The Brothers of Baker Street (Baker Street Letters Series #2)

( 13 )

Overview

"A delightful romp...The last third of the novel is one of the finest, scariest sequences in current crime fiction... For anglophiles, crime-o-philes, and all fans of wonderful writing." —Booklist (starred)

When brothers Reggie and Nigel Heath choose 221B Baker Street as the location for their law office, they don’t realize that their new office space comes with one huge stipulation; namely, they must answer the letters sent to Sherlock Holmes, the most famous resident of ...

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The Brothers of Baker Street (Baker Street Letters Series #2)

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Overview

"A delightful romp...The last third of the novel is one of the finest, scariest sequences in current crime fiction... For anglophiles, crime-o-philes, and all fans of wonderful writing." —Booklist (starred)

When brothers Reggie and Nigel Heath choose 221B Baker Street as the location for their law office, they don’t realize that their new office space comes with one huge stipulation; namely, they must answer the letters sent to Sherlock Holmes, the most famous resident of that address. While Reggie is working on a new case involving one of London’s Black Cab drivers, the letters to Sherlock Holmes are piling up. There's even one from someone who claims to be the descendent of Professor James Moriarty. With a case that would have puzzled even Sherlock himself, The Brothers of Baker Street is sure to please mystery fans, whatever their address.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for The Brothers of Baker Street

"A delightful romp...The last third of the novel is one of the finest, scariest sequences in current crime fiction... For anglophiles, crime-o-philes, and all fans of wonderful writing." —Booklist (starred)

 

"An extremely clever evil scheme will delight readers." —Publishers Weekly (starred)

 

"A heck of a ride, and fun to boot, which is all we need ask of the kind of puzzle story Mr. Robertson so ably delivers." —The New York Journal of Books

 

"The premise here is as intriguing as that of Barry Grant's novels, which see Holmes thawed out after a century in an ice flow and living in contemporary London. Great fun." —Library Journal

 

"Very entertaining novel...mystery fans, whether they're Sherlock Holmes addicts or not, will thoroughly enjoy it...It should be a popular series indeed." — Booklist

From the Publisher
Praise for The Brothers of Baker Street

"A delightful romp...The last third of the novel is one of the finest, scariest sequences in current crime fiction... For anglophiles, crime-o-philes, and all fans of wonderful writing." —Booklist (starred)  "An extremely clever evil scheme will delight readers." —Publishers Weekly (starred)  "A heck of a ride, and fun to boot, which is all we need ask of the kind of puzzle story Mr. Robertson so ably delivers." —The New York Journal of Books  "The premise here is as intriguing as that of Barry Grant's novels, which see Holmes thawed out after a century in an ice flow and living in contemporary London. Great fun." —Library Journal  "Very entertaining novel...mystery fans, whether they're Sherlock Holmes addicts or not, will thoroughly enjoy it...It should be a popular series indeed." — Booklist

Marilyn Stasio
…[a] breezy and entertaining legal mystery.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
Set in 1997, Robertson's second mystery featuring barrister Reggie Heath, whose chambers are located at Sherlock Holmes's legendary address, offers pacing, prose, and plotting at a level far above that of its predecessor, 2009's The Baker Street Letters. On returning to London from California, Heath finds underwhelming demand for his professional services as well as pressure to abide by the terms of his lease by responding to letters addressed to the fictional character. An attractive solicitor, Darla Rennie, retains Heath to represent Neil Walters, a cab driver accused of murdering a young couple. Despite having been burned in his previous criminal case, Heath dives into defending Walters, only to end up in jeopardy himself. He must rely on his brother, Nigel, for help in escaping his peril, which may be connected with a letter writer to Baker Street who signs his correspondence Moriarty. An extremely clever evil scheme will delight readers. (Mar.)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781250000767
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 11/8/2011
  • Series: Baker Street Letters Series , #2
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 176,508
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

MICHAEL ROBERTSON works for a large company with branches in the United States and England. His first novel in this series, The Baker Street Letters, has been optioned by Warner Bros. for television. He lives in San Clemente, California.

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Read an Excerpt

1

 

LONDON, AUTUMN 1997

In Mayfair, the owner of an elegant Edwardian white-stone sat down at the garden table with unusually high expectations for breakfast.

It was a bright September morning, quite lovely indeed; the roses in the garden were much more fragrant than in many days or weeks past—more so than anyone could possibly understand—and there was every reason to believe that breakfast would be equally remarkable.

The servant girl would bring tea and scones for a start. The tea would be hot and dark and would swirl together with the milk like vanilla and caramel taffy; the scones would be fresh and warm and appropriately crumbly when broken in two, and the butter would melt into each half like rain into loose garden soil.

The breakfast would be wonderful—especially so because it was no longer necessary to take the medications that accompanied it.

No medications, no nausea. No medications, no mental dullness. No medications, no loss of pleasure in the ordinary, everyday elements of life.

Not taking the bloody little pills was certainly the way to go.

The wonder was why the servant girl still bothered bringing them at all.

Several steps away in the parlor, the servant girl—a young woman, who had emigrated from Russia only a few years earlier and shortened her name to Ilsa (because there was a tennis star of that name and people could pronounce it)—arranged a china setting on a silver serving tray, with all the breakfast components her employer was expecting.

She placed the medications on the tray as well—a yellow pill for the schizophrenia, a round blue one to alleviate the depression caused by the yellow one; and a square white one to deal with the nausea caused by the blue one, but apparently not to great effect. And there was a small pink one, which was related to the effects of the other three in some complicated way that no one had adequately explained.

The pills had been part of the daily regimen ever since Ilsa was first hired. That was almost a year ago now. Ilsa’s employer, just a few years older than Ilsa herself, had lost both parents to an automobile accident at that time, and needed some assistance with the daily routine. Ilsa had been brought in to prepare the meals, to put the medicines on the tray, and to do the housekeeping and other chores. She wanted to do all of her tasks well.

Keeping the place tidy was more trouble than it should have been. Like a cat bringing presents from the garden, her employer kept discovering and bringing in small pieces of furniture and such from the parents’ estate. Ilsa had counted five lamps, three vases, an ancient portable typewriter, and innumerable scrapbooks and folders and yellowed paper items, some of which her employer had begun to take upstairs alone to study in private.

But as difficult as the housekeeping was, what worried Ilsa most was the medications. A new doctor had come by—a man Ilsa did not particularly like—and said not to worry about them. So Ilsa tried not to worry. But she continued to put the pills on the tray anyway, as she had been originally told to do. It seemed to her that she still should do so. And she was uncertain of all the regulations in her adopted country; she did not want to get in trouble.

Now she brought the breakfast setting out to the garden. And she also brought a copy of the Daily Sun.

Ilsa placed the silver tray on the table. Her employer smiled slightly and nodded. Then Ilsa stood at the table and began to read the headlines aloud from the tabloid.

This had been become a ritual in recent weeks, and she took some pride in getting good at it.

“‘Prime Minister Calls for Moratorium on Queue Cutting,’” read Ilsa.

“No,” said her employer.

“‘Prince Harry Fathers Love Child with Underage Martian Girl.’”

“No.”

“‘Liverpool Louts Stab Man in Front of Pregnant Wife.’”

“No. Page two?”

“Just adverts.”

“And on page three?”

“A woman in her underwear—and nothing on top. Shall I read the caption?” Ilsa giggled just slightly, because she was beginning to understand the British fondness for bad puns, and she was looking forward to demonstrating that knowledge.

“No, Ilsa. I don’t need to know about the page-three girl. Go to page four.”

“Two headlines on page four,” said Ilsa. “The first is: ‘Taxi Drivers a Terror to Tourists?’”

It was an article about a spate of robberies and nonlethal assaults against patrons of Black Cabs. Ilsa read the headline with the proper inflexion, making it sound as alarming as the headline writer clearly intended it to be.

“Hmm.” Ilsa’s employer seemed disappointed and began to butter a scone.

“And the second is a lawyer on Baker Street who denies that he’s Sherlock Holmes,” continued Ilsa. “There’s a photo. I think one might call him good-looking, in a stuffy sort of way.”

Her employer abruptly stopped buttering. There was silence for a moment. Then—

“Let me see it.”

It was just three short paragraphs, not even breaking news; just a follow-up piece, about one Reggie Health—a thirty-five-year-old London barrister—and the unusual circumstances of a trip he had taken to Los Angeles a short time earlier.

Ilsa watched as her employer stared at the passage for a very long time, eyes searching intently, as though there were something more on the page than just the words.

“Is something wrong?” said Ilsa.

“It’s like trying to find a gray cat in the fog,” said Ilsa’s employer finally, getting up from the table, with the Daily News in hand, and without finishing breakfast. “But I think I am beginning to remember.”

Ilsa did not ask what was being remembered. She took the tray away, saw that the medications were again untouched, and wished it were not so.

 

Copyright © 2011 by Michael Robertson

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 23, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    This is a diabolically brilliant thriller

    In 1997 Reggie Heath has leased 221B Baker Street, but the "Balmy Barrister" as the tabloids call him knows the stipulation in the rental agreement includes answering letters to Holmes. His last activity in that endeavor due to his younger brother Nigel lead to Reggie losing his money, his girl (actress Laura Rankin who is hanging with Lord Buxton) and his self respect (see The Baker Street Letters). However, as Rafferty of the Committee reminds him he must answer the letters or be evicted. He calls Nigel in Los Angeles to tell him to respond to the letters which include one from an alleged Moriarty descendent he sends to his sibling.

    Meanwhile solicitor Darla Rennie hires Reggie to represent Neil Walters, a London Black Cab driver, accused of murdering two Americans. Reggie works diligently on his client's defense, but that places him in peril. He needs Nigel to come to the rescue, but his brother is across the pond and continent while all roads lead to and from Moriarty.

    This is a diabolically brilliant thriller that Holmes and Watson would struggle to solve let alone the Heath brothers. Fast-paced and loaded with action, the Baker Street Irregulars and anyone who enjoys a terrific nefarious scheme will relish the escapades of The Brothers of Baker Street as once again Nigel seems headed to another spread in tabloid hell if he should live so long to read it.

    Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 10, 2013

    This second mystery in a series about Reggie and Nigel Heath, is

    This second mystery in a series about Reggie and Nigel Heath, is a serious mystery spoof on the Sherlock Holmes mysteries.  In 1997 London, the Heath brothers have leased 221 Baker Street for their law offices.  As part of their lease, they must send a form letter to everyone who sends them a letter addressed to the legendary Sherlock Holmes.  Right now, that's about all that is happening at their offices.  Then the lovely barrister, Darla Rennie asks Reggie to defend a London Black Cabbie against a murder charge. In doing so, Reggie gets himself deep into a deadly situation concerning all of the Black Cabbies.  




    This mystery has lots of charm and humor mixed in with serious threats, chases, and an unusual psychological workshop.  A letter signed by a "Dr Moriarty" comes to Baker Street sending Reggie onto a clue to save his client, but it also seems to threaten his own life. The London Black Cabbies play an important roll in solving the crime also.




    Clever take on the Sherlock Holmes theme!  Looking forward to reading more in this series!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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