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Buckskin Dresses and Pumpkin Breeches: Colonial Fashions from the 1580s to 1760s
     

Buckskin Dresses and Pumpkin Breeches: Colonial Fashions from the 1580s to 1760s

by Kate Havelin
 

Many Native American women made skirts or dresses out of deerskin. They completed the look with Jewelry crafted from metal, shells, stones, pearls, or animal bones.

Native American men often wore a breechcloth. For special events, prominent Iroquois men showed off deer antlers in their headdresses.

In European settlements women of fashion dressed in many layers

Overview

Many Native American women made skirts or dresses out of deerskin. They completed the look with Jewelry crafted from metal, shells, stones, pearls, or animal bones.

Native American men often wore a breechcloth. For special events, prominent Iroquois men showed off deer antlers in their headdresses.

In European settlements women of fashion dressed in many layers. One of the first layers was a stay-a corsetlike garment made of whalebone that tied or laced around the chest. On top of that, they put on a bodice, a waistcoat or a jacket, and several heavy petticoats.

Stylish men from Europe donned pumpkin breeches-knee-length trousers stuffed with rags, horsehair, and grain.

Owners provided two Outfits for their slaves, one for winter and one for summer. Men often wore simple breeches and shirts. Women wore basic, lightweight dresses.

Colonial toddlers wore pudding caps. These padded hats looked like round dishes used to serve pudding. They protected toddlers' heads when they fell.

Read more about colonial fashions-from wigs to beaver-pelt hats and linen caps-in this fascinating book!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761358879
Publisher:
Lerner Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/01/2011
Series:
Dressing a Nation: the History of U. S. Fashion Series
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
8.10(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

Kate Havelin has written more than a dozen books for young people, including biographies of Queen Elizabeth I, Ulysses Grant, and Che Guevara. The Amelia Bloomer Project included her Victoria Woodhull: Fearless Feminist in its recommended list of books. Havelin has also written two trail guidebooks for adults, Minnesota Running Trails: Dirt, Gravel, Rocks & Roots and Best Hikes of the Twin Cities, both of which received awards from the Midwest Book Awards. When she's not writing, she likes to read, run, hike, kayak, ski, or snowshoe. Havelin lives in St. Paul with her husband and two teenage sons.

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