjoyed it overall, although not one of the best.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2011

    Good

    Its good for adults and some children. I a child my self bud did not like it as much as her other books. This book realy did suprise my. From books I've read it doesn't fit vc very much but still I did enjoy it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2011

    Bad writing and wrong.

    This book was nothing that I expected - in not a good way. Like most of VC Andrews other books, I expected the girl to be an adult rather soon or at least a teenager... but no. instead it dealt with a 7 yr olds sexuality in a rather grotesque way. As someone who was sexually abused as a child, this book was very disturbing in the way it was written. Ive read many VC andrews books/series and have always loved them, but this one... was just wrong.

    Even dispite the uncomfortable topic, it was a slow moving and dull story. I ended up not reading more than halfway, and wouldn't have even read that far but I dont like to stop reading after starting a book... but this one... just couldn't read more. Kept hoping the girl would get much older but no.

    Not a book I would suggest to anyone. Badly written.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Bloody good

    Seven years old Jordan March and her thirteen years old brother Ian are being raised by a loving nurturing mother, Carol, and Christopher, a useless cheating father whose only love is alcohol. Carol is always there for her offspring while Christopher has nothing to do with either of them. When Carol notices Jordan has tiny breasts and pubic hairs, she panics and tells her daughter not to say a word to anyone and to never let Grandma Emma see her naked. Carol also checks her daughter¿s dirty laundry only to find evidence that the little girl menstruated. Brilliant science minded Ian is fascinated by it and decides he must study what is happening to his sister.----------------- Due to his drinking and driving Carol and Christopher are severely injured in a car accident that leaves both incapable of caring for themselves let alone two children. Grandma Emma who detests her son takes over caring for her two grandchildren though much of the daily chores are left to the hired help, strict disciplinarian Miss Harper. Emma does not hide the fact that she cherishes Jordan, but seems at best to be indifferent to Ian, perhaps loathing him whereas Miss Harper thinks the seemingly sweet girl hides an evil soul. This is the summer that will make or break young Jordan especially after she and Ian meet Flora, who reveals secrets involving the March brood.----------------- As always with any of the ¿Flower¿ novels, the villain is never quite who you think he or she is. The story line focuses on Jordan whom readers will empathize with while also feeling horrified that a second grader is beginning to turn into a woman. Fans hope she comes out of this okay as it seems those who should love and nurture her want to use her. Even though the author died, fans of the series will appreciate a fine entry that easily could have been written by V.C. Andrews¿ ghost.------------- Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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