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Buddhist Warfare
     

Buddhist Warfare

by Michael Jerryson, Mark Juergensmeyer
 

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ISBN-10: 0195394836

ISBN-13: 9780195394832

Pub. Date: 01/08/2010

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Though traditionally regarded as a peaceful religion, Buddhism has a dark side. On multiple occasions over the past fifteen centuries, Buddhist leaders have sanctioned violence, and even war. The eight essays in this book focus on a variety of Buddhist traditions, from antiquity to the present, and show that Buddhist organizations have used religious images and

Overview

Though traditionally regarded as a peaceful religion, Buddhism has a dark side. On multiple occasions over the past fifteen centuries, Buddhist leaders have sanctioned violence, and even war. The eight essays in this book focus on a variety of Buddhist traditions, from antiquity to the present, and show that Buddhist organizations have used religious images and rhetoric to support military conquest throughout history.

Buddhist soldiers in sixth century China were given the illustrious status of Bodhisattva after killing their adversaries. In seventeenth century Tibet, the Fifth Dalai Lama endorsed a Mongol ruler's killing of his rivals. And in modern-day Thailand, Buddhist soldiers carry out their duties undercover, as fully ordained monks armed with guns.

Buddhist Warfare demonstrates that the discourse on religion and violence, usually applied to Judaism, Islam, and Christianity, can no longer exclude Buddhist traditions. The book examines Buddhist military action in Tibet, China, Korea, Japan, Mongolia, Sri Lanka, and Thailand, and shows that even the most unlikely and allegedly pacifist religious traditions are susceptible to the violent tendencies of man.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195394832
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
01/08/2010
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.90(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction - Michael Jerryson
Chapter One: Buddhism and War - Paul Demiéville
Chapter Two: Making Merit through Warfare - Stephen Jenkins
Chapter Three: Sacralized Warfare: The Fifth Dalai Lama and the Discourse
of Religious Violence - Derek F. Mahler
Chapter Four: Corporal Punishment during Mongolia's Theocratic Period - Vesna Wallace
Chapter Five: A Buddhological Critique of 'Soldier Zen' in Wartime Japan 148 - Brian Victoria
Chapter Six: Buddhist Monks in China during the Korean War - Xue Yu
Chapter Seven: Sermons to Soldiers in the Sri Lankan Army - Daniel Kent
Chapter Eight: Militarizing Buddhism: Violence in Southern Thailand - Michael Jerryson
Concluding Remarks: Afterthoughts - Bernard Faure
Appendix
Bibliography
Introduction. Michael Jerryson
1. Buddhism and War, Paul Demiéville
2. Making Merit through Warfare, Stephen Jenkins
3. Sacralized Warfare: The Fifth Dalai Lama and the Discourse of Religious Violence, Derek F. Mahler
4. Corporal Punishment during Mongolia's Theocratic Period, Vesna Wallace
5. A Buddhological Critique of 'Soldier Zen' in Wartime Japan, Brian Victoria
6. Buddhist Monks in China during the Korean War, Xue Yu
7. Sermons to Soldiers in the Sri Lankan Army, Daniel Kent
8. Militarizing Buddhism: Violence in Southern Thailand, Michael Jerryson
Concluding Remarks: Afterthoughts, Bernard Faure

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