Bugialli's Italy: Traditional Recipes from the Regions of Italy

Bugialli's Italy: Traditional Recipes from the Regions of Italy

by Giuliano Bugialli
     
 

Emilia-Romagna, Friuli, Sicily, Liguria, Piedmont, Apulia — the names trip off the tongue and conjure seductive images of deeply satisfying food. In Bugialli's Italy, companion cookbook to the new twenty-six-part public television series, cooking teacher and food historian Giuliano Bugialli presents the reader with an irresistible banquet of all Italy

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Overview

Emilia-Romagna, Friuli, Sicily, Liguria, Piedmont, Apulia — the names trip off the tongue and conjure seductive images of deeply satisfying food. In Bugialli's Italy, companion cookbook to the new twenty-six-part public television series, cooking teacher and food historian Giuliano Bugialli presents the reader with an irresistible banquet of all Italy has to offer.

The more than 150 recipes collected here span the boot from north to south east to west. You can take your grand tour from antipasto to dessert (how about Pizza with Tomato Pockets from Apulia, Pureed Chick-Pea Soup with Mushrooms from Umbria, Lamb in Peppery Wine Sauce from Abruzzi, String Beans in Caper Walnut Sauce from Lombardy, and, to finish, Peach Cake with Almonds from Piedmont?). Or why not plan a regional tasting of pastas — Stewed Sardinian Pasta, Pasta Stuffed with Eggplant from Tuscany, Tagliatelle and Zucchini Blossoms from Lazio, and Pasta with Sicilian Winter Pesto? Even gnocchi flies the regional flag-Red Beet Gnocchi from Piedmont and Potato Gnocchi with Ligurian Pesto and Tomatoes.

As always, Giuliano serves up something new — a wonderful collection of unusual and engaging regional recipes filled with the history tradition, and techniques that make his books so special.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Bugialli brings together another sampling of Italian cooking (The Fine Art of Italian Cooking; The Foods of Sicily and Sardinia and the Smaller Islands, 1996), although here he takes the level of difficulty up a notch, calling for unusual ingredients or equipment. Bugialli is most creative--and challenging--in the chapter on first courses: Ravioli with Sole Sauce from the Marches is a lengthy project; Abruzzi's "Guitar" Pasta with Pepper Sauce is more reasonable, but making the pasta requires a special tool (a wooden implement strung with metal wires--the inspiration for the name). Other appetizers include a Soup of Stuffed Romaine Lettuce Leaves from Liguria, which features bundles of lettuce with a sweetbread stuffing. The handful of risotto recipes includes Risotto with Asparagus Tips and Risotto with Duck, Pheasant, or Chicken Livers. Main courses are simpler, but somewhat familiar: Shrimp Wrapped in Pancetta Cooked on Skewers; Veal Shank in Vegetable Sauce; and Sausages Baked with Cauliflower and Potatoes. Desserts such as Apricot Semifreddo (eaten all over Italy) and Almond Sponge Cake from Padua round out the selection. Although these dishes require time to prepare, patient cooks will have no problem following Bugialli's recipes, each of which includes a regional label; most sport informative headers. Tie-in to PBS series; author tour. (Oct.)
Library Journal
The latest cookbook from the author of Bugialli's Foods of Tuscany (LJ 10/15/92), among many others, is the companion volume to his new PBS series, and offers what he calls a "panorama" of Italian regional cooking. Although the cooking of Rome, the Veneto, and the less well known Friuli region receive somewhat more attention, the more than 150 recipes come from all over the country. Headnotes discuss provenance and point out the similarities or differences among related recipes from the various regions; some of the dishes are distinctly local specialties, little known outside of their particular provenance. Recipes are organized generally by course, rather than region, with a particularly outstanding selection of pastas and a separate section of Roman vegetable dishes. Highly recommended. [BOMC alternate.]

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688158644
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/16/1998
Pages:
302
Product dimensions:
8.39(w) x 10.33(h) x 1.11(d)

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Read an Excerpt

BRUSCHETTA DI PECORINO AL PEPE NERO

Bruschetta with Pecorino Cheese and Pepper

Makes 6

6 ounces not-very-aged Tuscan Pecorino cheese

3 tablespoons extra Virgin olive oil

Freshly ground black pepper

TO SERVE:

6 slices country-style bread, each about 4 inches square

1 large clove garlic (optional), peeled

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil (optional)

Fresh basil leaves (optional)

Remove the rind from the cheese and cut it into very small pieces. Place the cheese in a crockery or glass bowl, add the olive oil and a lot of black pepper, and toss very well. Toast the bread over coals, in the oven, or in the toaster. While still very hot, if desired, rub the bread on one or both sides with the garlic and top each slice with the marinated cheese and some of the olive oil. Serve, if desired, with = tablespoon of the olive oil drizzled over each slice and basil leaves.

Meet the Author

Giuliano Bugialli teaches at his school, a fifteenth-century villaoutside of Florence, and at cooking schools across the United States.He is the author of six cookbooks, including The Fine Art of Italian Cooking and the Julia Child Award-winning Foods of Sicily & Sardinia and the Smaller Islands. He lives in New York City and Italy.

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