Bugs Are Insects

Bugs Are Insects

5.0 3
by Anne F. Rockwell, Steve Jenkins
     
 

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Is a ladybug really a bug?
Is a honeybee an insect?
How about a spider?
How do you know?

Find out how you can tell if a beautiful butterfly or a crawling centipede is actually an insect or something else. Discover a hidden world of tiny creatures building their homes, stalking their prey, and hiding from their enemies right in your own backyard

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Overview

Is a ladybug really a bug?
Is a honeybee an insect?
How about a spider?
How do you know?

Find out how you can tell if a beautiful butterfly or a crawling centipede is actually an insect or something else. Discover a hidden world of tiny creatures building their homes, stalking their prey, and hiding from their enemies right in your own backyard.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Is a spider an insect? No! This answer may surprise you, but after reading this book, you will learn that an insect is defined as an animal with three parts and six legs. The eight-legged spider doesn't fit that category. Reading this book, you will learn how to identify what an insect is and which bugs are not insects. The unique illustrations in the book are beautiful. Insects and other small creatures have been cut out of paper and other fabric materials so that a young child can quickly discover which are insects and which are not by looking at the details of the tiny creatures. The back of the book has an index of the types included so that a teacher or parent can quickly identify it with a young person. The book is designed to teach simple science concepts to preschoolers and kindergartners. It would be well used in a classroom setting as well as in a home setting. Part of the "Lets-Read-and-Find-Out Science" series. 2001, HarperCollins Publishers,
— Nicole Peterson <%ISBN%>0060285680 <%ISBN%>0060285699
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 1-3-This well-written and informative book introduces budding entomologists to the world of insects and bugs. Rockwell offers basic factual information in an interesting, easy-to-read format. Common insects are introduced, and the main differences between insects and spiders are explained as well as what makes a bug a bug. The collage illustrations are beautifully rendered with layered colored papers of a variety of textures that add both depth and details to the creatures. The honeybee looks extremely lifelike with a fuzzy body and legs, and the illustration of a multihued birdwing butterfly accurately and attractively shows it sucking nectar from a flower. An index identifies the types of insects and other bugs that are found in the book, and some projects are suggested for those interested in learning more about insects. A strong title for both school and public libraries.-Lisa Gangemi Krapp, Middle Country Public Library, Centereach, NY Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This super new title in the Let's-Read-And-Find-Out Science series encourages young children to look more closely at insects and think like scientists. Rockwell, who has written many fine nonfiction titles for preschool and kindergartners, is right on target with this "Stage 1" science title that asks children to think about what makes an insect and what makes a bug. She suggests, "Count its legs. Count how many parts make up its body." She explains all insects have exoskeletons, but not all creatures with exoskeletons are insects. She then defines insects: "anything with six legs and three body parts is an insect," and invites children to look carefully at a ladybug and a spider and decide if either or both is an insect or a bug or neither. A bug, she explains, "is an insect that has a mouth like a beak and a head that forms a triangle." She introduces a variety of other creepy crawlies and encourages children to count the body parts and legs and decide which are insects. Lastly, there are suggestions for finding out more and a list of all the insects pictured. Dramatic cut paper collage illustrations by Jenkins invite careful looking and ably extend the text. Eye-appealing and useful for beginning science enthusiasts and their parents as well. (Nonfiction. 4-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060285685
Publisher:
HarperCollins Children's Books
Publication date:
05/01/1901
Series:
Let's-Read-and-Find-out Science Books Series
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
10.31(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Anne Rockwell is the acclaimed author of many books for children, including the Mrs. Madoff books; Brendan and Belinda and the Slam Dunk!; and Who Lives in an Alligator Hole? and Why Are the Ice Caps Melting? in the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series. She is the author-illustrator of Here Comes the Night and Welcome to Kindergarten, among others. She lives in Greenwich, Connecticut.

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