Brooklyn's Dodgers: The Bums, the Borough, and the Best of Baseball, 1947-1957 / Edition 1

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Overview


During the 1952 World Series, a Yankee fan trying to watch the game in a Brooklyn bar was told, "Why don't you go back where you belong, Yankee lover?" "I got a right to cheer my team," the intruder responded, "this is a free country." "This ain't no free country, chum," countered the Dodger fan, "this is Brooklyn." Brooklynites loved their "Bums"--Pee Wee Reese, Jackie Robinson, Duke Snider, Roy Campanella, and all the murderous parade of regulars who, after years of struggle, finally won the World Series in 1955. One could not live in Brooklyn and not catch its spirit of devotion to its baseball club.
In Brooklyn's Dodgers, Carl E. Prince captures the intensity and depth of the team's relationship to the community and its people in the 1950s. Ethnic and racial tensions were part and parcel of a working class borough; the Dodgers' presence smoothed the rough edges of the ghetto conflict always present in the life of Brooklyn. The Dodger-inspired baseball program at the fabled Parade Grounds provided a path for boys that occasionally led to the prestigious "Dodger Rookie Team," and sometimes, via minor league contracts, to Ebbets Field itself. There were the boys who lined Bedford Avenue on game days hoping to retrieve home run balls and the men in the many bars who were not only devoted fans but collectively the keepers of the Dodger past--as were Brooklyn women, and in numbers. Indeed, women were tied to the Dodgers no less than their husbands, fathers, brothers, and sons; they were only less visible. A few, like Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Marianne Moore and working class stiff Hilda Chester were regulars at Ebbets Field and far from invisible. Prince also explores the underside of the Dodgers--the "baseball Annies," and the paternity suits that went with the territory. The Dodgers' male culture was played out as well in the team's politics, in the owners' manipulation of Dodger male egos, opponents' race-baiting, and the macho bravado of the team (how Jackie Robinson, for instance, would prod Giants' catcher Sal Yvars to impotent rage by signaling him when he was going to steal second base, then taunting him from second after the steal).
The day in 1957 when Walter O'Malley, the owner of the Brooklyn Dodgers, announced that the team would be leaving for Los Angeles was one of the worst moments in baseball history, and a sad day in Brooklyn's history as well. The Dodger team was, to a degree unmatched in other major league cities, deeply enmeshed in the life and psyche of Brooklyn and its people. In this superb volume, Carl Prince illuminates this "Brooklyn" in the golden years after the Second World War.

In this superb volume, Prince captures the intensity and depth of the Brooklyn Dodgers' relationship to the community and its people in the 1950s, showing how the team's influence extended well beyond the sports arena. He also covers the underside of the Dodger experience: the paternity suits, routine baseball-related sexism, and the ethnic conflicts that went with the Brooklyn territory. 13 illustrations. 224 pp.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"[Prince] has rummaged through long-departed newspapers...and tracked the usual volumes and them some, to explain the loyalty of Brooklynites to the Dodgers."--The New York Times

"A book that should resonate deeply for those who were there."--USA Today

"At long last, a scholar using the tools of modern history has demythologized the Brooklyn Dodgers."--Sporting News

Booknews
Skidmore (political science, Drake U.) argues that President Carter's initial foreign policy agenda sought to scale back US commitments abroad, reflecting a decline in resources and a reduction in US hegemony. He demonstrates that Carter's course reversed toward a traditional containment strategy toward the Soviet Union not because of Soviet intransigence but because Cold War politics sold better at the polls, and emphasizes the day-to-day political give and take among personalities and events of the era. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195115789
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 4/28/1997
  • Edition description: REPRINT
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 649,993
  • Lexile: 1230L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.31 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.44 (d)

Meet the Author

Carl E. Prince is Professor of History at New York University, and a past chair of the department. A specialist in early American history, he has written several books and many essays on early American political culture. With this book he picks up professionally a subject in which he has had a life-long interest.

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Table of Contents

Introduction
1 Integration: Dodgers' Dilemma, Dodgers' Response 3
2 Political Culture: Reds and Dodger Blue 23
3 The Dodgers' Male Culture: The New York Rivalries 45
4 Male Culture: Owners, Chokers, and Dumb Kids 60
5 The Baseball Culture of Brooklyn's Women 77
6 The Dodgers and Male Bar Culture 92
7 The Dodgers and Brooklyn's Ethnic Isolation 102
8 Kids' Ball: The Dodgers and Brooklyn's Boys 119
9 The Outer Edges of Dodger Memory 138
Appendices 149
Notes 153
Index 193
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