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Broken: My Story of Addiction and Redemption
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Broken: My Story of Addiction and Redemption

4.1 36
by William Cope Moyers, Katherine Ketcham
 

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Unlike some popular memoirs that have fictionalized and romanticized the degradations of drug addiction, Broken is a true-life tale of recovery that stuns and inspires with virtually every page. The eldest son of journalist Bill Moyers, William Cope Moyers relates with unforgettable clarity the story of how a young man with every advantage found himself

Overview

Unlike some popular memoirs that have fictionalized and romanticized the degradations of drug addiction, Broken is a true-life tale of recovery that stuns and inspires with virtually every page. The eldest son of journalist Bill Moyers, William Cope Moyers relates with unforgettable clarity the story of how a young man with every advantage found himself spiraling into a love affair with crack cocaine that led him to the brink of death-and how a deep spirituality allowed him to conquer his shame, transform his life, and dedicate himself to changing America's politics of addiction.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"William Cope Moyers's lucid, measured tale of his own plunge into crack-addled hell [is] frightening in its very realism.
-USA Today

"A memoir of a terrible disease and one man's spiritual journey through it . . . that should be read by those who have friends or family members caught in addiction."
The Indianapolis Star

William Cope Moyers thought that he had hit rock bottom in 1994 on the floor of an Atlanta crack house. But that was before several relapses and one near-fatal cocaine overdose. In Broken, the son of famed broadcaster Bill Moyers shares the harrowing story of his descent into addiction hell and his slow climb back. The author's realistic description of his incremental engulfment by drugs and alcohol transform what could be read as a surrealistic nightmare into an understandable human experience. Ultimately, this memoir wears a badge of hope.
Publishers Weekly
Moyers, the son of prominent author, media figure and LBJ adviser Bill Moyers, recounts his heartbreaking struggle with alcohol and cocaine during the '80s and early '90s. Moyers covered his tracks through bold-faced denial until he spiraled out of control and landed in the first of four rehab stints. Moyers's early chapters, detailing his formative years and progression toward addiction, are somewhat plodding. But once embarking on his treatment journey, Moyers deftly tackles the complexities of sobriety, especially acceptance of those broken situations and relationships that cannot be fixed. Audie Award-winning narrator Brick brings an appropriate blend of pathos and grit to the very formidable task at hand, giving compelling voice to a tale of substance abuse without descending into a maudlin soap opera confessional. Brick proves especially masterful in recreating the delicate nuances of the father-son dialogues, as the elder Moyers struggles to convey both unconditional love toward his troubled grown child and unequivocal nonacceptance for that same young man's destructive patterns of behavior. Simultaneous release with the Viking hardcover (Reviews, July 17). (Oct.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Moyers, the son of legendary TV broadcaster Bill Moyers, is a successful journalist in his own right. His gripping account of his struggles with alcohol and crack addiction will have readers rooting for him from the very beginning. The author's idyllic childhood, spent with a loving, attentive extended family in Wilmer, TX, gives way to his first alcoholic run-in with the police in college. The story then chronicles Moyers's wanderings through the valley of the shadow of death in various crack houses and his failed relationship with his first wife, Mary. Eventually, he receives treatment at the acclaimed Hazelden Clinic in Minnesota and moves toward recovery. In his spiritual quest to become a new person, he claims his first name, William. It is somewhat unsatisfactory that the question why someone from such a privileged background would end up a drug addict goes unanswered. But that may be the point: the disease of addiction respects no one. Strongly recommended for all libraries. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 5/15/06.]-Renee Axtell, Independence, MO Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780143112457
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/28/2007
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
103,064
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
18 - 17 Years

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
"William Cope Moyers's lucid, measured tale of his own plunge into crack-addled hell [is] frightening in its very realism.
-USA Today

"A memoir of a terrible disease and one man's spiritual journey through it . . . that should be read by those who have friends or family members caught in addiction."
The Indianapolis Star

Meet the Author

William Cope Moyers is the vice president for external affairs at the Hazelden Foundation in Minnesota. He is a former newspaper journalist and writer for CNN.

Customer Reviews

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Broken 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 36 reviews.
mykryptonite More than 1 year ago
sorry for my poor grammer,spelling and my all around lack of ability to put together sentences.. ect. THIS BOOK IS A MUST READ, if your a suffering addict(like myself), if you are in recovery or know somebody that is suffering with the unrelentless disease of addiction, if you have said to yourself or outloud "why cant they just stop!", if you hide your addiction in a safe dark place, or if you simply want to remind yourself what it was like in the deapest depths of hell in your darkest moments of suffering this would be considered a "must read". i found myself reading thru tears that only an addict would/could understand. i can relate to william in so many ways. im glad he touched base on the need for awareness. i am one of the ones that was turned down many times by clinics becouse of "lack of medical insurance". it touches my heart to see somebody trying to do something about it. i have read many books on this topic, but was always turned off becouse i new that it was just a story that would surely "sell". william and katherine put it into words that dont need convincing, and thats what makes this book hit so many hearts. ONLY A TRUE ADDICT COULD TELL A STORY LIKE THAT. buy the book.. read it.. I WOULD LIKE TO THANK ALLISON AND WILLIAM COPE MOYERS: William, it took me 3 days to read this book(im a slow reader). for those three days i was completly released from my inner demonds. 3 days sober.. not a bad start.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you want a glimpse into the dark worlld of addiction and the fight for recovery....this is a must read
HopeforAll More than 1 year ago
As the sister of a heroin/pain medication addict, I found William Cope Moyers' book to be very enlightening. I finally got to see the world through a drug addicts eyes. Like Moyers, my sister is in the throws of her third relapse. This is a must read for addicts and their family members. I am much more knowledgeable after reading Moyers' story on his addiction. Many thanks. I commend Moyers for his continued sobriety. Keep doing what you do for addicts everywhere.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was profoundly moved by this book and it came right as i was beginning my journey of recovery. Moyers has captured the very essence of addiction and the constant struggles we as addicts go thru before 'hopefully' coming out clean on the other side. Don't leave this one on the shelf.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really learned a lot about the disease of addiction by reading this thought-provoking book. Similar to depression, addiction is often misunderstood in our society as a choice the afflicted makes. Moyers' story is told in a way that all people can learn how tricky addictions are and how the love, support, hope and non-enabling nature of family members and friends makes a tremendous difference in the recovery of the addicted person.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought this book was very very slow reading
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book for addicts as well as friends and family of addicts.
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LillyFrog More than 1 year ago
Very moving.. This book will stay on my shelves forever. William constantly has your emotions flipping. I'm very happy I didn't pass on purchasing this book and neither will anyone else who enjoys a great memoir.
Nicole Baus More than 1 year ago
Had its moments.. Wasnt a great book but also wasnt horrible. Ive read better books with similar themes so id reccomend others before this book.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An excellent book - especially for anyone dealing with the problem of addiction in a family member. This book helped me to really understand the disease of addiction and it's treatment for the first time. It's a page turner, but you'll want to take your time reading it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Broken by William Cope Moyers is stunning. A journalist by previous profession, the writing style is up front and engaging. The book opens up with a heart wrenching scene depicted extremely well in the prologue. The first chapter brings you right into the life of Cope, his loss of security in an otherwise seemingly beautiful life. The book goes into struggles with his father, which led to a lot of drug and alcohol abuse. I sat down to read this book after borrowing from a friend and was instantly hooked. I had read the book by the end of the night, chilled to my core at how seemingly natural he could be until the drugs really took a stronghold on his life. Broken is definitely a page turner. The message behind this book is very apparent: drugs are horrid, the underlying cause can be even worse if never given proper attention. The book accurately describes how an addiction can jump from item to item, and honestly made me self examine after a few chapters. This book will provoke thought, desire, and empathy with its utter honestly and forthright manner. Cope puts forth a lot of effort and bravery depicting his very realistic journey. He is in a drug induced hell for much of the story, and has no one to blame but himself, and he embraces that. An unforgettable book, I found myself quoting many of the lines as if they were scripture and thinking about it at even the slightest cues of addiction. The way that Cope brings forth addiction as a disease and an unending cycle of dependency keeps you on edge through the whole experience. A great book for understanding loved ones with addictions, or even yourself. Being close with many affected by this disease and them not able to accurately describe what they were going through, the knowledge I found in this book really helped my relationships with these people. A must read, even for those not closely affiliated with addicts. Entertaining and educational in one package, a great combination for a lot of people who do not usually read novel length literature. Thank you to William Cope Moyers and congratulations on a great piece of work among many in the journalism world.
donnareads911 More than 1 year ago
After all the stories, (and that's what they've been, just stories), of drug addiction,etc., here is an open and honest memoir of William Moyers, son of the well-known and accomplished journalist Bill Moyers. This book doesn't stand on his father's merits or name. This book will keep you turning the pages all through the night. It will also break your heart, again and again. And again. William is now married to Allison, and they have 3 beautiful children. He is successful, and clean and works at Hazelden, where he finally "got it". This book gives hope, it inspires and after I closed it, I said my prayers. That he won't slip. That he stays the course. And by God, I think he will.
nik915 More than 1 year ago
I had never thought about addiction as a disease until I read this book. It takes a lot of courage to be truthful about the lowest points in your life but William Cope Moyers bares it all and I respect him for that. I now have a better understanding of addiction because of this book.
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