Bugs Before Time: Prehistoric Insects and Their Relatives
  • Alternative view 1 of Bugs Before Time: Prehistoric Insects and Their Relatives
  • Alternative view 2 of Bugs Before Time: Prehistoric Insects and Their Relatives

Bugs Before Time: Prehistoric Insects and Their Relatives

by Cathy Camper, Steve Kirk
     
 

Did you know that for every pound of people on earth, there are 300 pounds of insects? Or that millions of years ago some of these bugs actually weighed that much? Well, during prehistoric times, before dinosaurs ruled the earth, bugs did; and just like today the seas, skies, and lands were covered by these creepy-crawlers. There were dragonflies with wings that

Overview

Did you know that for every pound of people on earth, there are 300 pounds of insects? Or that millions of years ago some of these bugs actually weighed that much? Well, during prehistoric times, before dinosaurs ruled the earth, bugs did; and just like today the seas, skies, and lands were covered by these creepy-crawlers. There were dragonflies with wings that reached a yard across in length, and millipedes that grew to over six feet long! But what is even more fascinating is the fact that all of these creatures in some form or another learned to adapt and survive to become the insects and sea beasts of today.
In this fully illustrated picture book, readers will be captivated by the detailed information of prehistoric insects, arachnids, and their relatives. Chock-full of facts about fossil formation, insect evolution, flight theories, and geologic time, Bugs Before Time will mesmerize entomologists of all ages. Author Cathy Camper's absorbing text, and artist Steve Kirk's extraordinary paintings combine to re-create a world where giants reigned.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Multiple perspectives on what we know about prehistoric insects are presented in lively page designs and vigorous language. An upper left hand box of text anchors each page while sidebars, boxed text, labels, charts, and lists explain how early insects were often giants and why, how a fossil is made and what it indicates, early insect ancestors and evolution, a great page on trilobites (though one wishes for a picture of a trilobite shedding its armor), and separate sections on winged insects, dragonflies, centipedes, ants, spiders, and all the rest (butterflies, beetles, etc...). The breathless presentation wears at times with unnecessary emphasis (GOBBLED UP, LURKED, DANGER, and PROBABLY BIGGER THAN YOUR MOM!) But at the same time, the text uses wonderfully apt comparisons for sizes, shapes or movement, and it reads aloud well. Who could resist all of those expressive exclamation points, questions and answers, and fascinating believe-it-or-not biggest, fastest, "mostest": facts? Kirk's realistic paintings are detailed recreations of what might have been and provide punchy complement to the text. End matter includes a wealth of facts about Pangaea the supercontinent, geologic time, a marvelous and close-packed four-part set of references (almost too small to read), and a pronouncing and definition glossary. Quite a package and crammed full of excitement and wonder, as well. 2002, Simon & Schuster,
— Susan Hepler
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-A handsome introduction to prehistoric insects and other arthropods. Camper's up-to-date, conversational text and informative captions and data boxes investigate such disparate matters as insect evolution, theories on flight development, continental drift, and fossil formation. While not an in-depth dissertation, there is plenty of meat here for young researchers, assisted by an excellent list of further readings and some Web sites. Kirk's eye-catching, realistic watercolors portray a fascinating array of creatures, some with evolutionary existing descendants: trilobites, ants, eurypterids, and dragonflies among them. Neither an index nor a table of contents is provided, which may cause some dismay, but the chapter headings on every other page (and those nifty illustrations) should assist readers. A colorful time line is appended to assist in placing the discussed creatures in Earth's prehistory, as is a helpful glossary of the many unfamiliar terms. The book is sure to entrance budding entomologists and surprise dinophiles with the Arthropoda's long evolutionary history (which ante- and postdates their beloved beasts by a good many millions of years).-Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Full of odd and impressive facts and attention-grabbing headlines that will thrill and intrigue young nature enthusiasts, this debut is irresistible. Chapter headings say it all, as in: "Trilobites: Supersuckers," "Bugs Rule the Earth," or "Dragonflies: Rulers of the Sky." The reader learns that "for every pound of people on earth, there are three hundred pounds of insects." And that there were ancient relatives of the scorpions that "wouldn't fit in your bathtub." The author explains how ancient insect fossils were formed, why scientists study insects, and current theories about how insects developed wings. Full-color drawings on each page are appealing to the eye and dramatic as they show giant-sized insects and their relatives in their ancient habitats, as well as enlarged views of insect special features, like the big claw of the dragonfly naiad. She concludes with a geologic timeline that shows when insects evolved and an extensive reading list including magazine articles, Web sites, and a glossary. This title will fly off the shelves and send shivers of delight. (Nonfiction. 8-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689820922
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
Publication date:
04/01/2002
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
392,828
Product dimensions:
11.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
5 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Cathy Camper has published articles and stories for children and adults in Cricket, Wired, and Giant Robot magazines. She coedits a tiny magazine about candy called Sugar Needle, and likes to make art out of seeds, and toy robots out of junk. Although she loves fossilized insects and getting surprises in the mail, please don't send her any gigantic bugs, especially if they have more than eight legs. This is her first book for children.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >