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The Buffalo War: The History of the Red River Indian Uprising of 1874
     

The Buffalo War: The History of the Red River Indian Uprising of 1874

by James L. Haley
 

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The U.S. Army battles three powerful Indian tribes-the Comanches, Kiowas, and Southern Cheyennes-in the Texas Panhandle.

Overview

The U.S. Army battles three powerful Indian tribes-the Comanches, Kiowas, and Southern Cheyennes-in the Texas Panhandle.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

" Scores of scholars have grappled with one or more of the contradictory elements of the Red River War of 1874, but only Haley has succeeded. ... At least a half-dozen professional historians may honestly remark upon reading Haley's book that they wish they had written it." -Journal of American History

"A poignant, sweeping canvas of a long forgotten conflict ... colorful, exciting, detailed. Students of the West will relish it."-Hartford Times

"The Buffalo War is excellent history. Meticulously researched and well written, it could well stand as the definitive work in this field. Haley writes with a pleasing and perceptive style." -Montana

Booknews
A history of the 1874 Red River War, called the final campaign of whites versus the Southern Plains Indians. Locates the roots of Indian unrest in the whites' wholesale slaughter of the buffalo, which destroyed the Indians' economy and way of life. Discusses the internal conflicts between factions on each side of the larger conflict: between pro-war and pro-peace Indian factions, and between the US Army and the Indian Bureau for control of governmental policy. Originally published in 1976. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781880510599
Publisher:
Texas A&M University Press
Publication date:
04/04/1976
Pages:
348
Sales rank:
1,292,550
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.78(d)
Age Range:
10 Years

Read an Excerpt

The situation of the South Plains Indians in 1874 was the product of all, understood, even though that history had left them impoverished and materially wretched, dominated by another race of men whom they had been exposed for only a few decades, and gnawed by a horrible intuition that their entire social structure was doomed, and the days of their tribes, numbered.

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