Broken Prey (Lucas Davenport Series #16)

( 99 )

Overview

The first body is of a young woman, found on a Minneapolis riverbank, her throat cut, her body scourged and put on display. Whoever did this, Lucas Davenport knows, is pushed by brain chemistry. There is something wrong with him. This isn?t a bad love affair.

The second body is found three weeks later, in a farmhouse six miles south. Same condition, same display?except this time it is a man. Nothing to link the two victims, nothing to indicate that the killings end here.

?This ...

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Broken Prey (Lucas Davenport Series #16)

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Overview

The first body is of a young woman, found on a Minneapolis riverbank, her throat cut, her body scourged and put on display. Whoever did this, Lucas Davenport knows, is pushed by brain chemistry. There is something wrong with him. This isn’t a bad love affair.

The second body is found three weeks later, in a farmhouse six miles south. Same condition, same display—except this time it is a man. Nothing to link the two victims, nothing to indicate that the killings end here.

“This guy…” Lucas said. He took a deep breath, let it out as a sigh. “This guy is going to bust our chops.” 

And soon he is going to do far, far worse than that…

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
For years, a trio of vicious serial murderers has been locked behind bars in Minnesota Security Hospital. But a new killer is on the loose, and his bloody handiwork manifests disturbing similarities to the techniques of the "Big Three." Are these monsters outsourcing terror? Only Lucas Davenport can face down this living nightmare.
Publishers Weekly
Sandford sends series hero Lucas Davenport's family off to London to ensure that domestic concerns never slow the action in this sexy, bloody thriller. Davenport, a Minnesota State Bureau of Criminal Apprehension investigator, had lately been doing political fix-it jobs for the governor, but this time he's got a psychopathic serial killer on his hands. ("All major metro areas had them, sometimes two and three at a time. The public had the impression that they were rare. They weren't.") The first victim, a young woman, was "scourged" with a wire whip; number two, a young man, had his penis cut off. Evidence first points to recently released sex offender Charlie Pope. Though Charlie is pretty dumb and the killer is extremely smart, it takes Davenport and his series partner, Detective Sloan, a while to realize they're chasing the wrong guy. Sandford introduces some lighter moments, the most entertaining about Davenport's new iPod and his quest to compile a list of the 100 best rock songs ever recorded, which every cop on the force gives him suggestions for. These moments allow readers to catch their breath amid the otherwise nonstop tension as the killer taunts the authorities while snaring more victims, and the cops race around the countryside always just a few minutes too late. For those who thought Davenport (and Sandford) were slowing down and showing signs of age and prosperity, this superlative entry will dispel all such notions. This is tough, unstoppable, white-knuckle fiction. Agent, Esther Newberg. 500,000 first printing; main selections of the Literary Guild, Doubleday Book Club, Mystery Guild and BOMC. (May) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Lucas Davenport is back, and, yes, this is billed as his scariest adventure yet. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Now that Lucas Davenport's gone up against a Russian spy ring (Hidden Prey, 2004), it's almost anticlimactic to ask him to catch a mere serial killer. But that's the only anticlimax here. What are the odds that the M.O. behind Angela Larson's murder-she was bound, scourged with a wire whip, and repeatedly raped before her throat was cut and her body laid out in a ritualistic display-would be repeated with a male victim? But Adam Rice, an old acquaintance of Blue Earth County sheriff Gene Nordwall's, presents the same grisly picture. Was their killer gay or bisexual? How did he find his victims? And what do they have in common? Lucas, who runs the Office of Regional Research for the Minnesota's Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, is all over the case, amassing evidence against Charlie Pope, a sex offender just released from St. John's Security Hospital with a few months to run on his sentence but his attitude still intact. Charlie has celebrated his freedom by sawing off his ankle monitor and vanishing-except for the trace evidence he's left at the crime scenes and the phone calls he makes, first to ambitious Star-Tribune reporter Ruffe Ignace, then to Lucas himself. The only trouble is that Charlie's clearly not smart enough to be the murderer. He must be getting help from somebody-maybe from one of the habitual Big Three offenders he spent time with at St. John's. Wondering whether anybody not named Hannibal Lecter can be issuing murderous instructions from inside a prison, Lucas and Co. hunker down to take a long hard look at the hospital just as things start to get really interesting. A tale so fast-moving you won't even notice the unobtrusively expert detective work till the second timearound. First printing of 500,000; Book-of-the-Month Club main selection; Literary Guild main selection; author tour
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780425204306
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/2/2006
  • Series: Lucas Davenport Series , #16
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 496
  • Sales rank: 115,422
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 4.58 (h) x 1.19 (d)

Meet the Author

John Sandford is the author of twenty-two Prey novels, most recently Stolen Prey; the Virgil Flowers novels, most recently Shock Wave; and six other books. He lives in Minnesota.

Biography

John Camp (better known to readers as thrillmeister John Sandford) began his career as a journalist -- first as a crime reporter for The Miami Herald, then as a general reporter, columnist, and features writer for the Saint Paul Pioneer Press & Dispatch. In 1986, he won the Pulitzer Prize for "Life on the Land: An American Farm Family," a five-part series examining the farm crisis in southwest Minnesota.

Camp's interests turned to fiction in the mid-1980s, and he took time off to write two novels which were ultimately accepted for publication: The Fool's Run, a techno-thriller featuring a complex con man known as Kidd, and Rules of Prey, a police procedural starring maverick Minneapolis detective Lucas Davenport. When both books were scheduled (by different publishers) to be released three months apart in 1989, Camp was persuaded to adopt a pseudonym for one. He chose his paternal grandmother's maiden name, "Sandford" for Rules of Prey, and the nom de plume has remained attached to all the books in the series.

Less Dick Tracy than Dirty Harry, hard-boiled, iconoclastic Lucas Davenport is a composite of the cops Camp met while working the crime beat as a reporter. Intelligent and street smart, Davenport is also manipulative and not above bending the rules to get results. And although he has mellowed over time (something of a skirt chaser in his youth, he is now married with children), he remains one of the edgiest and most popular protagonists in detective fiction. Fans keep returning to the Prey books for their intelligently hatched plots, high-octane pacing, and deft, fully human characterizations.

From time to time, Camp strays from his bestselling series for standalone thrillers (The Night Crew, Dead Watch), and in 2007 he introduced a new series hero, Virgil Flowers of the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, who debuted in Dark of the Moon. Although he is no longer a full-time journalist, Camp contributes occasional articles and book reviews to various publications. He is also a passionate archaeologist and has worked at a number of digs, mainly in Israel.

Good To Know

Don't confuse John Sandford with John Sanford -- it's one of Sandford's pet peeves. Sanford (without the "d") is a Christian philosophy writer.

The Sandford pseudonym has caused a few problems for Camp in the past. At an airport once, his ticket was reserved under Sandford, while all of his identification, of course, had the name Camp. Luckily, he had one of his novels with him, and thanks to the book jacket photo, he was able to convince airport security to let him on the plane.

The books in Camp's less successful Kidd series (The Fool's Run, The Empress File, The Devil's Code, and The Hanged Man's Song) have been re-released under the Sandford pseudonym.

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    1. Also Known As:
      John Roswell Camp
    2. Hometown:
      St. Paul, Minnesota
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 23, 1944
    2. Place of Birth:
      Cedar Rapids, Iowa
    1. Education:
      State University of Iowa, Iowa City: B.A., American History; M.A., Journalism
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

1

CHARLIE POPE TRUDGED down the alley with the empty garbage can on his back, soaked in the stench of rancid meat and rotten bananas and curdled blood and God knew what else, a man whose life had collapsed into a trash pit—and still he could feel the eyes falling on him.

The secret glances and veiled gazes spattered him like sleet from a winter thunderstorm. Everyone in town knew Charlie Pope, and they all watched him.

He’d been on the front page of the newspaper a half dozen times, his worried pig-eyed face peering out from the drop boxes and the shelves of the supermarkets. They got him when he registered as a sex offender, they got him outside his trailer, they got him carrying his can.

Pervert Among Us, the papers said, Sex Maniac Stalks Our Daughters, How Long Will He Contain Himself Before Something Goes Terribly Wrong? Well—they didn’t really say that, but that’s exactly what they meant.

Charlie tossed the empty garbage can to the side, stooped over the next one, lifted, staggered, and headed for the street. Heavy motherfucker. What’d they put in there, fuckin’ typewriters? How can they expect a white man to keep up with these fuckin’ Mexicans?

All the other garbagemen were Mexicans, small guys from some obscure village down in the mountains. They worked incessantly, chattering in Spanish to isolate him, curling their lips at the American pervert who was made to work among them.

CHARLIE WAS A LARGE MAN, more fat than muscle, with a football-shaped head, sloping shoulders, and short, thick legs. He was bald, but his ears were hairy; he had a diminutive chin, tiny lips, and deep-set, dime-sized eyes that glistened with fluid. Noticeable and not attractive. He looked like a maniac, a newspaper columnist said.

He was a maniac. The electronic bracelet on his ankle testified to the fact. The cops had busted him and put him away for rape and aggravated assault, and suspected him in three other assaults and two murders. He’d done them, all right, and had gotten away with it, all but the one rape and ag assault. For that, they’d sent him to the hospital for eight years.

Hospital. The thought made his lips crook up in a cynical smile.

St. John’s was to hospitals what a meat hook was to a hog.

CHARLIE PUSHED BACK the thought of St. John’s and wiped the sweat out of his eyebrows, wrestled the garbage cans out to the truck, lifting, throwing, then dragging and sometimes kicking the cans back to the customers’ doors. He could smell himself in the sunshine: he smelled like sweat and spoiled cheese and rotten pork, like sour milk and curdled fat, like life gone bad.

He’d thought he’d get used to it, but he never had. He smelled garbage every morning when he got to work, smelled it on himself all day, smelled it in his sweat, smelled it on his pillow in that hot, miserable trailer.

Hot and miserable, but better than St. John’s.

EARLY MORNING.

Charlie was across the park from the famous Sullivan Bank when the chick in the raspberry-colored pants went by. The last straw? The straw that broke the camel’s back?

Her brown eyes struck Charlie as cold raindrops, then flicked away when he turned at the impact; he was left with the impression of soft brown eyebrows, fine skin, and raspberry lipstick.

She had a heart-shaped ass.

She was wearing a cream-colored silk blouse, hip-clinging slacks, and low heels that lengthened her legs and tightened her ass at the same. She walked with that long busy confident stride seen on young businesswomen, full of themselves and still strangers to hard decision and failure.

And honest to God, her ass was heart shaped. Charlie felt a catch of desire in his throat.

Her hips twitched sideways with each of her steps: like two bobcats fighting in a gunny sack, somebody had once said, one of the other perverts at St. John’s, trying to be funny. But it wasn’t like that at all. It was a soft move, it was the motion of the world, right there in the raspberry slacks, with the slender back tapering down to her waist, her heels clicking on the sidewalk, her shoulder-length hair swinging in a backbeat to the rhythm of her legs.

Jesus God, he needed one. He’d been eight and a half years without real sex.

Charlie’s tongue flicked out like a lizard’s as he looked after her, and he could taste the garbage on his lips, could feel—even if they weren’t there at this minute, he could feel them—the flies buzzing around his head.

Charlie Pope, thirty-four, a maniac, smelling like old banana peels and spoiled coffee grounds, standing on the street in Owatonna, passing eyes like icy raindrops, looking at a girl with a heart-shaped ass in raspberry slacks, and telling himself,

“I gotta get me some of that. I just gotta...”

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 99 )
Rating Distribution

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(51)

4 Star

(33)

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(7)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 99 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    John Sandford writes the best police procedurals on the market today

    The first body that of Angela Larson was found in a posed position, her body scourged, her neck sliced open, and ligature marks on her hands. The second corpse Adam Rice is found in the same manner with his young son killed as an afterthought. Lucas Davenport, who was at both crime scenes, concludes that the same person did the killings. When the news leaks to the media, parole officer Mark Fox Calls Davenport and tells him he thinks his parolee Charlie Pope, who was just released from St. John¿s mental institution for raping and strangling a woman was the perpetrator....................... Charlie is nowhere to be found. His trailer is deserted, he failed to show up for his job and the electronic surveillance bracelet he was forced to wear was cut open. He gets in contact with newspaper reporter Russell Ignace of the Star Tribune and tells him that he has a third victim that he will kill next. When Lucas learns of this, he leads a massive search to find the perpetrator but he is too late. Now Lucas really is determined to do whatever it takes to find and cage the killer...................... John Sandford writes the best police procedurals on the market today. The killer is playing a diabolical game, constantly shifting the evidence so it falls on the wrong person and Lucas doesn¿t catch on to the scheme until three innocent lives are lost. Even when he figured out what is happening, there is so many viable suspects that he and the readers will find it near impossible to identify of the killer. This who-done-it is one of the best Lucas Davenport tales in this long running series.................... Harriet Klausner

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2014

    Loved it!!

    Sandford wrote another winner. The hero's are always believable and the villains are always nasty.
    Loved it.

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  • Posted August 31, 2013

    Great Lucas Davenport adventure!

    You see, I love Lucas Davenport, and John Sandford's development of this character over time has given the Davenport Books a richness not often found in plain old mystery novels. And the plot is great - lots of twists and turns and OMG! moments. Great read. And he doesn't short you for pages as do some authors.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2013

    Broken Prey

    Great read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2012

    I'm making my way thru ...

    I'm making my way thru the J.S. "Prey Series" from start-to-finish & this is my favorite of the 16 I have read to-date. It's such a well-crafted story, told in a breathtaking way. There's not a single wasted word in this showcase of his writing style. I know this borders on cliche, but I literally couldn't put it down.

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  • Posted February 29, 2012

    Loved it!

    I found the beginning of this book a little disconcerting as it chopped and changed a fair bit. However, once I got into the story, I was hooked. The author maintains a good level of suspense throughout and the plot has more twists and turns than you would find in a maze. Interestingly, I was completely unable to pick the culprit until the author was ready for me to do so, which is fairly rare these days. If you like murder mysteries, you will love this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2010

    John Sanford

    I decided to give this author a go when I read a reference about him in another book I was reading. I was enjoying that one, so I decided to try this author. I very much enjoyed reading my first book by him, and I hope to purchase others to read. A good story, human, realistic and believable.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2010

    Great as always

    I love the Davenport series....Never a dull moment.

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  • Posted September 19, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Broken Prey, John Sandford

    Everything that John Sandford has written is riveting, thrilling and edge-of-your-seat, have to keep reading terrific. Broken Prey is no exception. For those of you who may not have had the pleasure of reading John Sandford, I recommend that you buy any of his 'Prey' books and prepare yourself for a good read.

    In "Broken Prey", Lucas Davenport, seasoned investigator for the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension in Minnesota, is brought into a series of particularly heinous crimes where the body is put on display and left in a place that would be easily and quickly discovered. It goes on from there with the mystery stacking one on top of the other with Lucas one step behind the next murder. This is a definite read for those of us that love a good mystery/thriller.

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  • Posted August 31, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Caught My Attention

    I have not read or listened to any of John Sanford's writings, until Broken Prey. I was drawn from the beginning. Captured and kept captive to see what turn or trick was next. The Charater Davenport is just the kind of agent you would imagine more of the special crime agent would be like. I am only sorry that I started with a book towards the newest. I am loooking for the first 15 in the series to start from the beginning. I love them on CD so I can listen from my laptop or while in my car driving.

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  • Posted April 20, 2009

    Another great saga in the series.

    Good, solid character development and a great plot.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2008

    Greatness

    I almost thought I was reading a different author. This book is fantastic. It actually has a few twists which in his past books were pretty rare. They were so straight ahead and too easy to figure out. This one however makes you think just a bit and its a hell of a story. I hope Sandford stays this way. He was very creative and his characters were fantastic. I loved when you read a book and you dont want to put it down and this was definitely one of them

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2006

    The beginning of the end

    I found this to be a tremendous work. The running tally of the greatest songs is great. The plot is just far fetched enough to be interesting without being completely insane. However, I fear the history of the best recurring in recent memory is about to come to an end. Given the financial situation of Lucas (which has been a great asset throughout)I do not see how he can continue to put his life on the line with a wife and small child. It is illogical and the Davenport is nothing if not logical. For all that I feel this book indicates it is a great read. The plot is dark and disturbing with moments of great levity. If you have never read a Prey book do not start with this one but it is well worth the time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2006

    My First Prey & Not My Last

    John Sandford has done a phenomenal job at keeping me on the edge of my seat! I never knew I could be so interested in horrific mystery novel until I picked up this book. Being farmiliar with the Twin Cities area was also a plus when reading this novel. I felt as if I had been traveling with Davenport the untire time. I will definitely read another book of his!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2006

    Never repetative

    Having read all of the Prey novels, as well as the 3 Kidd novels, Broken Prey is no doubt a great read. Being from the Twin Cities, I can really realated to the locations and descriptions in the books. I will pick one of these up and crank thru it, and be done reading before I know it. Always a great read, never a dull moment

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2006

    Forgotten from the top 100

    Lucas forgot Roll On Down The Highway from Bachman Turner Overdrive. However, I am unable to pick one to replace. So, the list will just have to be 101 titles long. Would that help Lonnie turn the corner? I doubt it, but that's okay. Thanks for another great one John!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2006

    My first Prey book I have read but Definitely not the last.

    The book was definitely not to be put down, and the obscene crime situations certainly kept you 'engrossed.' However, my favorite part was the extremely timid patient at the end of the book who ended up with the list of the 100 Best Rock and Roll Songs... 'where are the Beatles' he anxiously shares with the group almost beyond belief? I guess he was a snapper!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2006

    Yippee, the old Lucas is back!

    Wow, John Sandford must have listened. He dumped Weather and the kiddies in London and Lucas was kinda back to his old self. Kinda missed the gratuitous sex and violence.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2005

    He's done it again!

    This book was fantastic and most enjoyable. The great part is that it isn't a must that you've read any of the other Lucas Davenport novels to enjoy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2005

    get rid of Weather

    another great Lucus novel, however I think they would be much better if he got rid of Weather. She is such a controller which undermines his intellegence and charisma. I have visions of the son growing up to be one of the 'bad guys' in someones novel and profilers saying he turned out bad because he had such a controlling mother. If Lucas gets a different woman, give her a real name.

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